‘Pusher’ busted in Cadiz

first_imgBACOLOD City – Seven sachets ofsuspected shabu valued at around P12,500 were seized in a buy-bust operation inBarangay Tinampaan, Cadiz City, Negros Occidental. The 31-year-old Jay-R Delina ofBarangay Zone 4, Cadiz City yielded the suspected illegal drugs, a policereport showed.  Delina was nabbed after he soldsuspected shabu to an undercover cop for P500 around 4 p.m. on Sunday, thereport added. The police also impounded his multicab.  center_img The suspect wasdetained in the custodial facility of the Cadiz City police station, facingcharges for violation of Republic Act 9165, or the Comprehensive DangerousDrugs Act of 2002./PNlast_img

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Martinez respects Carroll qualities

first_imgRoberto Martinez’s Wigan side come up against a rejuvenated Andy Carroll on Saturday and the Latics manager believes there will always be a place in the game for an old-fashioned English number nine. The West Ham striker, on loan from Liverpool, has scored six goals in his last 11 appearances and proved more than a handful for champions-elect Manchester United in midweek. Martinez insists players have to use whatever strengths they have to their own advantage and will be preparing his defenders for more of the same. “He is a potent threat and he’s always been a threat,” said the Latics manager. “We have seen him at two previous clubs show the same power and strength and he did it for England at the Euros and was very impressive so I don’t think it is a surprise to anyone.” Defeat at Manchester City in midweek ended a five-match unbeaten run for Wigan, leaving them three points from safety, albeit with a match in hand. The Latics were arguably the better team at the Etihad and Martinez said that gave the FA Cup finalists confidence as they approached the crucial run-in of their last six league matches. “It was a very positive performance. Yes, at this stage of the season we need the points and to get the results but if you look at the dressing room it is full of confidence,” he stressed. “When I see us visiting the champions and, in the game, demanding three points that fills me with pride because it shows how far we’ve come. “We are prepared to go until the last ball is kicked on May 19 (when they face fellow strugglers Aston Villa at home).” center_img Press Associationlast_img read more

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No. 9 could be savior for injured LBs

first_imgAfter a sports summer dominated by “‘The Decision”‘ and some more age-old indecision by a certain age-old quarterback, I’ll take the liberty of assuming you’re thinking the same thing I am at this point — it’s good to be back.As Madison continues to return to form, Bret Bielema’s squad has been doing the same since Aug. 9, the opening of fall camp. With everyone and their mother hopping on the Badger bandwagon this summer — even the big boys at ESPN — expectations are as high as they have been since 2008.Yet, if you remember that campaign, you’ll recall those sky-high expectations resulted in a 7-6, 3-5 Big Ten season that was undoubtedly a disappointment. This year, however, the vibe is different, and the Badgers have the potential to best not only those lackluster results of two years ago, but also the entire conference.If, that is, the defense stays healthy.In as team-oriented a sport as football, designating one factor as the “key” to the success of a team may be a bit extreme. Yet, if these Badgers are to avoid another major letdown, maintaining the health of the defense is of utmost importance.Already this fall camp, sophomore linebacker Mike Taylor, junior linebacker Kevin Claxton and senior linebacker Culmer St. Jean have missed time with injuries. Notice a trend? Linebackers will surely be at a premium this season. Not to mention, senior strong safety Jay Valai, one of the unquestioned leaders of the defense, missed several practices with a concussion, and possible starting defensive tackle Jordan Kohout was out for a significant period of time with a bone bruise on his knee.Yes, injuries to linebackers are nothing new, and fall camp is just fall camp. However, the August injury report does reveal an honest assessment of the depth of this year’s roster.“If we were playing tomorrow, I’d be really, really worried,” defensive coordinator Dave Doeren said after practice last week.Particularly in regard to his linebackers, Doeren was concerned.“It’s decimated right now,” Doeren said of his linebacker unit. “Healthy, we got a ton of depth. But right now, we just got a lot of guys — none of them are serious injuries, they’re all guys that will be back within a week — today, there were five of them watching.”So, with these normally media-savvy coaches already using words such as “decimated” and “really, really worried”, what’s going to be said on October 2, when Big Ten play begins against Michigan State in East Lansing? Or two weeks later, when Ohio State invades Camp Randall? Or, once again, one week later in Iowa City?Now, before you crumple up the paper, chuck it in the trash and write me off as just an alarmist hack looking to raise trouble, let me present a reason for optimism: senior linebacker Blake Sorensen.Despite only having three starts at linebacker in his three years at UW, Sorensen has continually played a significant role in the Badger defense. Last year, the Eden Prairie, Minn. native played in all 13 games and proved his worth in the rotation, recording a career-high eight tackles against Northwestern and picking off his first pass against Hawaii. For the year, the former Mr. Football in Minnesota finished with 40 tackles — up from 14 apiece the previous two years — 1.5 tackles for loss and one sack.A player in Sorensen’s mold, though, does not have his worth accurately measured by statistics.“I love how smart he is, the way he sees football and learns it,” Doeren said of the senior linebacker. “His confidence in his own ability and knowledge base of our big picture — I wish I had five of him.”Coming from the generally even-keel Doeren, that praise speaks volumes of Sorensen’s ability. When Taylor — who originally tore the ACL in his right knee in week seven last season — was forced to have surgery again Aug. 17, reports had the starting outside linebacker out until possibility the MSU game. Consequently, Sorensen was thrust into the spotlight as the savior of the linebacker corps. This past week, the prognosis seemed to improve, though, as Bielema did not rule out Taylor for the opener.Regardless of when Taylor returns, Sorensen will see plenty of playing time, and knows how he will make his impact.“Just versatility,” Sorensen said of his best attributes. “I’m a senior, so I know all the positions pretty well and I feel like I can hop in any spot and do what the coaches ask and not miss a beat.”With running back John Clay garnering potential Heisman hype, quarterback Scott Tolzien receiving plenty of attention as leader of the offense and the mammoth offensive line picking up numerous preseason accolades, the defense has partly slid under the radar thus far. Given the depth the offense boasts at receiver, running back and on the O-line, the defensive depth chart raises more question marks.With Sorenson filling in for Taylor, reigning Big Ten Freshman of the Year Chris Borland manning the opposite outside linebacker spot and St. Jean roaming the middle of the unit, Doeren’s defense looks quite capable.Or, with Taylor healthy and Sorensen serving as the primary backup for all three linebacker spots, complimenting a deep defensive line and strong secondary, that defense has the potential to be something even better.“Just normal Wisconsin football,” Valai said of his defense. “Physical, tough and aggressive, man. Don’t taking nothing from nobody; don’t take ‘blank’ from nobody.”Mike is a junior majoring in journalism and communication arts. Like Sorensen’s role on the D? Worried about the depth? Let him know at [email protected]last_img read more

