Concerns about vaping health effects rise as hospitalizations increase

first_imgFacebook World Oceans Day shines spotlight on marine plastic pollution Benton McDonald is a senior journalism and political science double major from Austin, Texas. He has worked for TCU360 since his freshman year and is currently the executive editor. Board approves tuition freeze, RRI actions but doesn’t act on eligibility issue spurred by Williams Thousands of TCU community members receive COVID-19 vaccines as university supply increases printJUUL is the most popular brand of e-cigarette on the market (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)UPDATE: A previous version of this article said that the TCU Pharmacy would provide Chantix to students looking for help with their nicotine addiction. The Pharmacy will only provide the prescription if students present a valid prescription from their physician. No matter where you are on campus, someone around you likely has an e-cigarette. While TCU’s campus is smoke-free, many students get their nicotine fix every day without lighting it up. The use of devices like the JUUL, an e-cigarette the size of a flash drive that emits small clouds of odorless smoke, has skyrocketed over the last decade, with sales increasing by 641 percent from 2016 and 2017, according to the CDC. But what began as a social activity in places like the high school bathroom has now become an addictive and harmful habit for many. One TCU student, who wished to remain anonymous for this story, experienced sharp stomach pains each morning before he hit his JUUL and has since quit. The student said he was smoking “a pod or more” of e-cigarette vapor each day. The nicotine content in one JUUL pod is equivalent to that of a pack of cigarettes, according to JUUL. Many students don’t realize the addictive and harmful effects of e-cigarettes when they first start using them, according to Brad Stewart, the associate director of the TCU Wellness Center.  “They think, ‘Well I just use it socially, like on the weekends partying, I’ll have my JUUL,’ but a lot of times what they don’t realize is that they can become severely addicted to nicotine even from casual usage just once or twice a week,” he said. “And then they start to realize that they’re having more cravings and more cravings.”The rise of e-cigarette usage is not unique to TCU. More than 3 million high school students reported vaping in 2018, according to a study released by the CDC. Among that group, 27.7 percent reported vaping more than 20 days a month. E-cigarette use has increased since the CDC first began tracking the data in 2011. Image courtesy: CDC “Over the last 4 years we’ve seen epidemic levels of increases in JUUL specifically and e-cigarette use in youth,” Stewart said. While the student whom TCU 360 spoke to quit before his health issues worsened, the same is not true for a growing number of people nationwide. A recent rise in vaping-related cases, which has jumped from 94 to 215 in recent weeks, according to CDC press releases, is leaving doctors and health experts without many answers. “Nobody has any idea why all the sudden there’s so much of it going on,” said Dr. Karen Schultz, the medical director of pulmonology at Cook Children’s Health Care System. “It’s baffled everybody.”A Fort Worth-area teen was hospitalized for 18 days at Cook Children’s this past summer, 10 of which were spent in a medically-induced coma with a breathing tube down his throat. While his doctors can’t say with certainty, they believe the failure of his lungs was caused in part by his vaping habit. While this case was the first they had seen at Cook Children’s, Schultz said she has seen an increase in the number of emergency room patients who reported chest pain and shortness of breath due to vaping in the past few months. “Those kids are getting hooked on that stuff, and it’s going to be as hard to come off vaping e-cigarettes as it is coming off of regular cigarettes,” she said. “It’s the same dependency of your body.”The number of e-cigarette users has continued to rise despite a clear knowledge about what products like JUUL contain and how harmful they are to one’s body. “We don’t know what the real dangers are,” she said of e-cigarettes. “It has been around, I think, 10 or 12 years now. It took decades for us to realize the dangers of smoking.” To prevent students from experiencing these life-threatening symptoms, TCU is looking to provide resources for anyone who find themselves with the unwanted habit. The TCU pharmacy will provide Chantix to students who receive a prescription from their doctor and Stewart said they are open to starting group cessation classes in the future.  “We want students to start to realize the damage that they’re causing to their lungs and esophagus,” he said. Another resource the university will lean on is the new smoking age that went into effect Sept. 1, when Texas joined 17 other states in raising the legal age to buy and use tobacco products to 21. Both Stewart and Schultz supported the change but saw it as the first of many steps toward lowering the number of young smokers. “If you’re still choosing to do that, you made that choice for yourself, but we’re not going to create an environment on campus or in the state or in the community that makes that easy for that damage and negative impact to happen to everyone around you,” Stewart said.  Benton McDonald Twitter Settlement reached between TCU, former professor in discrimination lawsuit Benton McDonaldhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/benton-mcdonald/ Linkedin Previous articleHoroscope: September 9, 2019Next articleCity proposes price increase for golf yearly passes Benton McDonald RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Twitter Chancellor talks stimulus money, COVID-19 vaccines and more at limited attendance faculty town hall TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history Benton McDonaldhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/benton-mcdonald/ Benton McDonaldhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/benton-mcdonald/ + posts Facebook Linkedin Benton McDonaldhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/benton-mcdonald/ Welcome TCU Class of 2025 JUUL is the most popular brand of e-cigarette on the market (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File) ReddIt ReddItlast_img read more

