Number of LGBT+ elected officials in US hits new high

first_imgThe number of openly LGBT+ elected officials in the United States grew by more than a fifth in the past year, according to a survey published on Thursday, with a record high of some 840 gay, lesbian, bi and trans people in office across the country.The report from the LGBTQ Victory Institute comes as an historically high number of gay and trans people – more than 880 – are running for office this year, the US political advocacy group said.“When LGBTQ elected officials are in the halls of power, they change the hearts and minds of their lawmaker colleagues, defeat anti-LGBTQ bills and inspire more inclusive legislation,” said former Houston Mayor Annise Parker, the group’s president. Among the most high-profile LGBT+ candidates in recent months was Pete Buttigieg, the former mayor of South Bend, Indiana who was the first openly gay man to run for the White House. He bowed out of the race in March.In New York, two openly gay Black candidates are on track to win seats in the US Congress, a first for the nation.Democrat Mondaire Jones has declared his victory following a party primary in a New York suburb, and fellow Democrat Ritchie Torres is favored to represent the South Bronx neighborhood in Congress next year.Last year, 698 openly LGBT+ people held US elected office, according to the Victory Institute, an increase of 25% compared with June 2018. This June, the number rose to 843, it said. Despite this progress, advocates noted that gay and trans people hold 0.17% of elected positions nationwide while making up 4.5% of the US adult population.“The numbers in this report show LGBTQ political power is growing rapidly,” said Parker in emailed comments.“But it also demonstrates the daunting representation gap that we must close and is a call-to-action for all in our community to consider a run for office.”The Victory Institute found bisexual representation increased by 53% in the last year, while the number of trans women elected officials grew by 40%, although there was no increase in trans men voted into office.The report also found the number of openly LGBT+ mayors increased by 35%, while the number of state legislators increased to 160 in June from 147 in June 2019.Last year’s surge is part of a longer nationwide trend, according to the Victory Institute, with an 88% increase in openly LGBT+ elected officials since November 2017. Topics :last_img read more

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Semenya: United Nations Slams IAAF over ‘Humiliating’ Rule

first_imgThe IAAF said the motion given to the UN contained “inaccurate statements”.Under the IAAF rules, female athletes with naturally high testosterone levels would have to race against men or change events unless they took medication to reduce those levels.The regulations will apply to women in track events from 400m up to one mile and require that athletes have to keep their testosterone levels below a prescribed amount “for at least six months prior to competing”.The issue was discussed at the UN Human Rights Council’s 40th session in March, at which delegates asked for a detailed report to be put together for a future meeting.In the meantime, the body put on record its “concerns” with the IAAF proposals.The council said it wanted governing bodies “to refrain from developing and enforcing policies and practices that force, coerce or otherwise pressure women and girl athletes into undergoing unnecessary, humiliating and harmful medical procedures in order to participate in women’s events in competitive sports”.Writing in the British Medical Journal, experts recently claimed the IAAF’s regulations risked “setting an unscientific precedent for other cases of genetic advantage”Speaking in June, two-time Olympic champion and three-time world champion Semenya called the rule “unfair”, adding: “I just want to run naturally, the way I was born.”The IAAF intended to bring in new rules on 1 November 2018 but the subsequent legal challenge prompted that to be delayed until the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) had ruled on the matter.That ruling was due on 26 March but Cas has postponed it until next month.A win for Semenya would see her free to continue competing the way she has always done, but a loss means the South African athlete could end up not competing altogether, competing against men or having to take medicine to lower her hormone levels.Semenya has previously been asked to undertake gender testing by athletics chiefs, but no results have officially been made public.Testosterone is a hormone that increases muscle mass, strength and haemoglobin, which affects endurance.In a statement provided to BBC Sport, the IAAF said “It is clear that the author is not across the details of the IAAF regulations nor the facts presented recently at the Court of Arbitration for Sport.“There are many generic and inaccurate statements contained in the motion presented to the UN Human Rights Council so it is difficult to work out where to start.“The common ground is that we both believe it is important to preserve fair competition in female sport so women are free to compete in national and international sport.“To do this it is necessary to ensure the female category in sport is a protected category, which requires rules and regulations to protect it, otherwise we risk losing the next generation of female athletes, since they will see no path to success in female sport.”Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegram United Nations Human Right Council has condemned the plans by IAAF to classify female athletes by their testosterone levels which they claimed “contravene international human rights”.Olympic 800m champion Caster Semenya, 28, is challenging the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) over its bid to restrict levels of testosterone in female runners.The UN called the plans “unnecessary, humiliating and harmful”.last_img read more

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