High Court to hear Perry’s challenge to FG Sligo/Leitrim Convention result

first_img Pinterest By admin – December 15, 2015 Previous articleDerry PSNI warn of crackdown on bad parkingNext articleLatest man to be detained in Peggy O’Hara funeral probe is released admin Twitter Facebook RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Guidelines for reopening of hospitality sector published LUH system challenged by however, work to reduce risk to patients ongoing – Dr Hamilton The High Court is due to begin hearing an application today for an injunction to stop Fine Gael from ratifying its election candidates for Sligo/Leitrim. The constituency also includes part of South Donegal.It’s part of a legal action brought by Deputy John Perry who believes there were serious and substantial irregularities in the selection convention, and argue that the outcome of the October convention was  fundamentally flawed .The Fine Gael TD lost out on a place on the ticket for next year’s election, but he believes there were a number of irregularities that spoiled the final vote, including the alleged recording of votes for absent members and the non-recording of votes from members who were there.The High Court has set aside three days this week to hear his application for an injunction restraining the party from ratifying the successful candidates, pending the outcome of a full action to try and force Fine Gael to hold another convention.A number of witnesses, including voting and election experts, are due to called. Facebook Google+ Google+center_img WhatsApp WhatsApp High Court to hear Perry’s challenge to FG Sligo/Leitrim Convention result Twitter Three factors driving Donegal housing market – Robinson Nine Til Noon Show – Listen back to Wednesday’s Programme GAA decision not sitting well with Donegal – Mick McGrath Pinterest Homepage BannerNews Calls for maternity restrictions to be lifted at LUH last_img read more

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Pike County United Way Kickoff showcases agencies

first_img Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration Email the author Print Article Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits “The United Way Kickoff is a great way for us the let people know what we do and also to people know how important the United Way is to our agency and to all the others that depend on it,” Ellis said.The agencies represented at the Pike County United Way Kickoff were the Pike Regional Child Advocacy Center, Big Brothers Big Sisters, Humane Society of Pike County, Sav-a-Life, American Red Cross Pike County Branch, Girl Scouts, Boy Scouts, Colley Senior Complex, House of Ruth, Salvation Army, East Central Mental Health, 4-H Clubs of Pike County, RSVP, Troy Charity League, Easter Seals, Pioneer Museum of Alabama and OCAP.Tonya Gibson, Pike County United Way executive director, expressed appreciation to all of the agencies that participated and to all of those who came out in support of the United Way. “As we kick off the annual Pike County United Way campaign, we always like to give the community an opportunity to see where the money goes that is donated to the United Way,” Gibson said.“All of the money raised here in Pike County stays in Pike County to help our friends and neighbors, with the exception of the Boy Scouts.The money donated to the Boy Scouts comes back to the community through the local Boy Scout camp near Enterprise.”The fundraising campaign got off to a fast start Tuesday night and will end at Thanksgiving. Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson The Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies… Published 11:07 pm Tuesday, August 17, 2010 “The more money we raise, the more support we can give to these agencies that are so vital to our community,” Gibson said.The silent auction always brings great excitement to the Kickoff event, as neighbors become friendly foes in an effort win the bids.“We really want to thank all of those who donated items for the auction,” Gibson said.“And to those who bid and bid again.”Faye Lunsford was keeping a watchful eye on the items she hoped to take home.“Auctions are always fun and this was a really good one,” she said. “I have to keep watching to see who’s going to try to outbid me.” Latest Stories Book Nook to reopen You Might Like United Way working to improve lives The Pike County United Way campaign kicked off on Tuesday evening, and over the course of the next several weeks… read more By Jaine Treadwell Skip The Pike County community had an opportunity Tuesday night to learn more about the agencies that work so diligently to make the county a better place to live, work and play.The Pike County United Way Kickoff at Cattleman Park featured the 17 agencies that it supports financially each year and each agency was on hand to let people know exactly what it does in support of Pike County and its people.Anita Ellis, East Central Mental Health, said her agency appreciates the opportunity to bring awareness to the many programs and services it offers to the community. By The Penny Hoarder Sponsored Content Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Pike County United Way Kickoff showcases agencies Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthMost 10 Rarest Skins for FortniteTCGThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

