This penny stock is up 15% in 1 month. Should I buy?

first_img Image source: Getty Images Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. This penny stock is up 15% in 1 month. Should I buy? Nadia Yaqub | Monday, 14th June, 2021 | More on: MTO I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner.But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared.What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations.And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. See all posts by Nadia Yaqub Nadia Yaqub has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.center_img Mitie (LSE: MTO) is a penny stock that has been rising. During the last month the shares have risen 15% and they’re up more than 85% during the last year.Of course, past performance isn’t an indication of future returns. But I commented on Mitie being a penny stock that I’d buy in June. And I still hold this view. The company reported its full-year results last week. And the numbers look promising.5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…The resultsThe 2021 financial year marked the end of Mitie’s four-year transformation. And the company showed resilience through the pandemic. Revenue increased by 19% to £2.6bn. This included a four-month contribution from its Interserve acquisition.But operating profits fell. The company said that the additional profit from contract wins, inclusion of Interserve and associated £6.2m of synergies was “more than offset by the impact of Covid on trading, the ending of certain profitable contracts in the prior year and the reinstatement of incentives and share based payments (which were waived last year to preserve our financial strength)”.Order bookYet I like that Mitie’s order book looks strong. As of the end of March, it stood at £7.2bn, which included £3.2bn from Interserve. This offers revenue stability and transparency, which is something I look for when analysing a company.What is encouraging is that the FTSE 250 firm has managed to either win or renew contracts worth £1.3bn. To me, this highlights that Mitie’s clients think it’s doing a good job, otherwise they wouldn’t have extended their contracts. It also reconfirms the company’s market position and makes it stand out from its competitors.Mitie acquired Interserve in November last year. Most of the acquisition’s order book has contracts that average 15 years in length. What I also like is how Mitie has managed to renew or extend all of Interserve’s major contracts that came up for renewal in the four-month period under ownership. This should prove to be positive for the penny stock in the long term.Net debtMitie is also improving its financial position. The net debt position at the year-end stood at £86.7m compared to the previous year’s £153m. Clearly, a rights issue and refinancing of its credit facility have helped.But it’s good to see that the company’s liabilities are falling and heading in the right direction. I think the shares could rise further on the back on of an improving balance sheet.RisksIt’s clear that Mitie was hit by Covid-19. While restrictions are somewhat easing, I’m not suggesting the pandemic is completely over. The coronavirus crisis could continue to impact profitability just as it did in its 2021 financial year. Another period of low profits may prove to be negative for the shares.But I think things look promising for this penny stock. It’s winning or renewing contracts while the Interserve acquisition seems to be integrating well and is starting to pay off. The four-year transformation plan has come to an end, so investors should start to see the benefits. I’d buy Mitie shares today. Enter Your Email Address Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. 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Student government seeks to promote diversity

first_imgDuring their campaign in the spring, student body president and vice president Corey Robinson and Becca Blais stressed diversity and inclusion as one of their top priorities.Before the school year started, student government directed much of their attention to addressing violence from and against police officers, Robinson said. “This year — after this summer — a lot of our efforts have been on police brutality and the unjust reaction, as far as the violence toward our law enforcement officials and officers,” he said. Blais said the political climate — including police brutality and concerns post-election — was having a heavy influence on how student government was approaching diversity and inclusion, especially when it came to students protected under Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). “I would say, especially this fall, that has become something that we’re focusing a lot of attention on,” she said. “How do we make our DACA students feel comfortable? How do we make them feel safe? And not only DACA students, but just students who feel marginalized, especially following the election.” Robinson said Race Relations Week was intended to directly engage with and start dialogue around political issues. Race Relations Week included a showing of the one-man play “The Cop” and a panel exploring racial justice in the context of opportunity. The panel included David Robinson, former NBA player and father of Robinson; David Krashna, Notre Dame’s first African-American body president; Christina Brooks, the City of South Bend’s diversity and inclusion officer; and Maria and Gabby Muñoz, undocumented students at Notre Dame. Originally, Race Relations Week had two more events — a talk on the intersection of race and sexual assault and a mock presidential debate — but they fell through. Both events occurred later in the semester. “We did have a lot of mishaps, and there’s no excuse for that,” Robinson said. “There’s no excuse that we had four events planned and two fell through. That was a week before. We packaged it as a four-event week and then a week before, turns out some things had to be changed.”In spite of the scheduling issues, Robinson said he thought the week was a success, in terms of starting dialogue on campus, a sentiment that Blais echoed. “To be fair, it was the first of its kind in terms of student events, so I think it’s a good starting place and hopefully it’s continued,” she said.Robinson said that if Race Relations Week were to become an annual event, it would be a “very nice compliment” to Walk the Walk Week in January.“We really talked about a breadth of issues,” he said. “ …  It could encourage campus to talk about diversity and inclusion year-round.”Student Union representative to Diversity Council Rachel Wallace, a fifth-year, acts as a liaison between the cabinet for student government and the Diversity Council board. She said she was especially pleased with the turnout for “The Cop.” “Our target for that was really majority students and white students and thinking about ‘how do I have different biases,’ but it applied to everyone,” she said. While Wallace has worked with other student groups the last four years, she said working with student government was a “completely different experience.” “We bring a new advantage to events because we have access to more students,” she said. “We represent the whole student body. So do other groups, like Diversity Council … but sometimes people see Diversity Council and think it doesn’t apply to them. So for student government to be on an event, it’s helpful because people feel like they’re included in the conversation.“ … We program things, but we had a focus on supporting groups who have been doing this and who have expertise in the field. For example, [Multicultural Student Programs and Services] and Diversity Council have expertise on diversity and inclusion, so if we can support what they’re doing, that’s where our focus has been.”While student government is planning more programming for next semester — including an event for Walk the Walk Week and a town hall meeting  — Wallace said much of their involvement has been centered on supporting existing programming through cosponsorship. “The students who are in the trenches, doing the groundwork, we’re going to support them any way that we can,” she said. “ … We try to stand in solidarity as best as we can, with the presence the student body has authentically built up.”As someone who is involved in both student government and Diversity Council, Wallace said each side has different goals for next semester. “One thing [to improve on] from the senate perspective, that I agree with, is bringing in people who might not be interested inherently,” she said. “We’re hitting an audience with these events, but they’re people who already care about these issues, who are already actively involved, and we want to figure out how to reach the general student body. “ … I know from the Diversity Council perspective, one thing we want is more action based on the dialogue we’re having. One thing we’re interested is to partner with other organizations to take action on these issues and not just talk about them forever.”Diversity and inclusion are critical to forming the community of Notre Dame, Robinson said. “I think Fr. Jenkins said it the best,” he said. “Notre Dame is for all students and if we don’t do that, we’re not Notre Dame. We’re either all Notre Dame or none of us are Notre Dame.”Tags: 2016 Student Government Insider, DACA, Diversity, diversity council, inclusion, police brutality, Race Relations Week, Student governmentlast_img read more

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