Student government seeks to promote diversity

first_imgDuring their campaign in the spring, student body president and vice president Corey Robinson and Becca Blais stressed diversity and inclusion as one of their top priorities.Before the school year started, student government directed much of their attention to addressing violence from and against police officers, Robinson said. “This year — after this summer — a lot of our efforts have been on police brutality and the unjust reaction, as far as the violence toward our law enforcement officials and officers,” he said. Blais said the political climate — including police brutality and concerns post-election — was having a heavy influence on how student government was approaching diversity and inclusion, especially when it came to students protected under Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). “I would say, especially this fall, that has become something that we’re focusing a lot of attention on,” she said. “How do we make our DACA students feel comfortable? How do we make them feel safe? And not only DACA students, but just students who feel marginalized, especially following the election.” Robinson said Race Relations Week was intended to directly engage with and start dialogue around political issues. Race Relations Week included a showing of the one-man play “The Cop” and a panel exploring racial justice in the context of opportunity. The panel included David Robinson, former NBA player and father of Robinson; David Krashna, Notre Dame’s first African-American body president; Christina Brooks, the City of South Bend’s diversity and inclusion officer; and Maria and Gabby Muñoz, undocumented students at Notre Dame. Originally, Race Relations Week had two more events — a talk on the intersection of race and sexual assault and a mock presidential debate — but they fell through. Both events occurred later in the semester. “We did have a lot of mishaps, and there’s no excuse for that,” Robinson said. “There’s no excuse that we had four events planned and two fell through. That was a week before. We packaged it as a four-event week and then a week before, turns out some things had to be changed.”In spite of the scheduling issues, Robinson said he thought the week was a success, in terms of starting dialogue on campus, a sentiment that Blais echoed. “To be fair, it was the first of its kind in terms of student events, so I think it’s a good starting place and hopefully it’s continued,” she said.Robinson said that if Race Relations Week were to become an annual event, it would be a “very nice compliment” to Walk the Walk Week in January.“We really talked about a breadth of issues,” he said. “ …  It could encourage campus to talk about diversity and inclusion year-round.”Student Union representative to Diversity Council Rachel Wallace, a fifth-year, acts as a liaison between the cabinet for student government and the Diversity Council board. She said she was especially pleased with the turnout for “The Cop.” “Our target for that was really majority students and white students and thinking about ‘how do I have different biases,’ but it applied to everyone,” she said. While Wallace has worked with other student groups the last four years, she said working with student government was a “completely different experience.” “We bring a new advantage to events because we have access to more students,” she said. “We represent the whole student body. So do other groups, like Diversity Council … but sometimes people see Diversity Council and think it doesn’t apply to them. So for student government to be on an event, it’s helpful because people feel like they’re included in the conversation.“ … We program things, but we had a focus on supporting groups who have been doing this and who have expertise in the field. For example, [Multicultural Student Programs and Services] and Diversity Council have expertise on diversity and inclusion, so if we can support what they’re doing, that’s where our focus has been.”While student government is planning more programming for next semester — including an event for Walk the Walk Week and a town hall meeting  — Wallace said much of their involvement has been centered on supporting existing programming through cosponsorship. “The students who are in the trenches, doing the groundwork, we’re going to support them any way that we can,” she said. “ … We try to stand in solidarity as best as we can, with the presence the student body has authentically built up.”As someone who is involved in both student government and Diversity Council, Wallace said each side has different goals for next semester. “One thing [to improve on] from the senate perspective, that I agree with, is bringing in people who might not be interested inherently,” she said. “We’re hitting an audience with these events, but they’re people who already care about these issues, who are already actively involved, and we want to figure out how to reach the general student body. “ … I know from the Diversity Council perspective, one thing we want is more action based on the dialogue we’re having. One thing we’re interested is to partner with other organizations to take action on these issues and not just talk about them forever.”Diversity and inclusion are critical to forming the community of Notre Dame, Robinson said. “I think Fr. Jenkins said it the best,” he said. “Notre Dame is for all students and if we don’t do that, we’re not Notre Dame. We’re either all Notre Dame or none of us are Notre Dame.”Tags: 2016 Student Government Insider, DACA, Diversity, diversity council, inclusion, police brutality, Race Relations Week, Student governmentlast_img read more

