Concerns about vaping health effects rise as hospitalizations increase

first_imgFacebook World Oceans Day shines spotlight on marine plastic pollution Benton McDonald is a senior journalism and political science double major from Austin, Texas. He has worked for TCU360 since his freshman year and is currently the executive editor. Board approves tuition freeze, RRI actions but doesn’t act on eligibility issue spurred by Williams Thousands of TCU community members receive COVID-19 vaccines as university supply increases printJUUL is the most popular brand of e-cigarette on the market (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)UPDATE: A previous version of this article said that the TCU Pharmacy would provide Chantix to students looking for help with their nicotine addiction. The Pharmacy will only provide the prescription if students present a valid prescription from their physician. No matter where you are on campus, someone around you likely has an e-cigarette. While TCU’s campus is smoke-free, many students get their nicotine fix every day without lighting it up. The use of devices like the JUUL, an e-cigarette the size of a flash drive that emits small clouds of odorless smoke, has skyrocketed over the last decade, with sales increasing by 641 percent from 2016 and 2017, according to the CDC. But what began as a social activity in places like the high school bathroom has now become an addictive and harmful habit for many. One TCU student, who wished to remain anonymous for this story, experienced sharp stomach pains each morning before he hit his JUUL and has since quit. The student said he was smoking “a pod or more” of e-cigarette vapor each day. The nicotine content in one JUUL pod is equivalent to that of a pack of cigarettes, according to JUUL. Many students don’t realize the addictive and harmful effects of e-cigarettes when they first start using them, according to Brad Stewart, the associate director of the TCU Wellness Center.  “They think, ‘Well I just use it socially, like on the weekends partying, I’ll have my JUUL,’ but a lot of times what they don’t realize is that they can become severely addicted to nicotine even from casual usage just once or twice a week,” he said. “And then they start to realize that they’re having more cravings and more cravings.”The rise of e-cigarette usage is not unique to TCU. More than 3 million high school students reported vaping in 2018, according to a study released by the CDC. Among that group, 27.7 percent reported vaping more than 20 days a month. E-cigarette use has increased since the CDC first began tracking the data in 2011. Image courtesy: CDC “Over the last 4 years we’ve seen epidemic levels of increases in JUUL specifically and e-cigarette use in youth,” Stewart said. While the student whom TCU 360 spoke to quit before his health issues worsened, the same is not true for a growing number of people nationwide. A recent rise in vaping-related cases, which has jumped from 94 to 215 in recent weeks, according to CDC press releases, is leaving doctors and health experts without many answers. “Nobody has any idea why all the sudden there’s so much of it going on,” said Dr. Karen Schultz, the medical director of pulmonology at Cook Children’s Health Care System. “It’s baffled everybody.”A Fort Worth-area teen was hospitalized for 18 days at Cook Children’s this past summer, 10 of which were spent in a medically-induced coma with a breathing tube down his throat. While his doctors can’t say with certainty, they believe the failure of his lungs was caused in part by his vaping habit. While this case was the first they had seen at Cook Children’s, Schultz said she has seen an increase in the number of emergency room patients who reported chest pain and shortness of breath due to vaping in the past few months. “Those kids are getting hooked on that stuff, and it’s going to be as hard to come off vaping e-cigarettes as it is coming off of regular cigarettes,” she said. “It’s the same dependency of your body.”The number of e-cigarette users has continued to rise despite a clear knowledge about what products like JUUL contain and how harmful they are to one’s body. “We don’t know what the real dangers are,” she said of e-cigarettes. “It has been around, I think, 10 or 12 years now. It took decades for us to realize the dangers of smoking.” To prevent students from experiencing these life-threatening symptoms, TCU is looking to provide resources for anyone who find themselves with the unwanted habit. The TCU pharmacy will provide Chantix to students who receive a prescription from their doctor and Stewart said they are open to starting group cessation classes in the future.  “We want students to start to realize the damage that they’re causing to their lungs and esophagus,” he said. Another resource the university will lean on is the new smoking age that went into effect Sept. 1, when Texas joined 17 other states in raising the legal age to buy and use tobacco products to 21. Both Stewart and Schultz supported the change but saw it as the first of many steps toward lowering the number of young smokers. “If you’re still choosing to do that, you made that choice for yourself, but we’re not going to create an environment on campus or in the state or in the community that makes that easy for that damage and negative impact to happen to everyone around you,” Stewart said.  Benton McDonald Twitter Settlement reached between TCU, former professor in discrimination lawsuit Benton McDonaldhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/benton-mcdonald/ Linkedin Previous articleHoroscope: September 9, 2019Next articleCity proposes price increase for golf yearly passes Benton McDonald RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Twitter Chancellor talks stimulus money, COVID-19 vaccines and more at limited attendance faculty town hall TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history Benton McDonaldhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/benton-mcdonald/ Benton McDonaldhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/benton-mcdonald/ + posts Facebook Linkedin Benton McDonaldhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/benton-mcdonald/ Welcome TCU Class of 2025 JUUL is the most popular brand of e-cigarette on the market (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File) ReddIt ReddItlast_img read more

