Pesticide treatment key for crops

first_imgPests such as thrips, whiteflies, aphids, beet armyworm and hornworms can devastate vegetable crops.Potentially just as harmful, though, is the misuse of pesticides, which can lead to pest resurgence, resistance and risk the environment.Applying the proper amount of each chemical is key to sustaining vegetable productivity in Georgia, according to University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences entomologist David Riley.“Everybody is concerned about insecticide use but for different reasons,” said Riley, a researcher on the Tifton campus. “On the growers’ side, they’re looking at the price of the product. It’s expensive. They want to maximize the use of their product and get the most efficient use out of it.” On the other hand, the insecticide companies don’t want farmers to overuse their products because they are concerned that insects will become resistant. When that happens they’ll have to go back to the drawing board and spend money engineering new chemicals. These concerns led to Riley’s research into insecticide resistance in pests like whiteflies.Insecticides are an expensive tool that farmers are forced to use. Riley estimated insecticide applications cost $27 million a year — close to three percent of the value of Georgia’s vegetable production value in 2009. However, the chemical treatments applied protect one-third of the vegetable crop’s value, amounting to $302 million in state vegetable revenue.Riley studies insecticide use as part of the UGA Vegetable Entomology Project. The goal is to help farmers reap the maximum benefit from investment into pesticides. In collaboration with various chemical companies, the project’s researchers conduct pest control studies annually. The experiments test the efficiency of pesticides on cabbage, collard, cantaloupe, cucumber, tomato, pepper, onions, squash and watermelon.He is working to find a middle ground that appeases the concerns of chemical companies and farmers.“We’re just basically trying to find a happy medium where you alleviate a lot of your environmental concerns, you alleviate a lot of your concerns about, ‘Am I affecting my bees (and) pollinators? Am I keeping my productivity to a level I can live with?’” Riley said.There is no simple answer to this dilemma, Riley said. Using as much pesticide as a farmer can afford is bound to diminish the chemical’s effectiveness, put pollinators in danger and diminish the farmer’s future yields. Abandoning all pesticide use, though, may slash farmers’ productivity to below a break-even point. “I think what we’re looking at is that hard place in the middle where you try to figure out, ‘How do I use the things I need to use, the minimum use to get the maximum benefit?’” Riley said. As part of the vegetable entomology project, an effort is under way to find corrective measures in controlling cowpea curculio in southern peas. No products currently exist that can control the pest’s devastating impact which led to the collapse of pea production a couple of years ago.last_img read more

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Anderson makes 1st team

first_imgAdding to her growing list of accolades as a Wisconsin Badger, junior guard Jolene Anderson was named to the first team All-Big Ten for the first time in her career Monday.With an average of 19.3 points per game, Anderson became the first Badger woman ever to win the Big Ten scoring title. She also finished toward the top of the conference in several other categories. Anderson ended up third in the conference in free-throw shooting, making 85.4 percent of her foul shots, ninth in rebounding, with a team-best 7.2 boards per game, and third in steals, with yet another team-high 2.38 takeaways per game.”She can do everything,” Anderson’s teammate Rae Lin D’Alie said. “She can shoot, she can drive, she’s a great passer, great leader by example, and she’s got great defense.”Anderson is joined on the list by Ohio State’s Jessica Davenport, Purdue’s Katie Gearlds and Purdue’s Lindsay Wisdom-Hylton as the only players selected by both the coaches and media to the first team. The coaches selected Penn State’s Amanda Brown, while the media to the first-team tabbed Ohio State’s Brandie Hoskins.Davenport was also named Big Ten Player of the Year for the third consecutive season, the first woman to ever achieve the feat. Her coach, Jim Foster, also repeated as conference coach of the year. In her first year with UW in 2004-05, Anderson garnered Big Ten Freshman of the Year and third-team All-Big Ten honors, and last year was named to the second team All-Big Ten as a sophomore. Anderson led the Badgers in scoring and rebounding in all three of those years.She is just the ninth Wisconsin women’s player to be named to the first team.”She’s the backbone of our team and has earned every accolade that she’s been awarded,” Wisconsin head coach Lisa Stone said. “She doesn’t pay attention to them, but we do. The list does go on and on. She’s a special kid. She’s a person that always puts the team ahead of herself.”Two other Badgers were also honored Tuesday.Anderson’s teammate Janese Banks also received recognition for her season, as she was named All-Big Ten honorable mention. The junior guard is the team’s second leading scorer, averaging 13.9 points per game, which puts her in the top ten in scoring in the conference. Banks also finished fourth in the conference in offensive rebounding, bringing in 3.14 offensive boards per game.Freshman Brittany Heins also received an accolade, as she was selected by the Badger coaches as the team’s honoree for the Big Ten Sportsmanship Award, which rewards athletes for their contributions both on and off the court.”It’s quite an honor,” Heins said. “I’m just really honored that I would be thought of to get it.”last_img read more

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