O Superwoman

first_img“We often used the river as a way of editing the record,” Anderson said. “We would record some things and then listen back while we stared at the river, and it became a way to see if the music was … working. Whatever it was doing, whether the river was choppy, or smooth, or murky, or covered with brightly lit whitecaps, there was something about watching the motion of the water that taught us things about how to use the right combination of planned and spontaneous, just really, how to flow.”At one point, the performance artist, who was married to the musician Lou Reed from 2008 until his death in 2013, offered listeners a vivid description of her late husband’s reaction to a moving piece of music. “When he heard music that really got to him, first he would laugh. And he had this laugh of a completely insane person. It started out as a kind of a howl, and it had lots and lots of notes in it as it went up and up and just kind of ended in this big, deep complicated chord. It was really his own piece of, sort of experimental music. Then next he would roll up his sleeve, point to his arm, and he would say, ‘See, that’s what I am talking about,’ and his arm was completely covered with goosebumps.”Anderson admitted her response to touching works of art looks slightly different.“My own reactions to hearing music or seeing dance or theater that I really love is the almost irresistible urge that I have to leave as soon as possible. To run out of the theater, the concert hall, out into the street. I can’t stop myself. I just run out, almost as if I need to check how the world looks in this new light of what I just saw, or what I just heard.”In a Q&A session with flutist Claire Chase, a professor of the practice of music, Anderson said that in the age of social distancing her goal is to create an online work that is “as live as it could be.” But even though she is versed in technology, Anderson is always mindful of the potential virtual glitch.“The big crash is the one that’s always on my mind.”The next lecture in the series, “The Forest,” will be on March 24 at 5 p.m. In a classic case of imposter syndrome, Laurie Anderson began the first of her six Norton Lectures wondering, like many Harvard students, whether her invitation from Harvard had been an administrative blunder.“I am pretty sure that the Norton committee at Harvard made an enormous mistake when they asked me to do this lecture series, and it was really my own sense of the absurd that made me want to say yes,” said the award-winning artist, musician, filmmaker, and the recipient of this year’s Charles Eliot Norton Professorship in Poetry.But there was no mistake. Suzannah Clark, director of the Mahindra Humanities Center, opened the virtual event pointing out that in a pandemic that has upended normal life, she could think of “no greater creative artist who could have responded to this historic occasion with as much imagination and innovation as Laurie Anderson.”The artist and Chicago native, known for her boundary-breaking multimedia shows, didn’t disappoint, offering a performance instead of a traditional talk and guiding her online audience through a dreamscape of shifting images, music, and musings on life during the pandemic, the death of John Lennon, Tai Chi, art that makes her want to flee — in a good way — the absolute nature of time, and the existential heft of the children’s book “The Wind in the Willows.”An avant-garde artist, Anderson is considered a pioneer in electronic music and a groundbreaker in the use of technology. Her 1981 surprise hit “O Superman” was inspired by a “failure of technology,” Anderson told the British newspaper The Guardian in 2016. The song, she said, is “based around a looped ‘ha ha ha ha’ done on a harmonizer, but I wanted it to be like a Greek chorus — not just one voice — so I used a vocoder, which was originally developed as spy technology to disguise voices. It fitted the concept.”,On Wednesday afternoon, Anderson’s command of technology was on full view. She used virtual backgrounds to materialize on the Sanders Theatre stage, drift down a snowy road, and float above the island of Manhattan; she played a violin she designed with a bow strung with magnetic tape instead of horsehair; and she put a small speaker in her mouth to manipulate a track of music. Through the clever use of filters the artist also took on different personas during her hourlong presentation, inhabiting Austrian neurologist and father of psychoanalysis Sigmund Freud; 1980s blonde bombshell Loni Anderson, for whom she was once mistaken; and her longtime friend and collaborator, the father of ambient music Brian Eno.Anderson said she was inspired by minimalist composers as a young artist living in New York City. Their work lived “outside of beats and bars” and seemed to ignore time completely, she said, and that resonated with her. “I didn’t want boundaries on the music. I wanted to have the feeling that I was slipping into a river of sound and that it would continue when I stepped out of it.”The overarching theme of her talks, titled “Spending the War Without You: Virtual Backgrounds,” was a nod to the kind of battle the nation has been waging both with the coronavirus, she said, and with heated political rhetoric. “People are shivering outside at night in these makeshift restaurants, and a war that’s been going on for four years, or maybe many, many more, has been raging really, as words,” said Anderson.“It’s in this context of war, loss, counting, backtracking … and suffering, of boredom and solitude, that I will try to tell you what I know about music and life,” she continued.Anderson made it clear she owes some of her life lessons to Eno and some to the Hudson River. Her first talk, simply titled “The River,” was in part an ode to the famous waterway and the impact it’s had on her creative process. She described working on her 1994 album “Bright Red” with Eno in her New York City studio with windows that looked onto the Hudson. “My own reactions to hearing music or seeing dance or theater that I really love is the almost irresistible urge that I have to leave as soon as possible.” — Laurie Andersonlast_img read more

