Interior Ministry protection programme for journalists also used for “close-quarters spying”

first_img ColombiaAmericas RSF, IFEX-ALC and Media Defence, support FLIP and journalist Diana Díaz against state harassment in Colombia Follow the news on Colombia News News October 21, 2020 Find out more News RSF_en 2011-2020: A study of journalist murders in Latin America confirms the importance of strengthening protection policies October 30, 2009 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Interior Ministry protection programme for journalists also used for “close-quarters spying” to go furthercenter_img ColombiaAmericas RSF begins research into mechanisms for protecting journalists in Latin America May 13, 2021 Find out more Organisation Journalist Claudia Julieta Duque, who is under an interior ministry protection programme for journalists, has told Reporters Without Borders of harassment and intimidation by the intelligence services, who obtained information about her from her alleged protectors.Duque, of Radio Nizkor, is about to present a file to the authorities exposing the persecution she has suffered since 2001 at the hands of the Department of Administrative Security Department (DAS). Some evidence is already in the hands of the office of the Public Prosecutor.Several individuals attempted to get into her home, when she was absent on 16 October, although her brother, who was in the apartment at the time, managed to deter them.The intruders left the apartment but remained in the building and can be seen on security cameras talking on mobile phones. The building’s caretaker, who was tipped off by the journalist’s brother, did not however intervene and let them out of the building without questioning them or informing anyone and they left in four cars waiting outside.The behaviour of the intruders makes it hard to imagine it was an attempted theft. The day of the incident, the journalist’s telephone was blocked between 12am and 7pm and two of the building’s 20 security cameras were not working.Added to this string of “coincidences” was a series of suspicious phone calls made to her family wanting to know where the journalist was. Duque has also said that she has been regularly followed since July. “Knowing the past history of the DAS in spying on journalists and the media, which we have several times condemned, it is hardly surprising, albeit outrageous, that the journalists’ protection programme should itself be infiltrated by the intelligence services”, the worldwide press freedom organisation said.“After the “chuzadas” (dirty war) scandal, this case is even more devastating for the presidency. Sooner or later President Alvaro Uribe will have to take responsibility for the abuses that are directly endangering the lives of journalists, when he should, on the contrary, protect them”, it added.The journalist on 23 October handed a letter to the interior ministry protection programme, in the presence of a representative from the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, calling for a directive to outlaw spying and discrimination against journalists working as columnists and commentators. She also made a series of practical demands in relation to her safety. She is now refusing to be escorted, given that these former bodyguards were those who apparently revealed information to the intelligence services between 2006 and 2007. The journalist also disclosed that before she was protected by bodyguards, the DAS had been tapping her phone calls and monitoring her emails, had filmed her while she was travelling, took photos of her daughter, all in a threatening context for the profession – condemned by Reporters Without Borders in 2004. Duque has also said that she has evidence that a charge of “insult and slander” that was pending against her for five years, pressed by the ex deputy director of the DAS, Emiro Rojas, was part of the secret services’ persecution strategy against her.Duque has however decided to keep her protection. “I have a duty to expose what has happened, but I will stay in the programme because the state has the duty to protect me”, she told Reporters Without Borders. After leaving the protection programme in April 2008, she rejoined it after the constitutional court ordered the interior ministry to guarantee her safety and the DAS to hand over illegally obtained information.Reporters Without Borders said it hoped the involvement of the UN, sought by Duque, would finally lead to a thorough and impartial investigation of the actions of the DAS. Reports Receive email alerts April 27, 2021 Find out more Help by sharing this information last_img read more

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115th Congress: Fall Legislative Agenda

