New appointments at British Lung Foundation Scotland

first_img Tagged with: Management Recruitment / people Wendy Halley has been appointed as the Development Officer for Scotland. Her main focus will be supporting and developing the network of patient-based voluntary Breathe Easy support groups. There are currently nine groups in Scotland and the team wants to triple this number in the future. Wendy joins from Scottish Screen, the national organisation for film and television, where she spent six and a half years as Human Resources Manager. Two new fundraising appointments have been announced at British Lung Foundation Scotland.Andrew Powrie-Smith will be managing the team as Head of the British Lung Foundation Scotland. He will oversee raising public awareness on lung illness, develop fundraising strategies and make the voices heard of people in Scotland living with a lung illness.Andrew comes from the British Red Cross where he was Head of Corporate Partnerships in Scotland for four years, and has also worked for a fundraising consultancy. Advertisement  29 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThiscenter_img New appointments at British Lung Foundation Scotland Howard Lake | 5 May 2003 | News About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

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Landrum starts 10th season as IMCA contingency sponsor

first_imgMENTONE, Ind. (Feb. 25) – Landrum Performance Springs gives contingency awards to drivers in four divi­sions this season, its milestone 10th as a marketing partner with IMCA. IMCA Xtreme Motor Sports Modified, IMCA Sunoco Stock Car, Karl Chevrolet Northern SportMod and Scoggin-Dickey Parts Center Southern SportMod drivers competing with four Landrum-manufac­tured springs get product certificate awards. Certificates to buy one spring and get a second of equal value free go to the top three eligible finish­ers in each of the five Modified regions and both Stock Car regions, and to the top three eligi­ble competitors in national Northern SportMod and Southern SportMod standings.“Despite a hiatus of eight years in the previous decade, Landrum has returned to IMCA prominence and is one of four companies to celebrate 10 years of partnership in 2014,” IMCA Marketing Director Kevin Yoder said. “Hopefully we can recognize that accomplishment and reward a full contingent of winners using Landrum springs at the conclusion of the racing season.”Drivers in all four divisions must display two of the Mentone, Ind., company’s decals on their race car and return a sign-up form to the IMCA home office by Aug. 1.Awards will be presented during the national IMCA banquet in November or mailed from the IMCA home office beginning the following week.More information about Landrum-made springs is available at the www.landrumspring.com web­site or by calling 800 424-0244.last_img read more

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Second win of the season for QPR.

first_imgBut it’s now five defeats in a row for Villa. QPR are no longer propping up the Premier League table. They’re off the bottom after beating Aston Villa 2-nil at Loftus Road. Charlie Austin scored twice to relieve the pressure on QPR manager Harry Redknapp.last_img

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Ice Volcano Seen on Titan

first_imgPlanetary scientists are reporting the possible discovery of an ice volcano on Saturn’s large moon Titan.  A large circular feature, 18 miles across, appears to have a caldera at the top, is surrounded by stress fractures, and appears warmer than the surroundings (warmer, relatively speaking: the mean surface temperature is -290° F).  The infrared pictures are somewhat indistinct due to the smoggy haze that obstructs views of the surface.    The discovery, announced in Nature,1,2 might explain the origin of the methane observed in Titan’s atmosphere.  The paper states that “a widespread methane ocean does not exist” on the surface.  Instead, cryovolcanism might provide a mechanism that could resupply the methane from below.  See also press releases from the Cassini website, JPL and the BBC.  [email protected] remarks that scientists were disappointed to find that Titan is as dry as a bone.1Louise Prokter, “Planetary science: Shades of Titan,” Nature 435, 749-750 (9 June 2005) | doi: 10.1038/435749a.2Sotin et al., “Release of volatiles from a possible cryovolcano from near-infrared imaging of Titan,” Nature 435, 786-789 (9 June 2005) | doi: 10.1038/nature03596.The lack of oceans of ethane and methane was a huge disappointment and surprise to planetary scientists.  They know that atmospheric methane is destroyed by the solar wind in short order – 100 million years as an upper limit (that’s only 1/45 the assumed age of Titan).  But they also expected the photolysis of methane to lead to the accumulation of hydrocarbons on the surface in the form of huge deposits of liquids.    Another surprise is the rarity of impact craters.  What keeps the methane supplied, and what keeps the surface smoothed over for long ages, are now major puzzles for those accustomed to thinking in terms of billions of years.  Trying to get all that methane out of one volcano seems a stretch.  Even with hundreds of such vents, how long could that continue?    The thought of a volcano erupting ice onto the surface of an alien moon, though, is pretty cool.(Visited 4 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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CSIR Conference focuses on SMME programmes

