Fulham v Liverpool: Bent starts

first_imgDarren Bent comes into the Fulham starting line-up for the match against Liverpool, who are still without Daniel Agger and Glen Johnson, although Agger is on the bench.Fulham: Stekelenburg; Riether, Heitinga, Burn, Riise; Tunnicliffe, Sidwell, Kvist, Richardson; Holtby; Bent.Subs: Stockdale, Hangeland, Kasami, Kačaniklić, Duff, Cole, Parker.Liverpool: Mignolet; Flanagan, Toure, Skrtel, Cissokho; Sterling, Gerrard, Henderson, Coutinho; Suarez, Sturridge.Subs: Jones, Agger, Kelly, Allen, Moses, Teixeira, Aspas.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img

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Muscle Power Is Designed, Not Evolutionary

first_imgThe wonder of muscle inspires both awe at its design and opportunities for evolutionary storytelling.Fifty years of assumptions about how muscle fibers work is being set aside, reported PhysOrg, with the discovery that its components don’t just slide in one axis, but bulge out in 3-D.   The article, titled “Biceps bulge, calves curve, 50-year-old assumptions muscled aside,” states:The basics of how a muscle generates power remain the same: Filaments of myosin tugging on filaments of actin shorten, or contract, the muscle – but the power doesn’t just come from what’s happening straight up and down the length of the muscle, as has been assumed for 50 years.Instead, University of Washington-led research shows that as muscles bulge, the filaments are drawn apart from each other, the myosin tugs at sharper angles over greater distances, and it’s that action that deserves credit for half the change in muscle force scientists have been measuring.It makes sense; if fibers stretched in only one direction, why would biceps bulge outward?  The fact that muscle fibers don’t simply slide past each other but buckle, generating forces in multiple dimensions, adds to the wonder of its design.Fish Muscle EvolutionHumans are not the only animals with muscle, of course; fish use muscles, too.  Muscle imprints from extinct fossil fish provided a backdrop for evolutionists from Australia to manufacture “A Muscular Perspective on Vertebrate Evolution,” Shigeru Kuratani wrote in Science about their paper in the same issue, “Fossil Musculature of the Most Primitive Jawed Vertebrates.”  The amazing design of muscle was less important to these evolutionists than whether or not certain fossils can be placed into an ancestral sequence.  The puzzle of how soft muscle imprints could be preserved for 400 million years was less important to them than divining phylogenetic trees from the data.Although they assumed the evolution of fish, the paper’s authors actually had little to say about evolution.  “Their evolutionary importance hinges on whether eubrachythoracid musculature is specialized or primitive relative to that of sharks” is one example of a reserved statement; another, “Hypothetical reconstructions are not able to recover the full complexity of this musculature, either on the basis of biomechanical analysis or phylogenetic bracketing, and are thus liable to give a false picture of muscular evolution at the origin of gnathostomes.”  In the end, they could only hope that future studies of “exceptionally preserved fossils will continue to provide essential data for the reconstruction of vertebrate soft anatomy, particularly in groups with no close living relatives.”Kuratani, though, couldn’t get enough evolution into his Perspective article.  In every case, though, he merely assumed evolution, without showing how the fossil actually helps establish a sequential list of lucky mutations leading to muscular fish:On page 160 this issue, Trinajstic et al. systematically describe the muscle anatomy of three fossil animals from the earliest jawed vertebrate group, the placoderms, which evolved soon after the acquisition of the jaw. Knowledge of the morphology of these earliest jawed vertebrates, especially with respect to soft tissues such as muscles, is necessary for understanding how vertebrates evolved.How vertebrates evolved:  This hypothetical scenario of neck and cucullaris muscle evolution builds on the data presented by Trinajstic et al. and uses a simplified vertebrate phylogeny.The primitive shoulder girdle in placoderms, as suggested by Trinajstic et al., may be an intermediate state of neck evolution that simultaneously reveals the beginnings of a jawed vertebrate novelty, the cucullaris.At one point, though, Kuratani was stumped.  A complex feature was found in the primitive ancestor.  His response?  He just swept aside the concern, and proceeded on with his “hypothetical scenario” –The presence of the transverse abdominal muscles in placoderms is another mysterious finding of Trinajstic et al., because this muscle has been thought to be present only in tetrapods. Phylogenetic importance or homology aside, this muscle is potentially similar to a component of the trunk muscle in tetrapods, the abaxial muscle, which also develops as the result of myoblast migration and interactions between myoblasts and the embryonic mesenchymal environment of the lateral body wall.If the muscle patterns reported by Trinajstic et al. are found to reflect the general morphology of the placoderms, it would suggest that the developmental bases for the muscle anatomy of modern jawed vertebrates were present, in primitive form, around the time of the appearance of the functional jaw. This would stimulate even greater curiosity about the anatomy of more ancient stem gnathostomes such as ostracoderms, because the beginning of the jawed vertebrate body plan is likely to be buried in the anatomy of these animals.Can “phylogenetic importance or homology” be cast aside so whimsically by an evolutionist?  Wouldn’t casting aside those matters undermine evolution itself?This exposè has been brought to you by Creation-Evolution Headlines, just the latest in its 12-year arsenal of similar examples of handwaving and pseudoscientific fabling about evolution in major scientific journals.  They can’t hide their dumbfloundering confabulations any more.  We are showing them to the world.  Flex your muscle and take up the fight to restore the truth of design to science, which these DODO dogmatists twist into mythoids about evillusion.  (For definitions of these terms, see our Darwin Dictionary.)Enjoy your muscles today.  It’s uncanny how we can order muscles to do things.  Our general orders, like orders from a general, set the armies of actin and myosin molecules in motion in ways we can’t begin to fathom from our command perspective.  Your muscles deserve good treatment.  Feed them well and give them some good healthy work to do every day, then enjoy how good they can make you look.  Finish it with sincere thanks to your Creator who granted us these wonderful systems.(Visited 14 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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A Computer Just Clobbered Four Pros At Poker

