Jose Llana Begins Performances in The King and I Revival on B’way

first_img Jose Llana Shall we dance? Jose Llana will begin performances as the King of Siam in Rodgers & Hammerstein’s The King and I on July 14. Llana steps in for Tony nominee Ken Watanabe and will remain in the production through September 27. Directed by Bartlett Sher, the 2015 Tony-winning revival also stars Tony winners Kelli O’Hara and Ruthie Ann Miles, and is playing at Lincoln Center’s Vivian Beaumont Theater.Llana recently starred as President Marcos in Here Lies Love opposite Miles off-Broadway. His Broadway credits include Wonderland, The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee, Flower Drum Song, Rent, Streetcorner Symphony and the 1996 production of The King and I, in which he performed the role of Lun Tha. On screen he has been seen in Hitch and Sex and the City.The King and I is set in 1860’s Bangkok and tells the story of the unconventional and tempestuous relationship that develops between the King of Siam (Llana) and Anna Leonowens (O’Hara), a British schoolteacher, whom the imperious King brings to Siam to tutor his many wives and children. The musical’s score includes Getting To Know You, Hello Young Lovers, Shall We Dance, I Have Dreamed and Something Wonderful.The cast of The King and I additionally features Ashley Park, Conrad Ricamora (who also appeared in Here Lies Love with Llana), Edward Baker-Duly, Jon Viktor Corpuz, Murphy Guyer, Jake Lucas, Paul Nakauchi and Marc Oka.Hoon Lee will begin performances as the King on September 29. View Comments Related Shows The King and I Star Files Show Closed This production ended its run on June 26, 2016last_img read more

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Number of LGBT+ elected officials in US hits new high

first_imgThe number of openly LGBT+ elected officials in the United States grew by more than a fifth in the past year, according to a survey published on Thursday, with a record high of some 840 gay, lesbian, bi and trans people in office across the country.The report from the LGBTQ Victory Institute comes as an historically high number of gay and trans people – more than 880 – are running for office this year, the US political advocacy group said.“When LGBTQ elected officials are in the halls of power, they change the hearts and minds of their lawmaker colleagues, defeat anti-LGBTQ bills and inspire more inclusive legislation,” said former Houston Mayor Annise Parker, the group’s president. Among the most high-profile LGBT+ candidates in recent months was Pete Buttigieg, the former mayor of South Bend, Indiana who was the first openly gay man to run for the White House. He bowed out of the race in March.In New York, two openly gay Black candidates are on track to win seats in the US Congress, a first for the nation.Democrat Mondaire Jones has declared his victory following a party primary in a New York suburb, and fellow Democrat Ritchie Torres is favored to represent the South Bronx neighborhood in Congress next year.Last year, 698 openly LGBT+ people held US elected office, according to the Victory Institute, an increase of 25% compared with June 2018. This June, the number rose to 843, it said. Despite this progress, advocates noted that gay and trans people hold 0.17% of elected positions nationwide while making up 4.5% of the US adult population.“The numbers in this report show LGBTQ political power is growing rapidly,” said Parker in emailed comments.“But it also demonstrates the daunting representation gap that we must close and is a call-to-action for all in our community to consider a run for office.”The Victory Institute found bisexual representation increased by 53% in the last year, while the number of trans women elected officials grew by 40%, although there was no increase in trans men voted into office.The report also found the number of openly LGBT+ mayors increased by 35%, while the number of state legislators increased to 160 in June from 147 in June 2019.Last year’s surge is part of a longer nationwide trend, according to the Victory Institute, with an 88% increase in openly LGBT+ elected officials since November 2017. Topics :last_img read more