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Upper Corentyne in control after openers post unbroken 201 stand

first_img– West Berbice whip Georgetown by eight wicketsOPENERS Kandasammy Surujnarine and Balchand Baldeo shared in a stunning unbroken stand of 201, as Upper Corentyne closed the penultimate day of their sixth round Guyana Cricket Board (GCB) Franchise League three-day cricket tournament against East Bank in a commanding position, with an overall lead of 223 runs.Surujnarine is unbeaten on 109 while Baldeo was on 75 when play ended at the Port Mourant ground.Both batsmen batted with great fluency, and their 139 minutes at the wicket was evidence of their concentration.Surujnarine has so far hit eight fours and a six while Baldeo counted seven boundaries.Earlier, resuming at 127-3, East Bank overnight batsmen Sachin Singh and Ronaldo Ali-Mohamed extended their fourth-wicket stand, and in the process, both batsmen progressed to their respective half-century.However, as the partnership was looking ominous, spinner David Latchaya (2-21), broke the promising 98-run stand when he bowled Ali-Mohamed for 55, at 163-4. His innings lasted for 73 balls, with eight fours and a six.Singh followed immediately after, leg before wicket to leg spinner Shawn Pereira for 60. He reached the boundary on seven occasions while clearing it once in his 145-ball knock.That dismissal saw the visitors losing three quick wickets: Darshan Persaud (8), Daniel Barker (8), and Ershad Ali (10), at 206-8.Persaud was caught at first slip off Pereira; Daniel Barker caught in the covers by Clinton Pestano off Pereira, while Ali was bowled by Hooper.Colin Benn and Totaram Bishun then survived until the interval, with Benn on 19 and Bishun on three. Upon resumption Pereira completed his five-wicket haul (5-57), when he trapped Bishun leg before wicket for 14.Benn took his score to 31 before he was bowled by Latchaya. Keon Morris was left unbeaten on eight. Pestano (1-26), Hooper (1-63), and Dimitri Cameron (1-24), were the other successful bowlers.With a first innings lead of 22 runs, the hosts were then put in a commanding position by their openers.Meanwhile, at Bush Lot, West Berbice whipped Georgetown by eight wickets. The City team, faced with a first innings deficit of 75 runs, were bowled out for 151 in their second innings. Ovid Richardson (24), Martin Pestano-Bell (23), Sunil Singh (17) and captain Paul Wintz (23 not out), were the principal scorers.Bowling for the hosts, Gudakesh Motie took 5-35 while Andrew Dutchin had 3-55. When play resumed yesterday, Bush Lot took their overnight score of 226-8, to 231. Gajanan Suknanan claimed 5-75, bowling for Georgetown.Over at Young Warriors ground, West Demerara resuming from their overnight 284-7, were bowled out for 331. Tevin Imlach did not add to his overnight 119. Richie Looknauth was left unbeaten on 45. Karran Arjpaul claimed 4-56 while Kassim Khan took 3-81.Lower Corentyne in reply closed the day on 146-8. Alex Algoo is unbeaten on 61. Khan made 25 to be the next significant scorer. Bowling for West Demerara, Mahendra Dhanpaul, Keshram Seyhoden and Akshaya Persaud, each claimed two wickets.At theTuschen ground, Essequibo closed day one on four without loss, responding to East Coast 289 all out. Rajendra Chandrika 68, Joshua Persaud 56, Brian Sattuar 51, Bhaskar Yadram and Kamesh Yadram 30 runs each, were the top scorers for East Coast. Bowling for Essequibo, Anthony Adams claimed 6-81.last_img read more

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