Welding instructor Cathal McGee appointed to WorldSkills expert role

first_imgDonegal ETB welding instructor Cathal McGee has been appointed as a WorldSkills Ireland Expert for the skill area of Welding.The appointment comes ahead of the 45th WorldSkills competition which takes place in Kazan, Russia from 22-27 August 2019. It is the first time ever that welding staff from any ETB in the country have been appointed to this position.WorldSkills is the collective voice for skills excellence and development in vocational, technological, and service oriented careers around the globe. Every two years WorldSkills hosts the world championships of skills which attracts more than 1,600 competitors from over 60 countries. There are competitions in 56 skills across a wide range of industries.The competitors represent the best of their peers and are selected from skills competitions that are held in WorldSkills member countries and regions. Ireland’s National Skills Final took place from 21-23 March.Stranorlar native Cathal has worked with Donegal ETB for the last fifteen years.Speaking about his appointment, Cathal said, “I’m absolutely delighted with this appointment. The fact that this is the first time ever an ETB staff member has been appointed to the welding expert role makes it particularly special. The work of a WorldSkills Ireland Expert consists of preparing the Irish WorldSkills competitor is his skill area, welding in my case, training and coordinating the twelve week Special Training Programme (STP), as well as participating in the WorldSkills competition in Kazan.” Cathal McGee WorldSkills Ireland Welding Expert & Christopher Kehoe Irish WorldSkills Welding CompetitorSince 1950, WorldSkills has raised awareness among young people, as well as their parents, teachers and employers, that their future depends on an effective skills training system. The twenty largest economies in the world are Members of WorldSkills, as are the five most populous. In all, the membership represents two-thirds of the world’s population.The WorldSkills Ireland welding competitor Cathal will work with, in representing Ireland, Christopher Kehoe, was the winner of the National Skills Final, hosted by Ireland Skills Live, which took place in the RDS, Dublin from 21-23 March.Speaking about Cathal’s appointment, Cróna Gallagher, Donegal ETB’s Director of Further Education and Training (FET) said, “I’d like to congratulate Cathal on his appointment. Not only is this a huge honour for him and a testament to his own knowledge and skills, it highlights the quality of the training provided by Donegal ETB’s FET Service; we are the leading provider of welding training in the Irish further education and training sector, having been the first in Ireland to introduce augmented reality welding into our training and our staff are now leading the way on the national and international skills stage.”Cathal’s manager, Donegal ETB’s Area Training Manager Vinny McGroary, on congratulating Cathal commented, “Cathal’s appointment and his involvement in the WorldSkills competition will increase the visibility of skilled professional education. Welding comes under the Manufacturing and Engineering Technology category and the competition provides leaders in industry, government and education with the opportunity to exchange information and best practices regarding industry and professional education.”Cathal now has a busy few months ahead of him. In addition to training his competitor for the competition, he has to develop the STP for his area of welding, monitor progress of his competitor, be active on the WorldSkills Forum which requires completion of preparatory tasks and complete WorldSkills International Modules as part of his international professional development. Donegal ETB Chief Executive Anne McHugh also added her congratulations saying, “We are absolutely delighted with Cathal’s appointment. It not only highlights Cathal’s skills but highlights the quality of the teaching and learning the people of Donegal have on their own doorstep. I would like to wish him and his competitor all the best with their preparations in the coming months and good luck in Kazan.”Welding instructor Cathal McGee appointed to WorldSkills expert role was last modified: June 24th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:cathal mcgeeDonegal ETBweldinglast_img read more

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Muscle Power Is Designed, Not Evolutionary