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Washington NFL team scandal evokes strong reaction from women in sports: ‘This isn’t isolated’

first_img“These matters as reported are serious, disturbing and contrary to the NFL’s values,” the league’s statement read. “Everyone in the NFL has the right to work in an environment free from any and all forms of harassment.”MORE: Will NFL force out Washington owner Dan Snyder?The Association for Women in Sports Media also released a statement urging the Washington team to “allow past and present employees to participate in a third-party investigation without fear of reprisals.” Former Washington staffer Emily Applegate, The Athletic’s Rhiannon Walker and The Ringer’s Nora Princiotti spoke to The Post on the record, but 14 other women spoke anonymously out of fear the organization could take legal action after some of them signed nondisclosure agreements. On Thursday night, The Washington Post released an extensive report detailing years of alleged sexual harassment against 15 women who previously worked for the Washington NFL team as well as two reporters who covered the team. The Post’s reporting revealed a toxic culture in which female employees were regularly subjected to inappropriate comments and touching from their male colleagues.Washington has hired outside attorneys to conduct a thorough investigation of the allegations, according to a statement released by the NFL, and the league may take action based on the findings of that investigation. pic.twitter.com/BrZ9nnLQko— AWSM (@AWSM_SportMedia) July 16, 2020″AWSM salutes the 15 brave women and numerous other sources who spoke with the Washington Post about sexual and verbal harassment they endured while working for the Washington NFL team,” the statement read. “We are especially proud of two AWSM members who spoke on the record about their experiences.”The Post’s outstanding journalism highlights how far we have to go in order to provide equality for women working in sports media.”For many women working in sports, reading about these experiences was both painful and familiar. The story brought on an outpouring of justifiable anger, frustration, sadness and support for those in the industry who have been forced to deal with harassment in the workplace.Rhiannon Walker, The AthleticI want to genuinely thank Will and @lizclarketweet for their care in reporting this story. I encourage people to read their thorough report about the culture the women in this piece, including myself, were subjected to. https://t.co/7OGKoB8qqi— Rhiannon Walker (@InstantRHIplay) July 17, 2020I want you all to know what it feels like to be sexually harassed on the job. I want you to know what it feels like speaking up. But more importantly, I hope that my speaking up helps other women navigate a situation like this. https://t.co/LrTpbH2plG— Rhiannon Walker (@InstantRHIplay) July 17, 2020Nora Princiotti, The RingerThis is important work from @TheWillHobson and @lizclarketweet that I hope will lead to change. https://t.co/wTP6y02Kdt— Nora Princiotti (@NoraPrinciotti) July 16, 2020Karisa Maxwell, DAZN/Sporting NewsNow that I’ve had a few hours to digest the Washington Post story, let me just say as a woman working in sports…Yeah. Sexual assault, harassment and misogyny are extremely prevalent and I am so damn tired of reading these stories and finding them more relatable than shocking.— Karisa Maxwell (@KarisaMaxwell) July 17, 2020Katlyn Gambill, Los Angeles KingsSupport women in sports.Don’t be a bystander to sexual misconduct in sports because “it’s just a boy’s club.” I promise this isn’t an isolated incident to one organization or sport.— Katlyn Gambill (@KatlynGambill) July 16, 2020Katherine Terrell, The AthleticThis story makes me think of the many, many, many conversations I’ve had with other women while doing this job. Did we wear the wrong thing? Did we say the wrong thing? Should we have approached it differently? In the end, we always end up blaming ourselves and that needs to stop— Katherine Terrell (@Kat_Terrell) July 16, 2020Amy Elizabeth, Charlotte HornetsBeing a woman in sports means having to wait to go to HR until you have a list of 20+ incidents, even though one incident of sexism/harassment should be enough.