first_imgDelegates heard about the growth of and challenges in the industries relating to science and innovation at the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research’s sixth biannual conference in Pretoria.Besides various panel discussions, the CSIR Conference features live demonstrations of CSIR-developed technologies that are benefitting an array of sectors from mining to energy, to aerospace and defence. (Image: CSIR, Facebook)Melissa JavanA total of 181 new permanent jobs were created through 22 enterprises that were supported by the Biomanufacturing Industry Development Centre (BIDC) programme of the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), said Daniel Visser, a speaker at the biannual CSIR Conference.The two-day event, taking place on 5 and 6 October, was held at the CSIR International Convention Centre in Pretoria. The theme of the conference was “Ideas that work for industrial development”.CSIR CEO Dr Thulani Dlamini said the event celebrated some of the work the council undertook with public and private sector partners to contribute to industrial development.Developing biomanufacturing in South AfricaThe BIDC programme had supported many small-, medium and micro enterprises (SMMEs) in South Africa, mostly in Gauteng, said Visser, research and development strategy manager at the CSIR. “The majority of the SMMEs we’ve supported are black owned.”They include OptimusBio, which creates an industrial biologics product; Mamoa Trading Enterprise, which creates a cosmetics product; Sliek, which creates lactose-free products; and Golden Goose, which creates a traditional beverage product.Since 2013, the BIDC has trained 72 interns – between 20 and 25 interns per year. The programme has also created 201 temporary jobs and 20 permanent staff are employed. A total of 75 new products were transferred to enterprises.According to the council, the programme provides access to infrastructure, expertise and skilled human capital. The initiative is in line with the Department of Trade and Industry’s Industrial Policy Action Plan and the Department of Science and Technology’s Bioeconomy Strategy.Biomanufacturing is a small sector, said Visser, although it crossed a lot of industries.South Africa’s global competitivenessThe UK and South Africa had a lot of similarities when it came to the bioeconomy sector, said Kris Wadrop, director of industrial biotechnology and biorefining in that country’s Centre for Process Innovation.He was speaking in the “Industrial development of SMMEs in the bioeconomy sector” session. “What Christo (Fourie) of the Industrial Development Corporation said is applicable to the UK. We seem to be learning and going through the same experiences all over the world.”His company was a bit like the CSIR. “It’s not as big as the CSIR, but it is has four business units.”Wadrop advised that collaborations were very important when it came to bringing an idea to product, and then the product to market. “You need a lot of different skills to get that product to the market. If an SMME only has two staff members, it’s going to be difficult to finish the project (if you do not collaborate with others).”Visser and Wadrop were also on the panel discussion “Local pharmaceutical manufacturing: what can South Africa’s competitive advantage be?”.On that panel, Makekele Sono-Tladi, managing director of Elvema Nutrition, said SMMEs needed to master the route to commercialisation of a product. “You need to educate the consumers before you even take the product to the (shop’s) shelves. You need to introduce the product to the people.“This industry can be booming if we just master the commercialisation route.”Regarding funding, Dr Sibongile Gumbi, founder and CEO of iVac Biotherapeutics, said: “Be strategic in how you are going to get funding. We were fortunate enough to get funding from a private investor.”Ross Norton, chairman of the chemical company SA Bioproducts, said the “Overseas is better than local” mindset of consumers should be addressed. “We should challenge local people who don’t want to buy local goods.”Panel discussion on what role can science, technology and innovation play in industrial development #CSIRconf2017 pic.twitter.com/pQsg1LoUpa— CSIR (@CSIR) October 5, 2017Minister of trade and industry giving the key note address #CSIRConf2017 pic.twitter.com/eRR1v7m8Rk— Green-STEMfoundation (@Green_STEMorg) October 5, 2017Get more children in to the ECD centres #CSIRConf2017 Sizwe Nxasana— Khethiwe Ngema (@KGN9) October 5, 2017What to do with chicken feather waste…interesting applications explained by Prof Bruce Sithole #CSIRConf2017 pic.twitter.com/1GeFPOZB7j— Dr Lorren Haywood (@LorrenHaywood) October 5, 2017Reduce the barriers to access in the biotech industry, especially for startups – Dr Gumbi #CSIRConf2017— Bathong Wena… (@TheeRorisang) October 5, 2017Minister Pandor of @dstgovza compliments @CSIR on 72nd anniversary & challenges experts to drive ‘transformative innovations’ #CSIRConf2017— GrowSA (@GrowSANet) October 5, 2017Source: Council for Scientific and Industrial ResearchWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