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Smithtown Crash Leaves Driver Dead

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A 61-year-old Central Islip man was killed in a car crash in Smithtown on Monday morning.Suffolk County police said James Poallo was driving a Hyundai Sonata westbound on West Jericho Turnpike and tried to make a left turn into a parking lot when his vehicle was struck by an eastbound Ford F350 pickup truck at 8 a.m.The victim was taken to Stony Brook University Hospital, where he was pronounced dead.The pickup truck driver was not injured, but his passenger was hospitalized for treatment of minor injuries.Fourth Squad detectives are continuing the investigation and ask anyone with information on this case to call them at 631-854-8452.last_img

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Anamarija Cicarelli: The time has come when only the best will survive, those who are interactive, flexible, enterprising and who want to invest in quality

first_imgAlthough we see high quality apartments in the media, social networks and in general everywhere, unfortunately this is not the case with most private accommodation, Cicarelli points out. “Most of the private accommodation is still in non-renovated buildings, it is equipped with dilapidated furniture, it does not offer any additional services, almost nothing is invested in marketing. According to a survey we conducted last year, 30% of facilities in private accommodation do not have a website, they invest only one percent in advertising, up to HRK 1000 per year, and it refers to most Croatian portals. On the other hand, as a small number of renters know what the operating costs are, this is determined “deductively”. Depreciation of the object is not calculated by anyone. Annual investment per apartment hardly exceeds 5.000 kn. At a time of increasing tourists in the world in general, especially the arrival of new tourists belonging to generations Y and Z, the awakening of new markets and new niches within existing markets, it is unrealistic to expect that this type of apartment will be sold. Cicarelli points out. In the end, Cicarelli points out that in order to be a successful landlord, both this year and in all these years to come, it is necessary to completely change the way we do business. ”Currently on the market there are no problems with renters who have quality facilities whose quality justifies the price. But investing in the quality of the facility alone is not enough, it does not guarantee occupancy. It is necessary to increase the quality of communication with guests, marketing, advertising… In short, quality in each segment, above all. Unfortunately, all those who do not do business in this way already feel the consequences, and in the future it will be much more pronounced. The time has come when only the best will survive, those who are interactive, flexible, enterprising and who want to invest in quality. This is nothing new, all this is a natural and expected business cycle that we have been warning about for a long time and preparing them through workshops and trainings.”Concludes Cicarelli. We have to fight for quality, not lower prices According to Cicarelli, there are several reasons for this. Since the increase in the number of beds in private accommodation, the revived markets that have attracted or returned their guests, we still have a large number of accommodation that does not follow market demand trends, although more and more younger populations are taking over advertising. they know all the possibilities of internet advertising, many rely on only 1-2 sales channels, etc.… “We can say that the scenario we expected started to happen slowly. The situation is still far from alarming, but it is certainly such that we must prepare for the future, especially in the context of private accommodation”Says Cicarelli and adds that it is sensationalist and wrong to interpret the decline in the occupancy of private accommodation as the end of tourism in Croatia, but the beginning of the end of the way of doing business that we know is certainly there.center_img Gostiju koji dolaze samo na kupanje i sunčanje na našoj obali sve je manje, oni kojima je to jedini motiv dolaska traže sve niže cijene. S druge strane kako naglašava Cicarelli, pojavila se i jedna nova vrsta domaćina – oni koji su prisiljeni iznajmljivati “bilo što” kako bi nadopunili izuzetno niski životni standard. I jedni i drugi bore se na tržištu isključivo spuštanjem cijena, a to nikada ne može završiti dobro. Posljedice takve politike poslovanja ove godine svi osjećamo. What is happening with private accommodation in 2019 – is an issue that is constantly highlighted in the media and social networks these days. One of the answers has one of the greatest experts in the development of private accommodation, Anamarija Cicarelli from the Interligo Family Accommodation Counseling Center, author of five professional books for private accommodation owners, editor of a specialized magazine and a longtime educator for private renters, who points out that in the last few years there has been talk of ending the rapid development of tourism.last_img read more