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Citizens Bank adds 24 ATMs in Vermont

first_imgCitizens Financial Group, Inc. today announced it is partnering with leading self-service provider EDC to brand nearly 600 ATMs at Cumberland Farms convenience store locations in New England and the Mid-Atlantic, as well as some locations in Florida, including 24 in Vermont. The ATMs will be surcharge-free for all Citizens Bank and Charter One customers.The breakdown of Cumberland Farms ATM locations is: Connecticut (60), Delaware (10), Florida (62), Maine (37), Massachusetts (194), New Hampshire (49), New Jersey (16), New York (75), Pennsylvania (12), Rhode Island (44), and Vermont (24).“We are proud to expand customer convenience through this partnership with Cumberland Farms and EDC,” said Vice Chairman Martin Bischoff, who heads Consumer and Business Banking at Citizens Financial Group. “By partnering with a popular convenience store chain such as Cumberland Farms, we are providing our customers the flexibility to access their money at even more locations throughout New England and the Mid-Atlantic. We are committed to providing our customers the ability to bank when and where it is convenient for them.”The new, withdrawal-only ATMs will display the Citizens Bank logo on the ATMs, welcome screen and receipts. The majority of the new Citizens Bank-branded ATMs will be located in New England and the Mid-Atlantic regions, making banking more convenient for CFG customers in Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island and Vermont. The remaining Citizens Bank-branded ATMs will be located in Florida.Installation of the ATMs began in June and is expected to be completed by September 2010. The ATMs are owned and operated by EDC, one of the largest and most recognized nationwide service providers.The additional ATMs at Cumberland Farms convenience stores will bring the total number of ATMs available to Citizens Bank and Charter One customers to nearly 3,800. In March, Citizens announced a similar partnership with EDC and Sunoco to brand ATMs at nearly 500 Sunoco APlus Convenience Stores in 13 states throughout the East Coast. The additional ATMs at Sunoco APlus Convenience Stores are now available to customers.Cumberland Farms is one of the nation’s largest family-owned convenience store chains. Operating in 11 states, its mission is to make life easier for its on-the-go consumers with its trademark Farmhouse Blend coffee and Chill Zone beverages, as well as fresh food, dairy products,snacks and gasoline.“The addition of Citizens Bank ATMs in our stores is a natural way for us to make life a little easier for our customers,” said Mr. Ari Haseotes, president of Cumberland Farms Retail Division. The flexibility and convenience offered by this service is a natural extension of our pledge.“We are excited to be a part of the Cumberland Farms retail store experience in conjunction with our longstanding partner Citizens Bank,” said Mark Strauch, President and CEO of EDC. “We look forward to providing an innovative, high quality experience for all visitors to the Cumberland Farms stores and we’re proud to have been selected by such a high profile and prestigious brand name in the convenience store market.”CFG is committed to convenience. It is the second-largest in-store banker in the nation, providing customers access to seven-day bankingand extended weekday hours at nearly 475 full-service locations inside grocery stores and other retail locations.About Citizens Financial Group, Inc.Citizens Financial Group, Inc. is a $144 billion commercial bank holding company. It is headquartered in Providence, R.I., and, through its subsidiaries, has more than 1,500 branches and approximately 22,700 employees. Its two bank subsidiaries are RBS Citizens, N.A. and Citizens Bank of Pennsylvania. They operate a 12-state branch network under the Citizens Bank brand in Connecticut, Delaware, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island and Vermont, and the Charter One brand in Illinois, Michigan and Ohio. CFG has non-branch retail and commercial offices in about 40 states. CFG is owned by RBS (The Royal Bank of Scotland Group plc). CFG’s Web site is citizensbank.com.About Cumberland FarmsCumberland Farms makes life easier for busy people every day. Its network of convenience stores across 11 states reflect the values of three generations of providing customers with value, convenience and unparalleled service – whether you’re buying a cold Chill Zone drink, a hot cup of Farmhouse Blend Coffee or filling the gas tank. Rooted in a family-farm heritage today’s Cumberland Farms also has a long heritage of giving back to the communities where it operates. For more information about a Cumberland Farms near you, please visit us at www.CumberlandFarms.com(link is external).About EDCEDC, headquartered in Walnut Creek, CA, is one of the largest non-bank service providers in the United States, with approximately 4,000 turnkey ATMs and self-service kiosks in its nationwide network. EDC operates in all 50 states, processing millions of transactions each month. The company has a proven track record of providing innovative financial services programs for large retailers, regional banks, and independent merchants whose customers want a quick, convenient, and affordable way to access cash, pay bills, and cash checks.  Source: Citizens. 8.4.2010last_img read more