— Amy Elizabeth (@amonksy_) July 17, 2020Courtney Robb, WCBI SportsLet’s not sexually harass women at work. Let’s not sexually harass women at the gym. Let’s not sexually harass women at the grocery store. Let’s not sexually harass women at the gas station. Let’s not sexually harass women on the street. Let’s. NOT. Sexually. Harass. ANYONE.— Courtney Robb (@courtkrobb) July 16, 2020Blair Berry, Washington WizardsDisgusted.Women should not, I repeat, SHOULD NOT have to tolerate sexual harassment just so they can have a career in sports.— Blair Berry (@BlairB3rry) July 16, 2020Taylor Stern, Dallas CowboysIf you don’t think it’s an issue, then why is “What’s it like working in a man’s world?” still such a common question.Listen to women. Believe women. Support women.— Taylor Stern (@TayStern) July 17, 2020Christine Brennan, USA TodayAllegations of sexual harassment are not new for the Washington NFL team. It happened to me, too, when I covered the team for @washingtonpost from 1985 through the 1988 Super Bowl. My @usatodaysports column: https://t.co/zteRczHUzX— Christine Brennan (@cbrennansports) July 17, 2020Taylor Rooks, Bleacher ReportMy heart is with all women in sports. Many of us are the only women in the room majority of the time. That comes with a great deal of challenges. Stories like we read today highlight a harassment problem that needs to be addressed universally. No one should have to deal with that— Taylor Rooks (@TaylorRooks) July 17, 2020Tessa Mortensen, Miami HurricanesSupport women in sports.Support women. Period.Uplift women in sports.Uplift women. Period.Treat women in sports with respect.Treat women with respect. Period.I promise. It’s not hard.— Tessa Mortensen (@tessamort) July 17, 2020Alli Pinter, Philadelphia 76ersThis is not isolated to Washington. This is not unique to the NFL. Almost every woman I know has their own set of storiesBut we’ve put up with it on a daily basis. Out of fear of losing jobs. Out of fear of not being taken seriously. It’s fucked up and it needs to end. Now— Alli Pinter (@allipinter) July 17, 2020Had a boss say that I was hired to look pretty, not to have ideas. The inappropriate touching & sexual remarks are why I stopped dressing up on gameday. The constant quizzing bc men refuse to believe that a woman is behind their fav team’s socialThis is the tip of the iceberg— Alli Pinter (@allipinter) July 17, 2020I can’t begin to explain the mental toll of being constantly belittled and harassed in the workplace takes on you.How it feels to know that this culture is so deeply embedded into this industry, that nothing you say can change it.— Alli Pinter (@allipinter) July 17, 2020We’ve been talking for a while. Maybe now y’all will start to listen and change shit.— Alli Pinter (@allipinter) July 17, 2020Rana Cash, Savannah NowI’ve had my head down all day. Come up for air only to see this. 😡 Is it so hard to just be decent, professional and respectful?! https://t.co/LY9slUJ1i2— Rana Cash (@rana_cash) July 16, 2020Linsday Jones, The AthleticAlso …. it’s not just Washington. Ask any woman who has worked in / covered the NFL. This isn’t isolated.— Lindsay Jones (@bylindsayhjones) July 16, 2020The tweets teasing this WaPo story show you how many people, mainly men, in this business knew what was happening. Step up. Speak out when you see it. Be real allies.— Lindsay Jones (@bylindsayhjones) July 16, 2020I am so proud of my colleague @InstantRHIplay and my friend @NoraPrinciotti for sharing their experiences. You’re not alone and we support you, 100%.— Lindsay Jones (@bylindsayhjones) July 16, 2020Arielle Chambers, Bleacher ReportProb w/ sexual harassment, esp w/ women in sport, is silence bc of fear due to the “exclusiveness” of the job. That article made me sick to my stomach. I – WE – know how it feels to keep quiet for fear of being replaced. To those brave women who continue to speak out, WE GOT YOU! pic.twitter.com/GLJY0oJ5yJ— Arielle (Ari) Chambers (@ariivory) July 17, 2020Alyssa Purser, Mountain West ConferenceI’m terrified about speaking out on a public platform about the mistreatment of women in sports.but I’m more terrified of what happens to our industry when men’s behavior continues to go unchecked.— Alyssa Purser (@AlyssaPurser) July 17, 2020last_img read more

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