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Trojans to open 2012 season at home

first_imgSomething about the crack of a well-struck ball off a wooden bat, the smack of a ball landing perfectly in the pocket of a glove, the smell of pine tar or freshly mown grass makes baseball uniquely cherished in the hearts of its fansIt does not have the intensity of football, the tempo of basketball, the fluidity of hockey or the raw emotion of soccer. But it has an innate simplicity, a purity and timelessness that fans treasure deeply.Taking the mound · Senior pitcher Brandon Garcia is one of several experienced players that coach Frank Cruz will depend on during the season. Garcia batted .309 in 2011 and started five games at pitcher. – Carlo Acenas | Daily TrojanBaseball returns to USC’s Dedeaux Field on Friday as the Trojans host Jacksonville University on opening night for both teams, and just the thought of that makes USC coach Frank Cruz’s eyes light up.“[Opening day] reminds you of the pastime. It is the pastime,” Cruz said. “All the players are announced, they’re all out there for the anthem. And everybody’s excited. It’s a new start. It’s a fresh start. And it’s just a real special feeling.”It will be a special feeling for the Trojans’ starting pitcher. Redshirt senior Andrew Triggs spurned a professional contract for the second year in a row and is back for his third consecutive year as the Trojans’ Friday night ace.“I’m really excited to be back,” Triggs said. “I hope it’s a real special season.”Triggs led the team in innings pitched last season with 90 2/3, amassing a 5-4 record and a 3.67 ERA. Most impressive, however, were his 72 strikeouts to just 28 walks on the season.“We’re ecstatic to have Andrew back,” Cruz says. “Any time you can return a Friday night starter, that’s huge.”Triggs is not the only returning player whom Cruz feels lucky to have back. Both senior catcher Kevin Roundtree and senior outfielder Alex Sherrod had a significant possibility of being drafted. But neither of them were, and now they’re back for their final season with the Trojans.In Roundtree, USC returns a three-year starter and steady presence behind the plate who hit leadoff and finished with a .308 batting average and .404 slugging percentage last season.Cruz said Roundtree has moved himself from a leadoff hitter to the middle-of-the-order hitter.Easily the most pure and experienced hitter of these 2012 Trojans, Sherrod slugged .486 last season to lead the team, beating out All-American and third-round draft pick first baseman Ricky Oropesa.As for USC’s opponent this weekend, this team is tougher than the Dolphin mascot might suggest. Jacksonville returns 20 players from a team that competed in the NCAA Regionals last season. Their first baseman, Adam Walker II, is one of the top prospects in next year’s draft.“They’re supposedly called a ‘mid-major,’” said Cruz. “But they’re gonna be good. I don’t care what anybody says, this is a legitimate team.”Though the Trojans lack a star draft prospect, they will try to make up for that in experience. Six of the positional starters will be upperclassmen, including five seniors.And one of the underclassmen, sophomore shortstop James Roberts, is plenty experienced, having started every game at that position last year as a true freshman.USC plans on starting two true freshmen this year: Dante Flores at second base and Stephen Tarpley, who was drafted in the eighth round last year but chose instead to come to USC, as a  left-handed starting pitcher.Saturday’s game is scheduled for 2 p.m. with senior righty Ben Mount on the hill for the Trojans. Tarpley will take the mound for the series finale Sunday at 1 p.m.last_img read more