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Carrie St. Louis on What She’ll Miss as She Exits Broadway’s Wicked

first_img Related Shows In the corporate world, employees leaving a job are often asked to sit through an exit interview with HR about their time at the company. That concept doesn’t exist for Broadway performers, but we love checking in with stars as they finish up a successful run. Carrie St. Louis has had a glittery run as Glinda in the Broadway blockbuster Wicked. She is leaving (possibly via bubble) on October 30, which also happens to be the show’s 13th Broadway-versary, a.k.a. Wicked Day. In her Broadway.com Exit Interview, St. Louis shares what she’ll miss as she makes her exit from the Gershwin Theatre.How did you feel when you first got this job?I was elated! Glinda has been a dream role of mine ever since I saw the national tour when I was 15. It really was a total dream come true in every way. How do you feel now that you’re leaving?It’s bittersweet. Of course, I am sad to leave my Glinda girl behind, but I am so grateful for the opportunity and the experience. I learned so much about myself throughout this process, and I get to keep all of those lessons moving forward. I will cherish these past two years for the rest of my life. What are three words you would use to describe your experience?Exhilarating. Rewarding. So incredibly special What was the easiest thing about this job?Wearing Susan Hilferty’s Tony Award-winning costumes! I wish I could take them all home. Also, becoming a part of the wonderful Wicked family! I have met lifelong friends through this show and it is always a highlight to see them every day and laugh NONSTOP backstage/have pre-show dance parties. What was the hardest thing?The emotional and physical stamina that the role requires. Not only is the role written for a wide vocal range, Glinda is also a roller coaster of emotions from the beginning to the end of the show. She works in extremes and that can be very exhausting eight times a week. The range of emotional depth mixed with energetic comedic moments over the course of a three-hour show is challenging. What was the highlight of your time at this job?My first night on Broadway with my best friends and family in the audience, including both of my grandmothers! There is no better feeling than being surrounded and supported by people you love. What skills do you think are required for future job applicants?A lot of energy (or coffee), a solid vocal range and a strong sense of self. Glinda is a complex character, and I think it’s important (especially in a long-running show) to stay truthful to yourself and the story and not just be a carbon copy of someone else, which is an easy trap to fall into. What advice would you give to future employees in your job position?If you ever feel overwhelmed or stuck or tired—always go back to telling the story. It is one of the greatest, and when told truthfully; it will never steer you wrong.How do you think you’ve grown?Oh, exponentially! I’m a completely different actor and human from where I started two years ago. I’ve realized I’m capable of way more than I ever thought I was. And being able to tell a story about compassion, friendship and acceptance in times like these is truly powerful.  Why are you leaving?Just like with any chapter in life, it’s time. But I’m leaving with a suitcase full of memories, a new perspective and a much stronger sense of self. I’ve learned so much over these past two years and look forward to many more adventures to come!What will you miss the most? Meeting so many inspiring and wonderful people at the stage door! Wicked has the best fans on the Earth, and it has been such a highlight meeting so many grandparents, young children, musical theater nerds like me, tourists from all over the world and more at the stage door, and seeing how the story/message has affected them. It is the most fulfilling job in the world to be able to transport someone for a few hours and make them laugh, cry, smile and get away from it all. Like the exit door of the Gershwin says, “You are now leaving Oz.” And what a special, special place it’s been. This is cheesy but, “Happy is what happens when all your dreams come true.” from $95.00 Carrie St. Louis(Photos: Emilio Madrid-Kuser & Joan Marcus)center_img Wicked View Commentslast_img read more

