Five-year sentence for syringe attack

first_imgLimerick Artist ‘Willzee’ releases new Music Video – “A Dream of Peace”  A 29-year-old man has been sentenced to five years imprisonment for threatening to stab a shop worker with a syringe.Damien O’Brien, with addresses at Singland Park, Garryowen and St Munchin’s Street, St Mary’s Park, was found guilty of assaulting a staff member at Gleeson’s Spar on Henry Street, and of threatening Seaghan Gleeson with a syringe outside Gleeson’s Spar on Catherine Street.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Both offences occurred on the evening of October 10 2013.When the jury of eight men and four women returned unanimous guilty verdicts on both charges, Mr O’Brien, who had denied the charges, shouted: “I am an innocent man”.While he was being led from court by Gardaí, he continued to protest, saying there was “no justice system” and that “they can’t keep me locked up forever”.Earlier in the three-day trial, prosecution counsel John O’Sullivan told the court that Mr O’Brien arrived into the Catherine Street shop shortly after 5pm on the evening in question, just minutes after the incident in the Henry Street branch.Mr O’Sullivan stated that the accused was observed by staff putting an item of confectionary into his jacket pocket, Mr Gleeson and another staff member then followed him outside and confronted him.He added that Mr O’Brien then became aggressive, “produced a syringe and said ‘I’ll kill you, I’ll stab you’”. Vanishing Ireland podcast documenting interviews with people over 70’s, looking for volunteers to share their stories Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival Linkedin Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live WhatsApp Twitter RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebookcenter_img Print WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads Email NewsFive-year sentence for syringe attackBy John Keogh – February 5, 2015 1030 Previous articleNew hope for distressed homeownersNext articleCounting the costs of calories will effect restaurants – RAI John Keoghhttp://www.limerickpost.ie TAGSlimericklimerick circuit court Advertisement Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed livelast_img read more

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Pesticide treatment key for crops

first_imgPests such as thrips, whiteflies, aphids, beet armyworm and hornworms can devastate vegetable crops.Potentially just as harmful, though, is the misuse of pesticides, which can lead to pest resurgence, resistance and risk the environment.Applying the proper amount of each chemical is key to sustaining vegetable productivity in Georgia, according to University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences entomologist David Riley.“Everybody is concerned about insecticide use but for different reasons,” said Riley, a researcher on the Tifton campus. “On the growers’ side, they’re looking at the price of the product. It’s expensive. They want to maximize the use of their product and get the most efficient use out of it.” On the other hand, the insecticide companies don’t want farmers to overuse their products because they are concerned that insects will become resistant. When that happens they’ll have to go back to the drawing board and spend money engineering new chemicals. These concerns led to Riley’s research into insecticide resistance in pests like whiteflies.Insecticides are an expensive tool that farmers are forced to use. Riley estimated insecticide applications cost $27 million a year — close to three percent of the value of Georgia’s vegetable production value in 2009. However, the chemical treatments applied protect one-third of the vegetable crop’s value, amounting to $302 million in state vegetable revenue.Riley studies insecticide use as part of the UGA Vegetable Entomology Project. The goal is to help farmers reap the maximum benefit from investment into pesticides. In collaboration with various chemical companies, the project’s researchers conduct pest control studies annually. The experiments test the efficiency of pesticides on cabbage, collard, cantaloupe, cucumber, tomato, pepper, onions, squash and watermelon.He is working to find a middle ground that appeases the concerns of chemical companies and farmers.“We’re just basically trying to find a happy medium where you alleviate a lot of your environmental concerns, you alleviate a lot of your concerns about, ‘Am I affecting my bees (and) pollinators? Am I keeping my productivity to a level I can live with?’” Riley said.There is no simple answer to this dilemma, Riley said. Using as much pesticide as a farmer can afford is bound to diminish the chemical’s effectiveness, put pollinators in danger and diminish the farmer’s future yields. Abandoning all pesticide use, though, may slash farmers’ productivity to below a break-even point. “I think what we’re looking at is that hard place in the middle where you try to figure out, ‘How do I use the things I need to use, the minimum use to get the maximum benefit?’” Riley said. As part of the vegetable entomology project, an effort is under way to find corrective measures in controlling cowpea curculio in southern peas. No products currently exist that can control the pest’s devastating impact which led to the collapse of pea production a couple of years ago.last_img read more

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Education Department launches investigation into USC’s handling of complaints against George Tyndall

first_imgDaily Trojan file photoThe U.S. Department of Education announced Monday that it launched a second Title IX investigation into USC’s handling of sexual harassment reports, focusing specifically on allegations against former Engemann Student Health Center gynecologist George Tyndall.The investigation, led by the department’s Office for Civil Rights, will assess Tyndall’s career at USC, as well as how the University allowed him to continue treating patients despite numerous sexual misconduct complaints dating back to the 1990s.“We welcome the U.S. Department of Education’s investigation and the university will fully cooperate with their inquiry,” Board of Trustees Chair Rick Caruso said in a statement emailed to the Daily Trojan. The OCR previously conducted an investigation into USC’s handling of sexual assault and harassment cases between August 2010 and May 2015 after 16 students and alumni claimed the University Title IX office had mishandled their cases. The investigation concluded in early 2018, with the OCR commending USC for proactively complying with federal policies by the end of the investigation. The OCR requested documents and information from the University while reviewing all reports against the staff and faculty made from 2010 to 2013. However, USC made no mention of Tyndall’s alleged misconduct during the investigation, even after the University found that Tyndall’s behavior was “outside the scope” of appropriate medical standards and the University’s harassment policy, causing Tyndall to resign in June 2017.As a result, the new investigation will also look into why the University failed to mention Tyndall during the prior investigation.“No student should ever endure sexual harassment or abuse while trying to pursue their education,” U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos said in a statement from the Department of Education. “Every student on every campus should have a safe learning environment, and I expect all education institutions under the Department’s jurisdiction to take seriously their responsibilities under Title IX. Attempts to obfuscate or hide Title IX violations from the Department will not be tolerated.”USC is also under a separate “monitoring agreement” with the OCR to address compliance concerns and violations associated with the University’s handling of sexual misconduct cases from 2010 to 2015.Tyndall has denied all allegations made against him. In addition, USC President C. L. Max Nikias and other senior administrators have contended that they had no knowledge of Tyndall’s alleged misconduct until shortly before his removal in 2017.The Los Angeles Police Department is also currently investigating complaints against Tyndall.This story will be updated.last_img read more

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