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Clippers-Lakers game Monday comes with motivation aplenty

first_imgHe said he’ll always have fond feelings for his former teammates, who have lost seven of their past 10 games after falling again last-place Phoenix on Saturday.“They are my guys, they will always be my friends and it’s tough to see them lose,” Zubac said. “But them losing is good for us, so that’s how it works.”MBAH A MOUTE’S STATUS Clippers hope they can play to their capabilities, quell Mavericks’ momentum For Lakers’ LeBron James, Jacob Blake’s shooting is bigger issue than a big Game 4 victory Kristaps Porzingis ruled out as Clippers, Mavericks set for Game 5; Follow for game updates Clippers vs. Mavericks Game 5 playoff updates from NBA beat reporters “We’ve been going at it every practice when I was there,” said Zubac, who is averaging 8.6 points, 7.7 rebounds and shooting 44.8 percent from the field and 70.8 percent from the foul line. “I know how to play against them, I know how to make them work and I’ll be just happy to play the Lakers for the first time in my career.“I’ve been watching almost every game,” Zubac continued. “I feel like every time I watch them, I’m like, ‘If I was there, I would help them. I would definitely make a difference on the floor,’ you know? But they’re not my team anymore.”Related Articlescenter_img LOS ANGELES — Former Laker Ivica Zubac expects full well that his former teammates will be motivated when they meet his new team Monday — it’s crunchtime in the playoff race and the seventh-place Clippers lead the 10th-place Lakers in the Western Conference standings.After being part of the first trade between the franchises since 1983, when the teams exchanged packages that brought Norm Nixon to the (then-San Diego) Clippers and sent Byron Scott to the Lakers, Zubac said he’ll be ready to go, too.“I can’t wait; I’m motivated,” the 21-year-old starting center said. “They’re a dangerous team, they’re fighting for playoffs and this is a big game, one of the biggest games of the season for them, so we gotta come out ready, focused. We gotta play smart, we gotta know what we want to do, take away their things and we’ll be good.”Zubac said he’ll use what he learned in practices against his former team, whose games he’s regularly tuned in to watch since the trade, which sent Mike Muscala (who was acquired two days earlier from Philadelphia as part of the deal for Tobias Harris) to the Lakers for Zubac and Michael Beasley, who was waived. What the Clippers are saying the day after Luka Doncic’s game-winner tied series, 2-2 Coach Doc Rivers said it was news to him that Luc Mbah a Moute’s status on the team’s injury report was upgraded Saturday from a definite “out” to less-definite “questionable.” But he called the development “fantastic.”Mbah a Moute has missed 61 consecutive games — including Sunday’s victory over the Knicks — with what’s been categorized as a “sore knee.”Rivers said he welcomes his return, when and if it comes, though he’ll temper his expectations.“Obviously, even when he can play, he can’t play a lot, he’s not played all year,” Rivers said. “So my guess is he’ll have a very low-minute thing. But you can always put him in to guard someone, Luc can do that anytime. And we need him down the stretch, so it would be great to get him back.“He’s been in zero practices,” Rivers added, noting that Mbah a Moute has worked with assistant coaches recently. “He proved that he can stop (assistant) Sam (Cassell). And Sam thinks that’s a good sign. Sam thinks he can still score right now in the NBA.” Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

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