first_imgThe wonder of muscle inspires both awe at its design and opportunities for evolutionary storytelling.Fifty years of assumptions about how muscle fibers work is being set aside, reported PhysOrg, with the discovery that its components don’t just slide in one axis, but bulge out in 3-D.   The article, titled “Biceps bulge, calves curve, 50-year-old assumptions muscled aside,” states:The basics of how a muscle generates power remain the same: Filaments of myosin tugging on filaments of actin shorten, or contract, the muscle – but the power doesn’t just come from what’s happening straight up and down the length of the muscle, as has been assumed for 50 years.Instead, University of Washington-led research shows that as muscles bulge, the filaments are drawn apart from each other, the myosin tugs at sharper angles over greater distances, and it’s that action that deserves credit for half the change in muscle force scientists have been measuring.It makes sense; if fibers stretched in only one direction, why would biceps bulge outward?  The fact that muscle fibers don’t simply slide past each other but buckle, generating forces in multiple dimensions, adds to the wonder of its design.Fish Muscle EvolutionHumans are not the only animals with muscle, of course; fish use muscles, too.  Muscle imprints from extinct fossil fish provided a backdrop for evolutionists from Australia to manufacture “A Muscular Perspective on Vertebrate Evolution,” Shigeru Kuratani wrote in Science about their paper in the same issue, “Fossil Musculature of the Most Primitive Jawed Vertebrates.”  The amazing design of muscle was less important to these evolutionists than whether or not certain fossils can be placed into an ancestral sequence.  The puzzle of how soft muscle imprints could be preserved for 400 million years was less important to them than divining phylogenetic trees from the data.Although they assumed the evolution of fish, the paper’s authors actually had little to say about evolution.  “Their evolutionary importance hinges on whether eubrachythoracid musculature is specialized or primitive relative to that of sharks” is one example of a reserved statement; another, “Hypothetical reconstructions are not able to recover the full complexity of this musculature, either on the basis of biomechanical analysis or phylogenetic bracketing, and are thus liable to give a false picture of muscular evolution at the origin of gnathostomes.”  In the end, they could only hope that future studies of “exceptionally preserved fossils will continue to provide essential data for the reconstruction of vertebrate soft anatomy, particularly in groups with no close living relatives.”Kuratani, though, couldn’t get enough evolution into his Perspective article.  In every case, though, he merely assumed evolution, without showing how the fossil actually helps establish a sequential list of lucky mutations leading to muscular fish:On page 160 this issue, Trinajstic et al. systematically describe the muscle anatomy of three fossil animals from the earliest jawed vertebrate group, the placoderms, which evolved soon after the acquisition of the jaw. Knowledge of the morphology of these earliest jawed vertebrates, especially with respect to soft tissues such as muscles, is necessary for understanding how vertebrates evolved.How vertebrates evolved:  This hypothetical scenario of neck and cucullaris muscle evolution builds on the data presented by Trinajstic et al. and uses a simplified vertebrate phylogeny.The primitive shoulder girdle in placoderms, as suggested by Trinajstic et al., may be an intermediate state of neck evolution that simultaneously reveals the beginnings of a jawed vertebrate novelty, the cucullaris.At one point, though, Kuratani was stumped.  A complex feature was found in the primitive ancestor.  His response?  He just swept aside the concern, and proceeded on with his “hypothetical scenario” –The presence of the transverse abdominal muscles in placoderms is another mysterious finding of Trinajstic et al., because this muscle has been thought to be present only in tetrapods. Phylogenetic importance or homology aside, this muscle is potentially similar to a component of the trunk muscle in tetrapods, the abaxial muscle, which also develops as the result of myoblast migration and interactions between myoblasts and the embryonic mesenchymal environment of the lateral body wall.If the muscle patterns reported by Trinajstic et al. are found to reflect the general morphology of the placoderms, it would suggest that the developmental bases for the muscle anatomy of modern jawed vertebrates were present, in primitive form, around the time of the appearance of the functional jaw. This would stimulate even greater curiosity about the anatomy of more ancient stem gnathostomes such as ostracoderms, because the beginning of the jawed vertebrate body plan is likely to be buried in the anatomy of these animals.Can “phylogenetic importance or homology” be cast aside so whimsically by an evolutionist?  Wouldn’t casting aside those matters undermine evolution itself?This exposè has been brought to you by Creation-Evolution Headlines, just the latest in its 12-year arsenal of similar examples of handwaving and pseudoscientific fabling about evolution in major scientific journals.  They can’t hide their dumbfloundering confabulations any more.  We are showing them to the world.  Flex your muscle and take up the fight to restore the truth of design to science, which these DODO dogmatists twist into mythoids about evillusion.  (For definitions of these terms, see our Darwin Dictionary.)Enjoy your muscles today.  It’s uncanny how we can order muscles to do things.  Our general orders, like orders from a general, set the armies of actin and myosin molecules in motion in ways we can’t begin to fathom from our command perspective.  Your muscles deserve good treatment.  Feed them well and give them some good healthy work to do every day, then enjoy how good they can make you look.  Finish it with sincere thanks to your Creator who granted us these wonderful systems.(Visited 14 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Photo library: Nature 13

first_img{loadposition tc}Click on a thumbnail for a low-resolution image, or right-click on the link below it to download a high-resolution copy of the image.» Download Nature contact sheet (785KB) » Download full image library contact sheet (10.5MB) Eastern Cape province: Waterfall and indigenous forest in the Tsitsikamma National Park. Photo: Rodger Bosch, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Eastern Cape province: Indigenous forest in the Tsitsikamma National Park. Photo: Rodger Bosch, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Eastern Cape province: Walkway in the Tsitsikamma National Park. Photo: Rodger Bosch, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Eastern Cape province:Erica plant in the Tsitsikamma National Park. Photo: Rodger Bosch, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Eastern Cape province: Indigenous forest in the Tsitsikamma National Park. Photo: Rodger Bosch, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Eastern Cape province: Indigenous forest in the Tsitsikamma National Park. Photo: Rodger Bosch, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Eastern Cape province:Indigenous forest in the Tsitsikamma National Park. Photo: Rodger Bosch, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Eastern Cape province: Indigenous forest in the Tsitsikamma National Park. Photo: Rodger Bosch, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Eastern Cape province: Indigenous forest in the Tsitsikamma National Park, near Storms River.Photo: Rodger BoschMediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image NATURE 13: {loadposition nature}Having trouble downloading high-resolution images? Queries about the image library? Email Janine Erasmus at [email protected]last_img read more