first_img About Author: Joey Pizzolato The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Tagged with: 115 Congress in Daily Dose, Featured, Government, Headlines, News Previous: Best Practices for Servicing FHA Loans Next: Freddie Mac Perspectives Blog: G-Fees and CRT Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Home / Daily Dose / 115th Congress: Fall Legislative Agenda Subscribe Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Share Save Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily  Print This Postcenter_img September 5, 2017 1,423 Views Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago 115th Congress: Fall Legislative Agenda 115 Congress 2017-09-05 Joey Pizzolato Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago The 115th Congress reconvened on Tuesday after the summer recess, and will have to hit the ground running if they are going to accomplish all items on the agenda, according to the National Association of Federally-Insured Credit Unions.The end of September brings a number of deadlines: first, funding for the fiscal year, which begins in October, needs to be approved. With that, the debt ceiling will need to be raised in order to allow the Treasury Department to borrow money for Hurricane Harvey relief. Although it is not yet drafted, Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin said in a recent interview that he would like to see legislation for hurricane relief funds be tied to an increase in the debt ceiling. The Nation Flood Insurance Program will also need to be reauthorized before September’s close.There has been talk of the Senate invoking the Congressional Review Act to remove the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s arbitration clause, which allows consumers to file class action lawsuits, although no action has been taken.Various committees will also gather for hearings that could have implications for the mortgage and finance industries. The House Financial Services Subcommittee on Capital Markets, Securities, and Investments will meet to discuss the oversight of the financial industry’s regulatory authority, and the House Financial Services Subcommittee on Financial Institutions and Consumer credit will review proposals for “a more efficient federal financial regulatory regime.”Confirmations hearings will also be taking place: the Senate Banking Committee will vote on Joseph Otting, President Trump’s nominee to be Comptroller of the Currency, and Randal Quarles, the president’s nominee as Federal Reserve governor. Pam Patenaude, who was nominated to be the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Deputy Secretary in June, is still waiting on a vote. Joey Pizzolato is the Online Editor of DS News and MReport. He is a graduate of Spalding University, where he holds a holds an MFA in Writing as well as DePaul University, where he received a B.A. in English. His fiction and nonfiction have been published in a variety of print and online journals and magazines. To contact Pizzolato, email [email protected] Related Articles Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days agolast_img read more

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Commentary: Trump Takes Charge By Letting Go

first_imgMAY 3, 2018  By John KrullTheStatehouseFile.com INDIANAPOLIS – President Donald Trump did something smart, something good – something right – with North Korea.He stepped back. Now, the long-troubled Korean peninsula and people have a chance for peace. The odds that they will get peace still are long, but the chances look a lot better than they did a few weeks ago.If they do achieve peace, it also will mean greater peace for a troubled world.This is a good thing.North Korea is the most militarized part of the world. Its leader, Kim Jong-un, is both unstable and amoral, a dangerous combination. He’s killed members of his own family and threatened the United States and other countries with North Korea’s expanding nuclear arsenal.For a time, it seemed that President Trump was determined to match or perhaps top Kim’s pugnacity and irrationality. The two leaders traded threats, keeping the world balanced on a knife edge between anxiety and terror in the process.As Trump and Kim taunted each other, the world often seemed at the edge of war, held hostage by two men with impulse-control issues and vast numbers of nuclear weapons at their disposal.It was in that space that South Korean President Moon Jae-in saw an opportunity.The Seoul Olympic Games gave South Korea a chance to extend an olive branch to their neighbors and onetime fellow countrymen.South Korea invited North Korea not just to participate in the games, but to have the two countries that once were one form teams together.The thaw began, and it continues now.President Trump’s supporters argue that he should be honored for this development. Quite a few of them – including U.S. Rep. Luke Messer, R-Indiana, whose Senate primary campaign is chasing Trump voters with the ardor of a hungry dog chasing a thrown bone – even have urged that the president be nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize.Trump may not merit a Nobel, but he does deserve credit, just not for the reason his most devoted followers think.His inflammatory saber-rattling and adolescent boasting don’t merit lauding.But his willingness to cede the central position in the discussions regarding North Korea does.Too many U.S. presidents have fallen victim to the fantasy that U.S. power equals U.S. omnipotence. Too often, they have acted as if we could remake the world as we wished, wiping away centuries of history and uprooting millions of lives along the way.But America’s power, great as it is, is not limitless.We, like every other nation and every other person on the planet, are bound by reality.And the reality is that any lasting peace on the Korean peninsula would have to be created and implemented by the peoples of North Korea and South Korea. Any “peace” foisted on the two nations by outsiders would have been an ongoing source of resentment and fuel for future conflagrations.The only way to peace is the way now being pursued – that of allowing the Korean people to talk and work through their differences. If they can put an end to nearly 70 years of warfare, distrust and tension, their lives will be better,and every human being will be able to sleep more soundly.This is as it should be.Too many leaders – not just in the United States, but everywhere – think it is their duty to solve every problem. They forget, at times, that the important thing is the solution, not the person who arrives at it.Sometimes, the best – the wisest – thing a leader can do is get out of the way.Part of the reason there is a shot at peace along the Korean peninsula is that President Trump did just that.Donald Trump sees himself – and his followers see him – as a take-charge guy, one who commands attention.It goes against his nature to let go, to surrender the stage to someone else.That’s what he did here.That’s why things are better.He deserves credit for that.FOOTNOTE: John Krull is director of Franklin College’s Pulliam School of Journalism, host of “No Limits” WFYI 90.1 Indianapolis and publisher of TheStatehouseFile.com, a news website powered by Franklin College journalism students.This article was posted by the City County Observer  without opinion, bias or editing. without opinion, bias or editing.Print Friendly, PDF & EmailFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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