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O Superwoman

first_img“We often used the river as a way of editing the record,” Anderson said. “We would record some things and then listen back while we stared at the river, and it became a way to see if the music was … working. Whatever it was doing, whether the river was choppy, or smooth, or murky, or covered with brightly lit whitecaps, there was something about watching the motion of the water that taught us things about how to use the right combination of planned and spontaneous, just really, how to flow.”At one point, the performance artist, who was married to the musician Lou Reed from 2008 until his death in 2013, offered listeners a vivid description of her late husband’s reaction to a moving piece of music. “When he heard music that really got to him, first he would laugh. And he had this laugh of a completely insane person. It started out as a kind of a howl, and it had lots and lots of notes in it as it went up and up and just kind of ended in this big, deep complicated chord. It was really his own piece of, sort of experimental music. Then next he would roll up his sleeve, point to his arm, and he would say, ‘See, that’s what I am talking about,’ and his arm was completely covered with goosebumps.”Anderson admitted her response to touching works of art looks slightly different.“My own reactions to hearing music or seeing dance or theater that I really love is the almost irresistible urge that I have to leave as soon as possible. To run out of the theater, the concert hall, out into the street. I can’t stop myself. I just run out, almost as if I need to check how the world looks in this new light of what I just saw, or what I just heard.”In a Q&A session with flutist Claire Chase, a professor of the practice of music, Anderson said that in the age of social distancing her goal is to create an online work that is “as live as it could be.” But even though she is versed in technology, Anderson is always mindful of the potential virtual glitch.“The big crash is the one that’s always on my mind.”The next lecture in the series, “The Forest,” will be on March 24 at 5 p.m. In a classic case of imposter syndrome, Laurie Anderson began the first of her six Norton Lectures wondering, like many Harvard students, whether her invitation from Harvard had been an administrative blunder.“I am pretty sure that the Norton committee at Harvard made an enormous mistake when they asked me to do this lecture series, and it was really my own sense of the absurd that made me want to say yes,” said the award-winning artist, musician, filmmaker, and the recipient of this year’s Charles Eliot Norton Professorship in Poetry.But there was no mistake. Suzannah Clark, director of the Mahindra Humanities Center, opened the virtual event pointing out that in a pandemic that has upended normal life, she could think of “no greater creative artist who could have responded to this historic occasion with as much imagination and innovation as Laurie Anderson.”The artist and Chicago native, known for her boundary-breaking multimedia shows, didn’t disappoint, offering a performance instead of a traditional talk and guiding her online audience through a dreamscape of shifting images, music, and musings on life during the pandemic, the death of John Lennon, Tai Chi, art that makes her want to flee — in a good way — the absolute nature of time, and the existential heft of the children’s book “The Wind in the Willows.”An avant-garde artist, Anderson is considered a pioneer in electronic music and a groundbreaker in the use of technology. Her 1981 surprise hit “O Superman” was inspired by a “failure of technology,” Anderson told the British newspaper The Guardian in 2016. The song, she said, is “based around a looped ‘ha ha ha ha’ done on a harmonizer, but I wanted it to be like a Greek chorus — not just one voice — so I used a vocoder, which was originally developed as spy technology to disguise voices. It fitted the concept.”,On Wednesday afternoon, Anderson’s command of technology was on full view. She used virtual backgrounds to materialize on the Sanders Theatre stage, drift down a snowy road, and float above the island of Manhattan; she played a violin she designed with a bow strung with magnetic tape instead of horsehair; and she put a small speaker in her mouth to manipulate a track of music. Through the clever use of filters the artist also took on different personas during her hourlong presentation, inhabiting Austrian neurologist and father of psychoanalysis Sigmund Freud; 1980s blonde bombshell Loni Anderson, for whom she was once mistaken; and her longtime friend and collaborator, the father of ambient music Brian Eno.Anderson said she was inspired by minimalist composers as a young artist living in New York City. Their work lived “outside of beats and bars” and seemed to ignore time completely, she said, and that resonated with her. “I didn’t want boundaries on the music. I wanted to have the feeling that I was slipping into a river of sound and that it would continue when I stepped out of it.”The overarching theme of her talks, titled “Spending the War Without You: Virtual Backgrounds,” was a nod to the kind of battle the nation has been waging both with the coronavirus, she said, and with heated political rhetoric. “People are shivering outside at night in these makeshift restaurants, and a war that’s been going on for four years, or maybe many, many more, has been raging really, as words,” said Anderson.“It’s in this context of war, loss, counting, backtracking … and suffering, of boredom and solitude, that I will try to tell you what I know about music and life,” she continued.Anderson made it clear she owes some of her life lessons to Eno and some to the Hudson River. Her first talk, simply titled “The River,” was in part an ode to the famous waterway and the impact it’s had on her creative process. She described working on her 1994 album “Bright Red” with Eno in her New York City studio with windows that looked onto the Hudson. “My own reactions to hearing music or seeing dance or theater that I really love is the almost irresistible urge that I have to leave as soon as possible.” — Laurie Andersonlast_img read more