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What to Charge for Videography Projects: A Handy Guide

first_imgGear, travel expenses, the editing process — we discuss how to calculate just how much your video services are worth to potential clients.So here you are. You’ve gone to film school (or you’ve done your homework, learning from online resources and YouTube tutorials). You know your craft. You have your camera. You have your gear. You’re ready to take on real, paying work in film and video production.But, what do you charge?If you ask around (and even check around online), you’re bound to get many different answers. Plus, for better or worse, many clients may preemptively tell you what your services are worth. (Hopefully they don’t just say “exposure!”)The real answer, though, is personal. Here’s how you can begin to calculate it. And while this guide will help, it might not be exact. That’s good, though, because it’ll help you determine your precise worth — as well as how to explain it to potential clients.What Is Your Time Worth?Image by Elizaveta Galitckaia.This is the biggest variable, and it changes from person to person. At the end of the day, if you take on a project and devote hours, days, or weeks to a client, you need to have an idea what your time is worth.Your time should mean something to you. Not only is your time a representation of all the hard work you’ve put in so far — learning your craft and developing your skill-set — it also represents all the avenues of other work, development, and leisure that you’re missing out on by taking on a job.A number I’ve often come across has been something in the ballpark of $600 a day for a competent video professional. Usually you can divide work terms into full- or half-day gigs (so $600 full or $300 half). But those numbers can be confusing, and people might assume it includes things like cameras, gear, travel, and expenses (which it shouldn’t — more on those below).How Much Does Your Camera Cost?In today’s professional video market, many videographers must provide their own camera and gear for shoots. This is all well and good for most, but sadly, it often creates work agreements that neglect the value of said equipment. Almost as if we’re all supposed to naturally exist with thousands of dollars in equipment that magically paid for itself.If you’re taking on video work that requires you to provide your own camera and gear, those things cost money, so you should account for them in your fee. One of the easiest and most accurate ways to find a good rate to charge for your cameras is to simply look up the cost of renting said camera from an online rental house or agency.This can also be helpful because you can send this link to your client to demonstrate what your gear is worth. (And sometimes you’ll need to work this way if you don’t own a camera, or need a specific one that you don’t own.)How Much Have You Invested in Your Gear?Image by GavranBoris.Along with a camera, you’ll need to find a price that reflects the rest of the gear you’re including. If your client is asking for specific things like recording audio or professional lighting setups, you’re well within your rights to include the costs of the gear this requires. Price it as if you were going to rent it.However, if your client is being vague or looking to work cheap — just because you might want to include your nice three-point lighting setup or new fancy drone for some shots — don’t be surprised if your client balks at paying for those things. Be prepared to explain why you’ll need which pieces of equipment.Calculate Your Travel and ExpensesPerhaps the greatest error of omission in most professional video work is not including things like travel and expenses. For many just starting out, there’s a real pressure to work for cheap (if not for free). This might just be the way of the world in some places (and certain incidents), but eventually your value will increase, and cutting corners at your own expense won’t help you in the long run.Travel can be a big one. Not only are you talking about time spent driving hours for shoots, but also the miles on your vehicle and gas in your tank. And that’s not to mention that for every shoot that doesn’t have a fully stacked craft services smorgasbord on set, you’re just eating away at your value every time you take a meal on your own dime.The Cost of Editing (and Revisions)Image by Jacob Lund.If you’re working on a project that involves both shooting and editing (or just editing for that matter), pricing your time is just as important when working at the computer. The results are unfortunate when many editing projects are subjected to a baseline price for a “video edit.”While you have to make those deals from time to time, they can quickly devalue your hourly rate — and leave you subject to endless revisions. Your best bet is to offer an hourly rate.I’ve seen numbers ranging from $25 an hour to $75 an hour, for just basic Premiere Pro editing projects. You can be flexible, but the biggest way to ensure fair value is to be upfront about your expectations, based on the project. Even making just one small change and exporting out a new draft may take an hour, as your computer has to render and you’re left twiddling your thumbs.Cover image by Maridav.For more videography and industry advice, check out some of these articles below.Industry Insights: The Ins and Outs of Real Estate Video ProductionThe 6 Best Filmmaking Cameras Under $1,000Tips for Photographers Transitioning to VideographyIndustry Roundup: Top Destination Jobs for Videographers7 Things You Need to Start Your Own Video Production Companylast_img read more

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