Survivors of domestic, sexual violence encouraged to share their stories

first_img + posts Taylor Boserhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/taylor-boser/ Counseling available as TCU mourns a student’s death Previous articleHoroscope: April 9, 2018Next articleRec center looks to hire lifeguards, staff for summer Taylor Boser RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR printT-shirts at Market Square inside the Brown-Lupton University Union Tuesday will provide an opportunity for survivors of domestic violence and sexual violence to tell their story.This is a part of the Clothesline Project, which helps communities show survivors that they are both believed and supported. The Clothesline Project was founded in Hyannis, Massachusetts in 1990.Students, faculty and staff can write on colored cards shaped like T-shirts, which will be displayed in Market Square and the Mary Couts Burnett Library Tuesday through Thursday.The Clothesline Project Venngage InfographicsApril is Sexual Assault Awareness Month. Campus Advocacy, Resources and Education (CARE) is having events throughout the month.The CARE office mission is to advocate and support survivors of sexual and gender-based harassment, sexual assault, stalking, dating and domestic violence while promoting education and awareness that empowers lasting change in our community.“The CARE office has not only helped me navigate my way through the Fort Worth Police Department and TCU Police Department, but CARE also helped me find many necessary resources like Campus Life and the TCU Counseling Center,” said one anonymous student.Leah Carnahan has worked at TCU for more than 15 years. She became the assistant director of Title IX Advocacy and Education in spring 2016 and the CARE office was established in the fall of 2017.“The new position and office has allowed for students to have a confidential resource for support and allowed more time and energy for awareness and education efforts in the TCU community,” Carnahan said.At TCU, one in five students has experienced, completed or attempted sexual assault in their lifetime, according to the TCU police.“After my assault, all I knew was I was scared, and I did not know how to feel safe on campus again,” said a student who asked to remain anonymous. “The CARE office helped me feel safe without forcing me to make my assault public.”Roxo, TCU’s student-run advertising and public relations agency, created the CARE office slogan: “We believe you. We C.A.R.E.”“I hope more students become aware of this resource on campus and understand its value,” Katrina Palumbo, one of Roxo’s account executives, said.Carnahan’s office is in Jarvis 124. She encourages people to email her at [email protected] or call (817)-257-5225 to make sure she is in her office, but walk-ins are welcome.“Take a friend with you if needed,” an anonymous TCU student said. “Leah will open her hands and her heart to hear you, believe you and assist you through this whole process.” Welcome TCU Class of 2025 Taylor Boserhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/taylor-boser/ Taylor Boserhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/taylor-boser/ Taylor Boserhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/taylor-boser/ CASA of Tarrant County advocates for children in foster care Linkedin ReddIt Twittercenter_img I am a senior journalism major from the great city of Chicago. Watching E! News while eating a Chipotle burrito is my favorite pastime. Go Cowboys! Facebook Linkedin Ash Wednesday marks start of Lent Facebook Twitter Majority of faculty votes yes on DEI ballot ReddIt World Oceans Day shines spotlight on marine plastic pollution TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history Taylor Boser last_img read more

Read More »

Interior Ministry protection programme for journalists also used for “close-quarters spying”