Tuomas Sandholm, a Carnegie Mellon computer scientist who created the program with his Ph.D. student Noam Brown, was giddy last week on the match’s livestream, at one point cheering for his bot as it turned over a full house versus human pro Jason Les’s flush in a huge pot, and proudly comparing Libratus’s triumph to Deep Blue’s monumental win over Garry Kasparov in chess.And, indeed, some robot can now etch heads-up no-limit Texas Hold ’em (2017) — alongside checkers (1995), chess (1997), Othello (1997), Scrabble (c. 2006), limit Hold ’em (2008), Jeopardy! (2011) and Go (2016) — into the marble cenotaph of human-dominated intellectual pursuits.Brown told me that he was keen to tackle other versions of poker with his A.I. algorithms. What happens when a bot like this sits down at a table with many other players, rather than a single foe, for example? Sandholm, on the other hand, is quick to say that this isn’t really about poker at all. “The AI’s algorithms are not for poker: they are game independent,” his daily email updates read. The other “games” the algorithms may be applied to in the future: “negotiation, cybersecurity, military setting, auctions, finance, strategic pricing, as well as steering evolution and biological adaptation.”Another of the human pros, Jimmy Chou, had had just about enough of Libratus. About three weeks ago, I was in a Pittsburgh casino for the beginning of a 20-day man-versus-machine poker battle. Four top human pros were beginning to take on a state-of-the-art artificial intelligence program running on a brand-new supercomputer in a game called heads-up no-limit Texas Hold ’em. The humans’ spirits were high as they played during the day and dissected the bot’s strategy over short ribs and glasses of wine late into the evening.On Monday evening, however, the match ended and the human pros were in the hole about $1.8 million. For some context, the players (four men and the machine, called Libratus) began each of the 120,000 hands with $20,000 in play money, posting blinds of $50 and $100. Here’s how the days progressed: Received my biggest beating of the challenge just now -180k, gg Libby. Going to miss you buddy. #brainsvsai #beatdown #humanity— Jimmy chou (@Chouchoupoker) January 30, 2017Last week, between especially frustrating hands and with the match quickly slipping away, Les jokingly suspected that the poker match was “being co-opted by the Carnegie Mellon psych department. ‘What can we put a human through?’”Read more: “The Machines Are Coming For Poker” Share on Facebook read more

