How coffee is helping boost property values

first_imgREIQ Gold Coast zone chairman Andrew Henderson. Picture: Jerad WilliamsONE of the rules of buying property is to follow the infrastructure trail. In other words, you should buy properties close to where new infrastructure is being built. Infrastructure projects are proven to be a key factor driving up the value of houses. The Collective, Palm Beach. Photo by Richard GoslingWhat many people don’t realise is that venues like bars and restaurants can also add value to nearby properties, although generally not those homes located right next door. An English study found the opening of Michelin star restaurants in a suburb could lead to property prices rises of up to two per cent in one year. This is not surprising to me. Cafes, restaurants and hotels add to the lifestyle appeal of an area. Property owners and renters want to live close to the action. So, I would jokingly suggest you ask a friendly restaurateur to open a new venue near your home.-ANDREW HENDERSON An aerial general view of the Gold Coast skyline.The best documented impact on property prices relate to transport projects. For example, a Lloyds Bank study found that closeness to tram stops created premium property prices throughout England. Proximity to train and tram stops have long been identified as creating a price premium in Melbourne. Research into the Gold Coast property market has found that land within 400m of the stations increased in value by seven per cent more than the surrounding land, in the year after the light rail began operation here.More from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa18 hours ago02:37Gold Coast property: Sovereign Islands mega mansion hits market with $16m price tag2 days agoBut it’s not just transport links that property buyers should be looking at. Social infrastructure, which includes schools, hospitals and community facilities; can also boost property values. For example, on the Gold Coast, closeness to The Southport School can add a significant premium on prices.Local attractions can also have a significant impact on prices.The most obvious one on the Gold Coast is the beach. The closer your property is to the beach, the more it is worth. last_img read more

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Dougherty: Solidified quarterback spot puts Syracuse on better starting foot than last year

first_imgA year ago, as Syracuse geared up to face Penn State, it didn’t have a starting quarterback. Just two contenders — Terrel Hunt and Oklahoma transfer Drew Allen — fighting for the season’s first snap and all that would follow.Previous quarterback Ryan Nassib hardly had stains on his New York Giants jersey at training camp, yet the three-year starter felt much further away. There was no stability in a position expected to embody it.“Last year I was thinking, ‘Man, am I going to get pulled? Who’s going to start?’” Hunt, SU’s starting quarterback, said in a video on Cuse.com at the start of training camp. “So now I’m actually going in more relaxed.”To this point, Hunt’s earned that right. A year removed from fighting for his job, it’s easy to forget that Allen won it before Hunt finally and forever replaced him within a month. But what isn’t hard to notice is the stark difference between the weeks leading into Penn State and the buildup SU currently wades through.Syracuse opens the season against Villanova at 7:30 p.m. in the Carrier Dome on Friday, and there are still question marks on both sides of the ball. Its quarterback isn’t one of them, which is settling to say the least.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“It’s not like competing with Drew was bad,” Hunt said. “I learned a lot from that and it made me a better player, but going in knowing I’m going to be the starter is nice. And it’s better for the team to know who is going to lead them Week 1 — me or anyone else.”Hunt always draws a crowd at interview sessions. When you’re a starting quarterback in the Atlantic Coast Conference, it comes with the territory — but the questions have expectedly changed.It was always easy to locate Hunt, Allen and quarterbacks coach Tim Lester the week before the Orange traveled to face the Nittany Lions at MetLife Stadium. They’d each be at the center of a crowd, with everyone holding a recorder or camera in one hand and a softball in the other.Now Hunt talks about the coming season and the offense he’s set to lead, and the only competition he’s asked about is between Austin Wilson, Mitch Kimble and AJ Long. Those guys are fighting for the backup quarterback spot.“I think there’s always a sense of calm when you know that signal caller, how he is in the huddle or how he is in on the sidelines or how he is adjusting to things,” Syracuse head coach Scott Shafer said during training camp. “So I think there’s a lot of comfort with those players that are back that have played with him.”Shafer doesn’t have to learn Hunt’s snap count or play-calling cadence, but he seems just as comfortable. When addressing Villanova in the Syracuse team room at the Petty-Iacolano Football Wing on Saturday, he didn’t once mention “Hunt,” “Terrel” or “quarterback,” pertaining to his team.In all, the team’s preseason rhetoric has taken a 180-degree turn. Shafer mentioned the Wildcats’ John Robertson as a dual-threat quarterback that the Orange is heavily preparing for. As far as his depth chart, he said he wants to have a good idea of what it will look like by Tuesday — with decisions kept in-house before they’re unveiled with Friday’s kickoff.But Hunt’s penciled in and that’s not as mundane as it may seem. On the heels of a competition that consumed the first third of last season, the lack of one has this year’s Orange on a more convincing track.“Terrel established himself as a leader toward the middle and definitely at the end of last season,” offensive coordinator George McDonald said. “It’s not like a new phenomenon like, ‘Terrel’s the leader.’ He showed it, he earned, and the (offense has) continued to grow.”Jesse Dougherty is the sports editor at The Daily Orange where his column appears occasionally. He can be reached at [email protected] or on Twitter at @dougherty_jesse. Comments Published on August 25, 2014 at 2:00 am Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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Volleyball secures a win but still has room to improve