first_img ColombiaAmericas RSF, IFEX-ALC and Media Defence, support FLIP and journalist Diana Díaz against state harassment in Colombia Follow the news on Colombia News News October 21, 2020 Find out more News RSF_en 2011-2020: A study of journalist murders in Latin America confirms the importance of strengthening protection policies October 30, 2009 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Interior Ministry protection programme for journalists also used for “close-quarters spying” to go furthercenter_img ColombiaAmericas RSF begins research into mechanisms for protecting journalists in Latin America May 13, 2021 Find out more Organisation Journalist Claudia Julieta Duque, who is under an interior ministry protection programme for journalists, has told Reporters Without Borders of harassment and intimidation by the intelligence services, who obtained information about her from her alleged protectors.Duque, of Radio Nizkor, is about to present a file to the authorities exposing the persecution she has suffered since 2001 at the hands of the Department of Administrative Security Department (DAS). Some evidence is already in the hands of the office of the Public Prosecutor.Several individuals attempted to get into her home, when she was absent on 16 October, although her brother, who was in the apartment at the time, managed to deter them.The intruders left the apartment but remained in the building and can be seen on security cameras talking on mobile phones. The building’s caretaker, who was tipped off by the journalist’s brother, did not however intervene and let them out of the building without questioning them or informing anyone and they left in four cars waiting outside.The behaviour of the intruders makes it hard to imagine it was an attempted theft. The day of the incident, the journalist’s telephone was blocked between 12am and 7pm and two of the building’s 20 security cameras were not working.Added to this string of “coincidences” was a series of suspicious phone calls made to her family wanting to know where the journalist was. Duque has also said that she has been regularly followed since July. “Knowing the past history of the DAS in spying on journalists and the media, which we have several times condemned, it is hardly surprising, albeit outrageous, that the journalists’ protection programme should itself be infiltrated by the intelligence services”, the worldwide press freedom organisation said.“After the “chuzadas” (dirty war) scandal, this case is even more devastating for the presidency. Sooner or later President Alvaro Uribe will have to take responsibility for the abuses that are directly endangering the lives of journalists, when he should, on the contrary, protect them”, it added.The journalist on 23 October handed a letter to the interior ministry protection programme, in the presence of a representative from the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, calling for a directive to outlaw spying and discrimination against journalists working as columnists and commentators. She also made a series of practical demands in relation to her safety. She is now refusing to be escorted, given that these former bodyguards were those who apparently revealed information to the intelligence services between 2006 and 2007. The journalist also disclosed that before she was protected by bodyguards, the DAS had been tapping her phone calls and monitoring her emails, had filmed her while she was travelling, took photos of her daughter, all in a threatening context for the profession – condemned by Reporters Without Borders in 2004. Duque has also said that she has evidence that a charge of “insult and slander” that was pending against her for five years, pressed by the ex deputy director of the DAS, Emiro Rojas, was part of the secret services’ persecution strategy against her.Duque has however decided to keep her protection. “I have a duty to expose what has happened, but I will stay in the programme because the state has the duty to protect me”, she told Reporters Without Borders. After leaving the protection programme in April 2008, she rejoined it after the constitutional court ordered the interior ministry to guarantee her safety and the DAS to hand over illegally obtained information.Reporters Without Borders said it hoped the involvement of the UN, sought by Duque, would finally lead to a thorough and impartial investigation of the actions of the DAS. Reports Receive email alerts April 27, 2021 Find out more Help by sharing this information last_img read more

Read More »

