Minister committed to voluntary pay reviews

first_imgDTI minister Patricia Hewitt has promised to keep pay audits voluntary inthe private sector. Speaking at the Unions21 conference in London, the secretary of state fortrade and industry said there were already many statutory obligations onemployers and that adding to them was not the way forward. Rather, she said, changes in corporate governance coming in with theInformation and Consultation Directive and changes to operating and financialreview laws will make things more transparent. “Simply picking out equal pay audits is not the way forward,” shesaid. Hewitt also defended the Government’s desire to retain the opt-out to theWorking Time Directive, which allows people to work more than the EU maximum of48 hours a week. She said it was important that people have control of their working hoursand can change these according to their needs. However, TUC general secretary, Brendan Barber, also speaking at theconference, was ‘staggered’ that the Government wanted to retain the opt-out. “Three out of five people who work more than 40 hours a week want ashorter week,” he said. “It doesn’t take a genius to see that union/government relations arenot at their best,” Barber admitted, adding that the Government hadoriginally opposed the Information and Consultation Directive and has alsotried to block other EU innovations such as the Agency Workers Directive andthe introduction of corporate killing laws. He said the Government should look beyond full employment as some jobs werestill badly paid, and it also needed to address the issues of childcare and thechoice of work patterns. Hewitt agreed on this point. She said that with unemployment now at itslowest point in 30 years, the Government must shift its focus from ‘more jobs’to ‘better jobs’. By Quentin Reade Related posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Article Minister committed to voluntary pay reviewsOn 16 Mar 2004 in Personnel Todaylast_img read more

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Indiana Makes Gains In Permanent Placement Early Intervention For Juveniles