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Arm CT scan

first_imgDefinitionA computed tomography (CT) scan of the arm is an imaging method that uses x-rays to make cross-sectional pictures of the arm.Alternative NamesCAT scan – arm; Computed axial tomography scan – arm; Computed tomography scan – arm; CT scan – armHow the Test is PerformedYou will be asked to lie on a narrow table that slides into the center of the CT scanner.Once you are inside the scanner, the machines x-ray beam rotates around you. (Modern “spiral” scanners can perform the exam without stopping.)A computer creates separate images of the arm area, called slices. These images can be stored, viewed on a monitor, or printed on film. Three-dimensional models of the arm can be created by adding the slices together.You must be still during the exam. Movement can cause blurred images. You may be told to hold your breath for short periods of time.The scan should take only 10-15 minutes.How to Prepare for the Test For some tests, you will need to have a special dye, called contrast, to be delivered into the body before the test starts. Contrast helps certain areas show up better on the x-rays.Contrast can be given through a vein (IV) in your hand or forearm. If contrast is used, you may also be asked not to eat or drink anything for 4-6 hours before the test.Let your doctor know if you have ever had a reaction to contrast. You may need to take medicines before the test in order to safely receive this substance.Before receiving the contrast, tell your health care provider if you take the diabetes drug metformin (Glucophage). You may need to special steps if you are on this medicine.If you weigh more than 300 pounds, find out if the CT machine has a weight limit. Too much weight can cause damage to the scanners working parts.advertisementYou will be asked to remove jewelry and wear a hospital gown during the study. How the Test will FeelSome people may have discomfort from lying on the hard table.Contrast given through an IV may cause a slight burning sensation, a metallic taste in the mouth, and a warm flushing of the body. These feels are normal . They will go away within a few seconds.Why the Test is PerformedCT rapidly creates detailed pictures of the body, including the arms. The test may help detect or diagnose:An abscess or infectionThe cause of pain or other problems in the wrist, shoulder or elbow joints (usually when MRI cant be done)A broken boneMasses and tumors, including cancerA CT scan may also be used to guide a surgeon to the right area during a biopsy.Normal ResultsResults are considered normal if no problems are seen in the images.What Abnormal Results MeanAbnormal results may be due to:Abscess (collection of pus)Blood clot in the arm (deep venous thrombosis)Bone tumorsCancerBroken or fractured boneDamage to the hand, wrist, or elbow jointsRisksRisks of CT scans include:Being exposed to radiationAllergic reaction to contrast dyeCT scans expose you to more radiation than regular x-rays. Having many x-rays or CT scans over time may increase your risk for cancer. However, the risk from any one scan is small. You and your doctor should weigh this risk against the benefits of getting a correct diagnosis for a medical problem.Some people have allergies to contrast dye. Let your doctor know if you have ever had an allergic reaction to injected contrast dye.The most common type of contrast given into a vein contains iodine. A person with an iodine allergy may have nausea or vomiting, sneezing, itching, or hives if given this type of contrast.If contrast is needed, your doctor may give you antihistamines (such as Benadryl) or steroids before the test.The kidneys help remove iodine out of the body. Those with kidney disease or diabetes may need to get extra fluids after the test to help flush the iodine out of the body.Rarely, the dye may cause a life-threatening allergic response called anaphylaxis. If you have any trouble breathing during the test, let the scanner operator know right away. Scanners have intercom and speakers so the operator can hear you at all times.ReferencesHuber FG. Arm. In: DeLee JC, Drez D Jr, Miller MD, eds. DeLee and Drez?s Orthopaedic Sports Medicine. 3rd ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2009:chap 18.Grainger RG, Thomsen HS, Morcos SK, Koh DM, Roditi G. Intravascular contrast media for radiology, CT, and MRI. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, eds. Grainger & Allisons Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging. 5th ed. New York, NY: Churchill Livingstone; 2008:chap 2.advertisementShaw AS, Dixon AK. Multidetector computed tomography. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, eds. Grainger & Allisons Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging. 5th ed. New York, NY: Churchill Livingstone; 2008:chap 4.Review Date:1/17/2013Reviewed By:C. Benjamin Ma, MD, Assistant Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery. Also reviewed by A.D.A.M. Health Solutions, Ebix, Inc., Editorial Team: David Zieve, MD, MHA, Bethanne Black, Stephanie Slon, and Nissi Wang.last_img read more

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