Investors in People

first_imgInvestors in PeopleOn 20 Jun 2000 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos. He would do to it what venture capitalists do: they snap up struggling firms for a snip, plump them up, streamline, rationalise, asset strip and, oh yes, sack, before selling on for a very tidy profit a few months later. There was no shortage of voices accusing venture capitalists of being unaccountable, invisible Svengalis, a jaundiced symptom of get-rich-quick spivvery – the very nemesis of good HR practice.Venture capitalists – like their fellow deal-makers in mergers and acquisitions – are simply not seen as being very interested in people. “The financial, legal, and accountancy mafia concentrate on doing the deal – that is par for the course,” says Simon Barrow, chairman of management and recruitment consultancy People in Business. “They do have to check how good the people are they are backing, therefore they ought to be interested in first-class HR planning and the ability to work in a team and so on. “But the truth is that time pressure gets in the way of HR best practice, so I am not really sure how much they do. I don’t think they are terribly interested. You get paid for doing deals, the same as insurance.”Oddly enough, the Rover crisis came at a time when the venture capital industry is going to great lengths to emphasise its positive influence on employment. After all, venture capital is responsible for Madame Tussaud’s, IPC magazines, Tetley Tea, Sock Shop, Dunlop Slazenger, National Express, William Hill, Odeon Cinemas, United Biscuits, Goldsmiths, Umbro and Hozelock. Even the future has been mortgaged to VC: Dolly the Sheep creators PPL Therapeutics is owned by Apax Partners.Some rather tendentious statistics produced by trade body the British Venture Capital Association make the point 50 per cent of venture capital finance is for expansion – £1bn was invested in high technology companies last year. Between 1994 and 1998, venture-backed companies increased their staff levels three times faster than that of FTSE 100 companies. The average number of people employed in VC-backed companies rose by 24 per cent against a national growth rate of 1.3 per cent; sales rose by 40 per cent, profits by 24 per cent, exports by 44 per cent and investment by 34 per cent. Altogether, Britain’s venture capital fraternity (the UK accounts for 49 per cent of the total European investment) invested some £7.8bn in 1,300 companies.“Asset-stripping is really a phrase from the 1970s”, says David Thorp, chairman of the BVCA and managing director of Friends, Ivory and Syme Private Equity. “The ambitious fast-growth firms we have interests in do not really have assets to strip, apart from people, and that would be up to the company’s management, not to us.”While venture capital situations vary widely (the VC firm may have a minority stake on a management buy-out or majority control) venture capitalists are rarely involved in turnaround expeditions, he says. “Rescues happen in the middle of a recession. About one in a hundred are about turnaround at the moment.”So how detailed an interest do they take in people matters? According to Patrick Dunne, director at the largest venture capital house 3i, the composition of the board is the top priority. “The key thing for us is to get the right board in place. We spend a lot of time getting the right CEO. We do need to be convinced of the ability of the top team to be strong on the people issues. If they are not good at leading and motivating a team, that is crucial to the success of the venture.”Dunne says it is rare for HR directors to be on the main board of the companies the venture capitalists are looking at – just below board level is common. But he maintains, “The relationship between the CEO and the HR director tends to be vital. When you look at how a business is doing, if a company is not managing its team well it is not long before you see problems in the marketplace.”In assessing the pedigree of a board, Dunne says on-site visits are useful. “What you hear and see is more important than what you read.” Equally, he says VCs spend a lot of time getting different perspectives of a management team – in the case of 3i drawing on the expertise of some 600 independent directors, made up of former chief executives, chairmen and finance directors.Alasdair Warren, managing director of nCoTec, a specialist communications enabling technology venture capital firm, formed by a team of former investment bankers from Saloman Smith Barney, goes even further. He says in new economy start-ups “you are basically investing in people”.He adds, “There is a big difference in the old economy where you are realising the value of assets by efficiencies and so on. In start-ups, there is so much rapidly changing technology that you are investing in the people not the technology. It is the firms with the best people that win.”Warren agrees that it is the senior positions that venture capitalists worry about, the CEO and CFO. “Typically, ideas are generated by people with a technological background whereas it is the commercialisation of the technology that is the crucial judgement.” Because of the speed of movement, nCoTec has a strategic alliance with executive search firm, Skillcapital, which has a database of potential candidates already identified for new roles. But on the staffing side of investing in start-ups, Warren says there are definite negative consequences attached to having a firm with more than 20 people. “If it [the venture] becomes dependent on people, you have to question their ability to recruit. People can push the business plan back six months and it becomes a concern.”Aside from recruitment, at these senior levels, remuneration and incentives are the main HR area that venture capital companies have to deal with.The bulk of the financial side is straight equity or options (thanks to changes in the last two budgets), but people who move into VC-backed jobs also typically insist on a base salary premium of 25 per cent in order to take on the risk of moving. “If we put a lot of effort into finding people, we do not want them to go,” says Dunne. “The offer of options is an excellent way of aligning people to encourage growth in the value of the business. It is often logistically very difficult to put all-employee share ownership schemes in place, and that is where HR input can be crucial.”But yet, just as the venture capitalists claim to be oiling the wheels of the future economy, one of the interesting facts of the Rover crisis was that venture capital is investing in the old economy with new relish. Because of the fashionable obsession with high technology stocks, the current place to look for good deals is by trawling the chemical, engineering and retail sectors.As Guy Hands, finance principal at Nomura, is on record as saying, “Without private equity and people like Jon Moulton focusing on old economy businesses, we are going to become a country full of unemployed people sitting at home playing computer games on the Internet.”last_img read more

Read More »

Motorcyclist hospitalized after hit-and-run crash on Lincolnway East in Mishawaka

