Survivors of domestic, sexual violence encouraged to share their stories

first_img + posts Taylor Boserhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/taylor-boser/ Counseling available as TCU mourns a student’s death Previous articleHoroscope: April 9, 2018Next articleRec center looks to hire lifeguards, staff for summer Taylor Boser RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR printT-shirts at Market Square inside the Brown-Lupton University Union Tuesday will provide an opportunity for survivors of domestic violence and sexual violence to tell their story.This is a part of the Clothesline Project, which helps communities show survivors that they are both believed and supported. The Clothesline Project was founded in Hyannis, Massachusetts in 1990.Students, faculty and staff can write on colored cards shaped like T-shirts, which will be displayed in Market Square and the Mary Couts Burnett Library Tuesday through Thursday.The Clothesline Project Venngage InfographicsApril is Sexual Assault Awareness Month. Campus Advocacy, Resources and Education (CARE) is having events throughout the month.The CARE office mission is to advocate and support survivors of sexual and gender-based harassment, sexual assault, stalking, dating and domestic violence while promoting education and awareness that empowers lasting change in our community.“The CARE office has not only helped me navigate my way through the Fort Worth Police Department and TCU Police Department, but CARE also helped me find many necessary resources like Campus Life and the TCU Counseling Center,” said one anonymous student.Leah Carnahan has worked at TCU for more than 15 years. She became the assistant director of Title IX Advocacy and Education in spring 2016 and the CARE office was established in the fall of 2017.“The new position and office has allowed for students to have a confidential resource for support and allowed more time and energy for awareness and education efforts in the TCU community,” Carnahan said.At TCU, one in five students has experienced, completed or attempted sexual assault in their lifetime, according to the TCU police.“After my assault, all I knew was I was scared, and I did not know how to feel safe on campus again,” said a student who asked to remain anonymous. “The CARE office helped me feel safe without forcing me to make my assault public.”Roxo, TCU’s student-run advertising and public relations agency, created the CARE office slogan: “We believe you. We C.A.R.E.”“I hope more students become aware of this resource on campus and understand its value,” Katrina Palumbo, one of Roxo’s account executives, said.Carnahan’s office is in Jarvis 124. She encourages people to email her at [email protected] or call (817)-257-5225 to make sure she is in her office, but walk-ins are welcome.“Take a friend with you if needed,” an anonymous TCU student said. “Leah will open her hands and her heart to hear you, believe you and assist you through this whole process.” Welcome TCU Class of 2025 Taylor Boserhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/taylor-boser/ Taylor Boserhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/taylor-boser/ Taylor Boserhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/taylor-boser/ CASA of Tarrant County advocates for children in foster care Linkedin ReddIt Twittercenter_img I am a senior journalism major from the great city of Chicago. Watching E! News while eating a Chipotle burrito is my favorite pastime. Go Cowboys! Facebook Linkedin Ash Wednesday marks start of Lent Facebook Twitter Majority of faculty votes yes on DEI ballot ReddIt World Oceans Day shines spotlight on marine plastic pollution TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history Taylor Boser last_img read more

Read More »

Another journalist’s body found

first_imgNews Follow the news on Mexico Organisation May 5, 2021 Find out more MexicoAmericas Reporter Pablo Ruelas Barraza was found shot to death in Huatabampo (Sonora state, northwest Mexico) on 13 June, apparently executed by two gunmen who tried first to kidnap him. Ruelas, 38, worked for regional dailies Diario del Yaqui in Huatabampo and El Regional de Sonora in Hermosillo. The past month has been grim for the country’s journalists. Local media said Ruelas Barraza, a general reporter, had received death threats. Reporters Without Borders called on investigators to consider that he might have been killed because of his work and warned that focusing on his previous brushes with the law must not be allowed to interfere with this. The organisation said the killing again raised the issue of when the federal government was going to apply the new agreement on protecting journalists signed last November. News May 13, 2021 Find out more MexicoAmericas 2011-2020: A study of journalist murders in Latin America confirms the importance of strengthening protection policies Receive email alerts News RSF_en Help by sharing this information to go further A total of 74 journalists have been murdered in Mexico since 2000 and 13 others have disappeared. The government’s war against drug-traffickers has cost about 40,000 lives since December 2006.Cartoon : Hernández_____________________________________10.06.11 – Acapulco daily’s news editor missing for past three daysMarco Antonio López Ortiz, the news editor of Novedades Acapulco, a daily based in the resort city of Acapulco (in the southwestern state of Guerrero), has been missing since 11:30 p.m. on 7 June, when he was kidnapped by several individuals as he went to meet a woman friend in a bar, according to reports yesterday on the websites of his newspaper and El Sur, another local paper. Colleagues from Novedades Acapulco found his car outside the bar.The staff of the two newspapers did not want to provide Reporters Without Borders with any additional information about the case. The Guerrero State Commission for Human Rights (CEDH) said no complaint had been filed with the commission by López’s family by yesterday evening.“Like CEDH president Juan Alarcón Hernández, we voice our solidarity with López’s family and colleagues and we hope he will be found safe and sound soon, even if the outcome of the most recent disappearance of a journalist in Mexico makes us fear the worse. There have been many murders and disappearance in this region and two journalists were murdered in Guerrero last year without any progress in the investigation until now.”Violence against journalists, human rights activists and civil society representatives continues unabated as a “peace caravan” that set off from the southern city of Cuernavaca six days ago continues to head for the US border, where it is due to arrive tomorrow. Led by Javier Sicilia, a poet whose son was murdered in March, it is intended to remind the federal authorities of the terrible toll from their offensive against drug trafficking – 40,000 dead since December 2006.“Organized crime has to be combated but the authorities, who are themselves often its accomplices, cannot continue this insane offensive that has plunged the country into a state of war and sacrificed so many innocent lives,” Reporters Without Borders added. “The international community is not doing enough to denounce this collapse of the rule of law. What remains of civil liberties as armed terror continues to reign?”Reporters Without Borders will continue as long as necessary to relay the important “No more blood – No + sangre” campaign by leading Mexican cartoonists. A total of 73 journalists have been killed in Mexico since 2000, and 13 (including López) have gone missing since 2003. April 28, 2021 Find out more June 14, 2011 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Another journalist’s body found Reporter murdered in northwestern Mexico’s Sonora state NSO Group hasn’t kept its promises on human rights, RSF and other NGOs say Reportslast_img read more

Read More »