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More work to do Turner Lighty not satisfied with Big Ten title

Earlier in the year, junior David Lighty declared his goals for the remainder of the season. A regular season Big Ten Championship was a start, Lighty said, but the Buckeyes had their sights set even further. Tuesday night, Lighty and his teammates completed step one with a 73-57 win over Illinois — a win that earned OSU at least a share of the conference title. But not long after the celebration was over, Lighty spoke of what lies ahead. “Our hard work, right now, is paying off,” Lighty said. “We brought everything together, but it’s not over yet.”After more than a week off, the Buckeyes will return to the hardwood next week in Indianapolis in the Big Ten Tournament. After navigating through a brutal conference schedule, overcoming an injury to junior Evan Turner and earning the No. 1 seed in the tournament, OSU should be a considerable favorite to win. The NCAA Tournament begins the following week and the Buckeyes will likely be a No. 3, or even a No. 2 seed. Turner said that, with everything his team has been through, they will enter the tournament season with the utmost confidence. “All this hard work we put in, always persevering through tough times,” Turner said. “All the stuff we did growing as a team and going through all the controversy we went through. It’s just amazing.”Turner has often said that, prior to this season, he has yet to accomplish anything of merit in an OSU uniform. As a possible top-five pick in this year’s NBA draft, he said he would hate to leave school without making his mark.As fellow junior Lighty said after Tuesday’s win, they’re on a mission to do just that. “We can’t leave without accomplishing anything,” Lighty said. “So far our mark was winning an NIT Championship [in 2008], losing in the Big Ten Championship and losing in the first round of the NCAA Tournament [last year]. That leaves a sour taste in your mouth, and you don’t want to be remembered for that.”Whether or not Turner and Lighty make the mark they want when it’s all said and done, remains to be seen. But with a regular season title under their belt, their mark is no longer a losing one. They won’t leave Columbus as runner-ups or first-round NCAA losers. They’ll leave known at least as 2010 Big Ten Champions. For Turner, however, that isn’t quite enough.“It just feels great, but it’s not over yet,” Turner said. “We have a couple more trophies to worry about.” read more

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Preview Marseille vs RB Salzburg

first_imgShock semi-finalists Red Bull Salzburg will be looking to continue their historic run as they travel to France to face Marseille in the first leg of their Europa League tieThe two sides met twice in the group stages of the competition with Salzburg emerging with a narrow 1-0 win, courtesy of a Moanes Dabour goal. The second game ended goalless back in December at the Stade Velodrome.Marseille is being widely tipped as the favourites to progress against the Austrian Bundesliga leaders, but head coach Rudi Garcia will be without several key players for the important clash.Goalkeeper Steve Mandanda and defensive midfielder Boubacar Kamara are out through injury. While Left-back Hiroki Sakai is doubtful due to an injury he sustained against Lille.On the other hand, Salzburg have got a totally healthy squad with no suspensions giving Marco Rose the chance to field his strongest team for the first leg in France with the club having been undefeated in 16 of their last 17 matches in the Europa League.Probable line-upsMarseilleMarseille needing to replace Florian Thauvin Taimoor Khan – September 12, 2019 Florian Thauvin is out of action due to an ankle injury which means that Olympique de Marseille have to quickly seek a solution. It’s…4-2-3-1Pele, Amavi, Rolando, Rami, Sarr, Gustavo, Lopez, Ocampos, Payet, Thauvin, GermainRB Salzburg4-3-1-2Walke, Ulmer, Caleta-Car, Ramalho, Lainer, Berisha, Samassekou, Haidara, Schlager, Hee-Chan, Dabbur (Data obtained by WhoScored)last_img read more

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