first_imgOnline Extra: Judicial Roundtable 2014Indiana Makes Gains In Permanent Placement Early Intervention For Juveniles Wayne Superior Judge Darrin Dolehanty makes it a priority in every case to appoint an attorney for a juvenile as soon as the court learns a child has been detained.  He doesn’t give the parent or child a chance to waive that right to counsel before the proceedings begin.  “As soon as we get word about a detention or petition, an attorney is appointed,” the judge said. “I don’t know if you can do it more quickly than that, but unfortunately many counties don’t do that every time. That’s a shame, because this is something that has real meaning and we need to make sure children are represented.”Many counties throughout Indiana don’t operate the way Wayne Superior 3 does in appointing counsel or sidestepping waivers. A proposed draft rule from the Indiana State Bar Association is being submitted to the state judiciary’s rulemaking committee to address the right to counsel issue, putting in place a systematic requirement that youth have adequate attorney representation from the start of their experience in Indiana’s juvenile justice system.JaeNue Hanger Hanger“This is a very big deal for children in our juvenile system,” said Indianapolis civil rights attorney JauNae Hanger, who chairs the ISBA’s Civil Rights of Children Committee that has studied and created the proposed rule during the past year. “We’re trying to bring consistency so it doesn’t vary so much county by county. We’ve been on the road to getting here for a long time.”The problem Nationwide, the discussion has been ongoing since the landmark case In re Gault from the Supreme Court of the United States in 1967 that established the right to counsel for juveniles. The Indiana-specific discussion stretches back more than a decade, but evidence of the state system’s flaws came to light in April 2006. A study commissioned by the Indiana Juvenile Justice Task Force revealed the shocking depth of defects in the juvenile justice system and how many kids don’t have adequate access to an attorney.Although Indiana Code 31-32-4-2 requires the appointment of counsel at the first detention or initial hearing, many courts forfeit that appointment using IC 31-32-5-1 that allows a parent to waive his or her child’s rights.The report’s findings show about half of youth routinely waived their right to counsel and therefore didn’t have a sufficient understanding of their rights and the benefits of representation. More than a third of youth proceeded through court without counsel, and the rate was as high as 80 percent in two counties. The study found that when a juvenile consulted with a lawyer, nearly 90 percent never or rarely waived their right to counsel, but when a youth only consulted with a parent, about 75 percent waived the right.After the report’s release, many responded that they’d heard anecdotal evidence of the problem but they didn’t truly understand the magnitude of the issues. The state vowed change, but systematic efforts to improve that attorney access have not happened in the past five years.Some courts have strengthened and increased their appointment practices, and statewide training of judges and public defenders has occurred annually. But much remains the same and many say a child’s access to counsel continues to largely depend on what county and court system that child is in.Larry Landis, executive director of the Indiana Public Defender Council, said counties that do appoint counsel in every case say it helps expedite dispositions and actually saves taxpayer money in the long run because the kids are less likely to get back into the system. Local counsel know service providers and out-of-state placement options better and help make the best decisions based on a child’s individualized needs, he said.“Saying children have the right to a lawyer isn’t enough,” he said. “As of now, it’s a paper right in Indiana and we don’t go beyond that in actually making sure they have counsel when they need it. Those who need or want counsel must also have the ability to get an attorney across the board, not based on the location.”With the ISBA’s proposal, the state’s juvenile justice community sees hope that Indiana is finally moving forward on addressing this issue.In October, the state bar association’s governing board unanimously approved a draft rule requiring adequate counsel in juvenile proceedings. The draft says that an attorney would be appointed prior to the first-occurring detention or initial hearing and that no child or parent could waive his or her right to counsel without first “engaging in meaningful consultation” with an attorney. Specifically, it says any waiver would have to be made “knowingly and voluntarily” in open court.“This doesn’t create anything new that’s not already in the constitution,” Hanger said. “It just provides safeguards to make sure that children get counsel.”Amy Karozos, a staff attorney with the Youth Law T.E.A.M. of Indiana who chaired the ISBA committee when the 2006 report was released, said she’s pleased to finally see movement on this issue. She recalls her days as a state public defender when she observed so many children in the Department of Correction who hadn’t been represented at any stage of the legal process or had such inadequate representation that they didn’t recall if they’d consulted an attorney.“This would make a big difference in helping kids understand their rights,” Karozos said about the rule change. “All children would be treated the same, no matter where they’re from. This would be significant, so you don’t have justice by jurisdiction.”Those who’ve helped nurture the proposal during the past five years anticipate a potential decision could come by 2013 – if the Indiana Supreme Court agrees a rule change is needed and this is the best way to go about improving the system. Once the proposal goes to the Supreme Court’s Committee on Rules of Practice and Procedure there is no set timeline on a decision as to whether the rule revision is warranted or how that public comment and revision process would happen.Kim Brooks Tandy, a lawyer who leads the Kentucky-based Children’s Law Center and principal author of the Indiana access to counsel assessment in 2006, said about 20 states have had similar assessments done. Some places, such as Illinois, Kentucky and Texas, have court rules or statutes that don’t permit waivers at any stage of the juvenile delinquent process, while other jurisdictions, such as North Carolina, have created state-level offices to ensure more appellate review and public defense for juveniles. Ohio is in the middle of a five-year rule-change process with the public comment period closing on a proposal to restrict waivers, similar to what Indiana is considering.Although Indiana has moved more slowly than she expected, Tandy is encouraged by the ISBA and overall legal community support here.“Sometimes, you have to build an infrastructure,” she said. “This has happened slowly, but you can’t rush these things. I’m encouraged that it’s picking up momentum now. The next challenge after this, if it’s passed, would be implementation. This can be a part of the culture of a particular county, and it’s important to make sure that becomes the state’s culture on appointing counsel. We don’t want to wait until the point of a child being committed to the DOC, and someone looks at a file and sees that child has never been represented. That’s a failure for our system.”•FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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NISCO in Bremen joins the fight against COVID-19

first_imgCoronavirusIndianaLocalNews NISCO in Bremen joins the fight against COVID-19 Previous articleTV program to spotlight unsolved killings of 2 Indiana teensNext articleEconomic effects of COVID-19 affecting more hotel business in Michiana 95.3 MNCNews/Talk 95.3 Michiana’s News Channel is your breaking news and weather station for northern Indiana and southwestern Michigan. Pinterest WhatsApp (Photo supplied/NISCO) Joining the ranks of Hoosiers helping Hoosiers, Nishikawa Cooper LLC. in Bremen has allocated resources and started producing and distributing a polyethylene isolation gown to help first responders stay safe in COVID-19 situations.At their manufacturing facility in Marshall County, NISCO owns five multi-function laser cutters that are also commonly used in the garment industry. In the company’s normal day-to-day operations the cutters are part of the process of producing their vehicle door sound dampening products.Marshall County Economic Development Corporation reported that it only took NISCO less than a week to design and begin production. Gowns are continuing to be manufactured and distributed to Indiana first responders daily. NISCO has already produced enough new gowns to distribute to every fire department in Marshall County.“This is tremendous,” commented Scott Ford, Associate Vice President for Economic Development at the University of Notre Dame. “The example offers a ray of hope in these trying times. NISCO’s leadership provides a ‘proof-of-concept’ that will be so helpful in recruiting additional manufacturers to consider a similar path.”“The re-engineering that NISCO’s pulled off is more than just genius… it’s a terrific example of who we are in Marshall County, Indiana” added Jerry Chavez, President & CEO of the Marshall County Economic Development Corporation. Pinterest By 95.3 MNC – March 30, 2020 0 555 Facebook Google+ Google+ WhatsApp Facebook Twitter Twitterlast_img read more