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Ruth Hunger, 85, Versailles

first_imgRuth E. Hunger, 85, of Versailles passed away at 4:15pm, Thursday, April 12, 2018 at Thornton Terrace in Hanover. She was born near Versailles on December 18, 1932 the daughter of Edward and Norma Lomatsch Swingle. Ruth spent her entire life near her birthplace and on May 12, 1956 she was united in marriage to Willard Keith Hunger and he preceded her in death on October 26, 2012. Survivors include two sons Kenny (Timothy Moore) Hunger of Columbus, Ohio, and Gary (Annette) Hunger of Greensburg; two daughters Brenda Goerlitz of Hanover, and Ellen (Larry) Siebert of Batesville; five grandchildren Emily (Corey) McDarment of Madison, Philip (Erin) Baker of Greensburg, Clare Siebert of Batesville, and Madelyn and Clay Hunger of Greensburg, and also 4 great-grandchildren. She was also preceded in death by her parents and her brother Howard Swingle. Mrs. Hunger was a 1951 graduate of Versailles High School. She was a homemaker and was a former employee of the Jefferson Proving Ground. She was a lifetime member of the St. Paul Lutheran Church in Olean where she played the church organ for 70 years. She also participated in the WELC at church and served in other various capacities. Ruth’s greatest love besides her family was music and she served her community by playing for numerous weddings and funerals over the years. Ruth was also a member of the Ripley County Harmonettes. Funeral services will be held on Tuesday, April 17th at 11am at the St. Paul Lutheran Church in Olean with Pastor Curtis Black officiating. Burial will be in the church cemetery. Visitation will be on Monday from 5pm to 8pm at the Stratton-Karsteter Funeral Home in Versailles. Memorials may be given to the St. Paul Lutheran Church or cemetery in care of the funeral home.last_img read more

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HapaSC redefines race and ethnicity

first_imgThe social community club, HapaSC, is repurposing the question of race and ethnicity to allow students of mixed ethnicities to define themselves in their own terms.HapaSC is hosting The Hapa Project on Trousdale Parkway from March 31 to April 2 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. to open up conversations about stereotypes and foster respectful conversations about race.Students can take pictures and write their own definition of who they are on the picture.Jamie Kwong, communications manager of HapaSC, sees the pictures as a platform for those with a multicultural background to define themselves.“People should be able to define themselves and not have to be asked what they are,” Kwong said.  “It’s important on such a diverse campus to kind of include the third race into all that goes on at USC already.”The Hapa photo book, created by the artist Kip Fulbeck, inspired Aly Tsui, the president of HapaSC, and Elisabeth Gilmore, vice president, to bring the Hapa Project to USC.Fulbeck began the project in 2001 to photograph over 1,200 volunteers throughout the nation who identify as Hapa. HapaSC saw the effect the project had and wanted to replicate that effect at USC.Tsui said that there are many ways to define yourself and there is no right or wrong answer.“When people ask you ‘what are you?’ there are so many ways that you can respond that may or may not be what they’re looking for,” Tsui said.“By doing it in a way like this we’re giving the student the power to find out themselves,” Gilmore said.As a club dedicated to inclusivity, HapaSC was created to connect multiracial students and to create an environment where members can openly discuss what being multiethnic means to them.“I think [the purpose of HapaSC is] having a community like this on campus where those people that kind of fit into this, kind of fit into that, but don’t really fit in to either, can come and have a place to call home,” Kwong said.HapaSC was formed to create a safe space for multicultural students to discuss their experiences.“Friendship is something we really want to focus on because I think the friendship level is where barriers start to get broken down,” Gilmore said. “It’s also about raising awareness for people of how to be more respectful when talking about those types of things, or also acknowledging that it even exists.  I think a lot of people categorize it that they’re so exotic or cool but, it’s still an ‘other’ not an ‘us.’”Each week HapaSC focuses on different ethnic mixes to break down barriers between ethnicities.  The goal is to create a collective consciousness to beat the identity crisis, as students of mixed ethnicities are sometimes pressured to choose between one of their identities.“I think most people that come from a unitary race background don’t necessarily comprehend what it’s like to grow up with two very distinct cultures. It is a really interesting experience growing up because you’re constantly balancing obligations and expectations from two sides of your family or maybe even more than that,” Tsui said.HapaSC serves as a resource for multicultural students to explore their mixed backgrounds and experiences, discuss the growing presence of multicultural people in society and provide service opportunities catered to serving those in the Hapa community.“We want to address a segment of society that is not talked about as much and is not really given the credit it necessarily deserves,” Tsui said.last_img read more

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