first_img (Photo supplied/ABC 57) Police are searching for a hit-and-run driver who struck a motorcyclist in Mishawaka.The crash happened shortly before 3 a.m. on Wednesday, July 15, near Mishawaka High School on Lincolnway East when a motorcycle was traveling eastbound and was rear-ended by another eastbound vehicle. That suspect vehicle then left the scene traveling eastbound.The motorcyclist, identified as a 38-year-old South Bend man, was taken to the hospital with extensive and serious injuries.Investigators believe the suspect vehicle is a 2001-2007 Chrysler Town and Country,silver or grey.The St. Joseph County Fatal Alcohol Crash Team is investigating the crash.Anybody with information about the investigation is asked to contact FACT at 574-235-9514 or Michiana Crime Stoppers at 574-288-STOP.This is a developing story. Check back for updates. Motorcyclist hospitalized after hit-and-run crash on Lincolnway East in Mishawaka Google+ IndianaLocalNews Google+ Previous articleSouth Bend police disciplinary matrix approved by Board of Public SafetyNext articleMichigan voters more than triple 2016’s absentee ballot requests for the state’s Primary Jon ZimneyJon Zimney is the News and Programming Director for News/Talk 95.3 Michiana’s News Channel and host of the Fries With That podcast. Follow him on Twitter @jzimney. By Jon Zimney – July 15, 2020 0 607 Pinterest Facebook WhatsApp Twitter Facebook Pinterest Twitter WhatsApplast_img read more

Read More »

Dougherty: Solidified quarterback spot puts Syracuse on better starting foot than last year

first_imgA year ago, as Syracuse geared up to face Penn State, it didn’t have a starting quarterback. Just two contenders — Terrel Hunt and Oklahoma transfer Drew Allen — fighting for the season’s first snap and all that would follow.Previous quarterback Ryan Nassib hardly had stains on his New York Giants jersey at training camp, yet the three-year starter felt much further away. There was no stability in a position expected to embody it.“Last year I was thinking, ‘Man, am I going to get pulled? Who’s going to start?’” Hunt, SU’s starting quarterback, said in a video on Cuse.com at the start of training camp. “So now I’m actually going in more relaxed.”To this point, Hunt’s earned that right. A year removed from fighting for his job, it’s easy to forget that Allen won it before Hunt finally and forever replaced him within a month. But what isn’t hard to notice is the stark difference between the weeks leading into Penn State and the buildup SU currently wades through.Syracuse opens the season against Villanova at 7:30 p.m. in the Carrier Dome on Friday, and there are still question marks on both sides of the ball. Its quarterback isn’t one of them, which is settling to say the least.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“It’s not like competing with Drew was bad,” Hunt said. “I learned a lot from that and it made me a better player, but going in knowing I’m going to be the starter is nice. And it’s better for the team to know who is going to lead them Week 1 — me or anyone else.”Hunt always draws a crowd at interview sessions. When you’re a starting quarterback in the Atlantic Coast Conference, it comes with the territory — but the questions have expectedly changed.It was always easy to locate Hunt, Allen and quarterbacks coach Tim Lester the week before the Orange traveled to face the Nittany Lions at MetLife Stadium. They’d each be at the center of a crowd, with everyone holding a recorder or camera in one hand and a softball in the other.Now Hunt talks about the coming season and the offense he’s set to lead, and the only competition he’s asked about is between Austin Wilson, Mitch Kimble and AJ Long. Those guys are fighting for the backup quarterback spot.“I think there’s always a sense of calm when you know that signal caller, how he is in the huddle or how he is in on the sidelines or how he is adjusting to things,” Syracuse head coach Scott Shafer said during training camp. “So I think there’s a lot of comfort with those players that are back that have played with him.”Shafer doesn’t have to learn Hunt’s snap count or play-calling cadence, but he seems just as comfortable. When addressing Villanova in the Syracuse team room at the Petty-Iacolano Football Wing on Saturday, he didn’t once mention “Hunt,” “Terrel” or “quarterback,” pertaining to his team.In all, the team’s preseason rhetoric has taken a 180-degree turn. Shafer mentioned the Wildcats’ John Robertson as a dual-threat quarterback that the Orange is heavily preparing for. As far as his depth chart, he said he wants to have a good idea of what it will look like by Tuesday — with decisions kept in-house before they’re unveiled with Friday’s kickoff.But Hunt’s penciled in and that’s not as mundane as it may seem. On the heels of a competition that consumed the first third of last season, the lack of one has this year’s Orange on a more convincing track.“Terrel established himself as a leader toward the middle and definitely at the end of last season,” offensive coordinator George McDonald said. “It’s not like a new phenomenon like, ‘Terrel’s the leader.’ He showed it, he earned, and the (offense has) continued to grow.”Jesse Dougherty is the sports editor at The Daily Orange where his column appears occasionally. He can be reached at [email protected] or on Twitter at @dougherty_jesse. Comments Published on August 25, 2014 at 2:00 am Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

Read More »