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‘Shabu peddler’ falls in buy-bust

first_imgSultan was caught after he sold a sachetof suspected shabu to an undercover officer for P1,000, it added, ILOILO City – Police arrested asuspected drug peddler in a buy-bust operation in Barangay Banica, Roxas City. Resident Raniel Josha Sultan was caughtaround 1:45 a.m. on Dec. 6, a police report showed. When frisked, he yielded 10 more sachetsof suspected illegal drugs valued at around P25,000, police said. The suspect was detained in the lockupcell of the Roxas City police station, facing charges for violation of RepublicAct 9165, or the Comprehensive Dangerous Drugs Act of 2002./PNlast_img

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Guildford man charged with bribery and drug related crimes

first_imgGreendale, IN—Theodore J. Green, 25, of Guilford, was charged in Dearborn Superior Court II on Wednesday on allegations of one Count of Bribery, Obstruction of Justice, Possession of a Controlled Substance, and Possession of Paraphernalia  after he was observed giving $950 in cash to a Dearborn County Detective in an attempt to make a previously charged case “go away.”​On October 31, 2019, Green contacted Dearborn County Det. Carl Pieczonka via text message and offered Det. Pieczonka $3000 to make a case filed by another Dearborn County Sheriff’s Deputy go away. On November 4, 2019, Det. Pieczonka arranged a meeting with Green in Greendale, with other officers from the Dearborn County Special Crimes Unit observing the meeting.​At this meeting, Green gave $950 in cash to Det. Pieczonka, and was arrested by Deputies Adam Ziegler and Garret Rollins shortly thereafter. When arrested, he was also found to be in possession of a glass smoking pipe and had green plantlike material in his teeth. When questioned, Green informed officers that he had eaten a section of a Ziploc bag containing synthetic marijuana, or “spice”.​If convicted, Theodore Green faces a sentence of between 1 year and 6 years in the Indiana Department of Corrections on the Bribery Charge.​Prosecutor Lynn Deddens thanked Detective Pieczonka, Dep. Rollins, and Dep. Ziegler for their work investigating this case. “My office takes any attempt to skirt the law through bribery seriously, and we will always prosecute those who attempt to bribe officers or other public officials,” Deddens stated.last_img read more

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Ambassador Marks to rep Jamaica in Dubai at 6th annual world…

first_imgJamaica’s Ambassador to the United States Her Excellency Audrey Marks will represent the Jamaican Government at the sixth annual gathering of World Government Summit which is being held in Dubai February 11–13.  The summit which is being held under the theme “Shaping Future Governments” will explore the future of governments in the coming decade led by the phenomenal advances of mankind. The World Government Summit is a global platform dedicated to the enhancement of governments around the world and will bring together over 3000 participants, world leaders, policymakers, international organizations and experts from over 130 countries.  Jamaica is represented at the summit for the first time by Ambassador Marks who was invited by the Government of the United Arab Emirates.While at the summit Ambassador Marks will have the opportunity to share her thoughts with world leaders who will be working to bring prosperity to their nations.  Previous speakers at this premier event include former President to the United States, Barak Obama, General Secretary to the United Nations, His Excellency Antonio Guterres, President of the World Bank Jim Yong Kim, Managing Director of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) Christine Lagarde and Chairman of the World Economic Forum Elon Musk.last_img read more

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