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Dougherty: Solidified quarterback spot puts Syracuse on better starting foot than last year

first_imgA year ago, as Syracuse geared up to face Penn State, it didn’t have a starting quarterback. Just two contenders — Terrel Hunt and Oklahoma transfer Drew Allen — fighting for the season’s first snap and all that would follow.Previous quarterback Ryan Nassib hardly had stains on his New York Giants jersey at training camp, yet the three-year starter felt much further away. There was no stability in a position expected to embody it.“Last year I was thinking, ‘Man, am I going to get pulled? Who’s going to start?’” Hunt, SU’s starting quarterback, said in a video on Cuse.com at the start of training camp. “So now I’m actually going in more relaxed.”To this point, Hunt’s earned that right. A year removed from fighting for his job, it’s easy to forget that Allen won it before Hunt finally and forever replaced him within a month. But what isn’t hard to notice is the stark difference between the weeks leading into Penn State and the buildup SU currently wades through.Syracuse opens the season against Villanova at 7:30 p.m. in the Carrier Dome on Friday, and there are still question marks on both sides of the ball. Its quarterback isn’t one of them, which is settling to say the least.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“It’s not like competing with Drew was bad,” Hunt said. “I learned a lot from that and it made me a better player, but going in knowing I’m going to be the starter is nice. And it’s better for the team to know who is going to lead them Week 1 — me or anyone else.”Hunt always draws a crowd at interview sessions. When you’re a starting quarterback in the Atlantic Coast Conference, it comes with the territory — but the questions have expectedly changed.It was always easy to locate Hunt, Allen and quarterbacks coach Tim Lester the week before the Orange traveled to face the Nittany Lions at MetLife Stadium. They’d each be at the center of a crowd, with everyone holding a recorder or camera in one hand and a softball in the other.Now Hunt talks about the coming season and the offense he’s set to lead, and the only competition he’s asked about is between Austin Wilson, Mitch Kimble and AJ Long. Those guys are fighting for the backup quarterback spot.“I think there’s always a sense of calm when you know that signal caller, how he is in the huddle or how he is in on the sidelines or how he is adjusting to things,” Syracuse head coach Scott Shafer said during training camp. “So I think there’s a lot of comfort with those players that are back that have played with him.”Shafer doesn’t have to learn Hunt’s snap count or play-calling cadence, but he seems just as comfortable. When addressing Villanova in the Syracuse team room at the Petty-Iacolano Football Wing on Saturday, he didn’t once mention “Hunt,” “Terrel” or “quarterback,” pertaining to his team.In all, the team’s preseason rhetoric has taken a 180-degree turn. Shafer mentioned the Wildcats’ John Robertson as a dual-threat quarterback that the Orange is heavily preparing for. As far as his depth chart, he said he wants to have a good idea of what it will look like by Tuesday — with decisions kept in-house before they’re unveiled with Friday’s kickoff.But Hunt’s penciled in and that’s not as mundane as it may seem. On the heels of a competition that consumed the first third of last season, the lack of one has this year’s Orange on a more convincing track.“Terrel established himself as a leader toward the middle and definitely at the end of last season,” offensive coordinator George McDonald said. “It’s not like a new phenomenon like, ‘Terrel’s the leader.’ He showed it, he earned, and the (offense has) continued to grow.”Jesse Dougherty is the sports editor at The Daily Orange where his column appears occasionally. He can be reached at [email protected] or on Twitter at @dougherty_jesse. Comments Published on August 25, 2014 at 2:00 am Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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