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Bruce and Poyet play down spat

first_img Bruce was also grateful to Burt for his persistence in holding him back when the red mist descended. “I thanked him, I’ll probably have to buy him a beer too,” he said. “A big heavyweight like me and he was a lightweight to be fair to him. He was exhausted trying to keep hold of me.” Poyet was less forthcoming in his post-match comments. Asked to offer an account of the incident with Bruce, he said: “No, because I am old-fashioned. What happened stays on the pitch. “I’ve spoken to Steve and shaken hands. I just saw him, nothing happened. It’s football. It’s passion. “I have to convince the officials not to put any buckets of drinks around me. I have no regrets whatsoever. If that is a bad image for football I am sorry but I don’t think it’s something to worry about.” Poyet was at least clear that Rodwell was the victim of inconsistency from referee Mike Dean, suggesting Paul McShane had won a free-kick in similar circumstances to Rodwell. “I was not happy with the decision of McShane. He was diving like he was in a theatre, dancing, ballet and then he got a free-kick for Hull. “And then Jack was diving and got a yellow card and free-kick against him. So give me one, you cannot get both against you. “McShane, in the first half, jumped with both feet and went down like he had been shot, but he won a free-kick. I was just asking for the same treatment, simple as that.” The rival managers clashed after Poyet was sent to the stands in the first half for reacting to Jack Rodwell’s caution for diving by angrily kicking a container of water bottles. The Uruguayan made a beeline for Bruce before making his way and – after an angry exchange of words and gestures – the Tigers boss lunged towards Poyet before being restrained by assistant referee Stuart Burt. Neither man covered themselves in glory in the heated incident, but tempers had cooled somewhat by full-time. Bruce admitted behaving like a “raging idiot” for his part, while Poyet declared himself “old fashioned” and preferred to leave the matter on the pitch. The pair shook hands in a KC Stadium corridor after seeing goals from Dame N’Doye and Rodwell cancel each other out, but there was plenty of simmering resentment beneath the surface. “We all do stupid things and we will wake up to stupid headlines. We’ll both regret it in the morning, but we get on with our lives,” said Bruce. “These things happen in the heat of the moment, grown men acting like a couple of children. “What he said will stay between me and him…it’s up to Gus to reveal what he said but I don’t think he will. “It wasn’t very pleasant, like ‘have a nice evening Steve’. But I’m not going to reveal it to sell your newspapers. “The critical thing was that Gus has seen it differently about Jack Rodwell diving to gain advantage. The referee got it right, but I think by his reaction Gus saw it the other way.” Press Association Steve Bruce and Gus Poyet both attempted to downplay their touchline spat after an ill-tempered 1-1 draw between Hull and Sunderland. last_img read more

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Sumner County Sports Schedule: Dec. 1- Dec. 5

first_imgWELLINGTON HIGH SCHOOL BasketballGirls- Winfield, home4 p.m. 7B Followed by 7A Then 8A WELLINGTON MIDDLE SCHOOL Tuesday, Dec. 1    WrestlingEl Dorado tournament9 a.m. JV WrestlingWinfield9 a.m. BasketballBoys – Haysville West, home4 p.m. 7B Followed by 7A Then 8A South Barber at Caldwell Belle Plaine at BluestemG- 6 p.m. B- 7:30 p.m. Friday, Dec. 4   WELLINGTON MIDDLE SCHOOL Girls- Haysville West, away4 p.m. 7B, 7A, 8B, 8A.center_img Conway Springs at Chaparral Fairfield at Oxford Attica at Argonia Follow us on Twitter. Boys – Winfield, away4 p.m. 7B, 7A, 8B, 8A. Saturday, Dec. 5    SUMNER COUNTY BASKETBALL Thursday, Dec. 3   Sumner Newscow report — Basketball starts tomorrow for Wellington Middle School teams. It will also start for five Sumner County high school teams this Friday. Wellington high school wrestling team starts grappling on Saturday. Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comments Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. There are no comments posted yet. Be the first one! Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new commentslast_img read more

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