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Cattaraugus County Reports Seventh COVID-19 Related Death

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) WNY News Now / MGN Stock Image.LITTLE VALLEY — Cattaraugus County health officials report the county’s seventh death related to COVID-19 and six new positive tests.The 75-year-old man had developed respiratory failure and was unable to overcome his illness despite aggressive medical treatment, officials said.In addition, the Cattaraugus County Health Department was notified of six additional confirmed cases of COVID-19 residents within Cattaraugus County. The department’s active positive COVID-19 caseload is 21, with 209 residents who have recovered, officials said.One of the newly confirmed cases is a female who lives in the southeast portion of the county. She has no significant travel history and denies any contact with a positive COVID-19 person. She developed fever, cough, headaches, muscle aches and pneumonia and was tested for COVID-19 on September 28. Her test results on Thursday indicated as positive. Officials also said another confirmed confirmed case is a male who also lives in the southeast region of the county. Officials said he has no significant travel history and denies any contact with a positive COVID-19 person. He developed shortness of breath, diarrhea, fatigue and muscle aches. He was given a rapid test for COVID-19 on Thursday and his test results indicated that he was positive for the virus.A male healthcare worker who lives in the southeast part of the county, and reports no significant travel history, also tested positive officials said. The man indicated he had been in direct contact with a positive COVID-19 person. He also reports being asymptomatic (no fever, no cough, no muscle aches, etc.). He was given a rapid test for COVID-19 on Thursday and tested positive.Another man, who lives in the county’s southeast quadrant and has no significant travel history and denies any contact with a positive COVID-19 person was  given a rapid test for COVID-19 on Thursday as part of a screening process and his test results indicated that he was positive for the virus.A woman resident of the southwest part of the county, who has no significant travel history and denies any contact with a positive COVID-19 person, developed fever, cough, sore throat, and muscle aches and was given a rapid test for COVID-19 on Thursday and tested positive.A man from the southwest area of the county, who has no significant travel history and denies any contact with a positive COVID-19 person, developed headaches and muscle aches and was given a rapid test for COVID-19 on Thursday and tested positive.The health department has begun a thorough contact tracing investigation for those individuals that they have been in contact with and the places that they have visited.Officials urge any resident experiencing fever, cough, shortness of breath or whole body aches they should contact their health care provider (avoid going directly to an Urgent Care facility, or the Emergency Room before calling).In an effort to determine the prevalence of the virus in our community, any resident interested in getting a swab test can register for a test or call 716-938-9119 or 716-938-2265.last_img read more

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Financial literacy is more important than ever for couples

first_imgCombining assets is a societal norm as old as the tradition of marriage itself. But many couples are finding trouble in paradise before they ever reach their honeymoon.Couples are not only deciding to share space before marriage, but according to a new Credit Karma survey, they are also combining finances.Credit Karma reported half of millennial couples are consolidating finances, yet more than a third rely on credit cards. Now may be an ideal time for credit unions to prove their financial expertise to this young and in love demographic.How  unions can facilitate stabilityWhile it’s widely known that financial issues are the most common cause for divorce, the “why?” is still being debated. Conflicts over financial secrets, spending habits and not understanding each other’s “money memories” all contribute to the poor decisions newlyweds often make around their finances, writes LearnVest. continue reading » 17SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Unlucky Kwadwo Asamoah suffers fresh injury

first_imgVersatile midfielder Kwadwo Asamoah has been hit by yet another injury barely a month after making a return from the sidelines.The former Udinese man regained full fitness three weeks ago after a long injury layoff but he is believed to have picked a fresh injury in theBianconeri’s Coppa Italia win over Inter on Wednesday where he lasted the entire duration of the game.Asamoah complained of a problem in his right thigh after the game and it is feared he could have suffered a thigh muscle injury.He is expected to undergo a scan to determine the extent of the injury.The Ghana international, who has been capped 66 times by the Black Stars, was ruled out of the 2015 AFCON in Equatorial Guinea due to a knee injury which took him out for action for nearly one year. Asamoah is yet to feature under Ghana coach Avram Grant and this fresh injury could hamper any chances of his first appearance under the Israeli as Ghana prepare to host Mozambique in a 2017 AFCON qualifier in March.–Follow Joy Sports on Twitter: @JoyFMSports. Our hashtag is #JoySportslast_img read more

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