first_imgUSC seemed like two different teams at times, looking strong in the first and third set but falling off dramatically in the second. The Trojans hit .000 in the second set, their worst single-set hitting percentage all season. The third set was tightly contested. The score was tied 10 times, and there were six lead changes in the third set alone, while no other set had more than one lead change. USC was aided by an Arizona service error and two service aces by senior libero Jenna Adams in the final 5 points of the match. Starting out the match strong and faltering somewhere in the middle is quickly becoming a trend for this year’s team. Last week versus UCLA, the Trojans won the first set 25-12 but dropped the second and third, only to lose in the fifth. Crouch said his team did not leave everything on the court against Arizona.  “In the fourth, it was going the same way as it was in the second,” Crouch said. “I really challenged the team in a way that I haven’t challenged them yet this year during a timeout at 6-2, and they responded.” That timeout sparked an 8-1 run for the Trojans, putting them in position to take the fourth set. “We had lots of swings to get kills, and they were like 60% swings, we weren’t taking rips,” Crouch said. “We won the first set, and we took the foot off the gas. You have to have the pedal to the metal or you aren’t going to win.” Senior outside hitter Emily Baptista is still out with a knee injury. Baptista has only played in 10 sets for the Trojans so far this season. (Sinead Chang / Daily Trojan)  “I think [the timeout] was necessary and needed,” senior middle blocker Jasmine Gross said. “We know we are a great team, but there are times where we need a little bit of a push, and I think [Crouch] did a great job pushing us right when we needed it.”   USC still awaits the return of senior opposite hitter Emily Baptista, who had 369 kills in 33 games last season, the third highest total for USC. The Trojans will face No. 8 Washington 8 p.m. Friday at Galen Center as Pac-12 play continues. USC’s season began with lofty expectations. The Trojans will have to turn things around fast if they still want to compete at a top-5 level. Gross was also a key contributor, recording eight kills and a team-high five blocking assists. Gross said Arizona’s fast-paced offense allowed her to have more blocking success than she had against a slower UCLA offense. The Trojans recorded a total of 10 blocks on the game. “It’s time to go on a run,” Crouch said. “We can’t be this up-and-down team that we’ve been where we play some sets and look like a Final Four team, then we play a set and look like [we are] No. 200 in the country.” Although USC hit a modest .213 in the match, freshman outside hitter Emilia Weske came up big for the Trojans with eight kills and a .438 hitting percentage. The freshman from Potsdam, Germany, continues to solidify her role as an outside hitter for this team.  “We come out pretty strong then other teams start coming back harder, and we aren’t ready for it,” Gross said. “We just have to keep pushing urgency for every single set.” No. 25 USC women’s volleyball defeated Arizona 3-1 Saturday evening at Galen Center in its second conference match this season. The Trojans bounced back after Wednesday’s emotional five-set loss to rival UCLA to bring their conference record to 1-1.  After this early deficit, second-year head coach Brent Crouch called a timeout to regroup. The Trojans looked sluggish as they began the fourth set. Arizona jumped out to a 6-2 lead after three consecutive errors by USC.last_img read more

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