The Rugby Week in Review: May 23-29

first_img Catch up in the Rugby week that was: May 23-29…it’s been a long one… Schalk Brits and co celebrate winning the 2011 Aviva Premiership Everyone loves a Bank holiday, especially when it’s littered with so many sporting events! But what everyone loves more are Championship deciders. And boy have they been eventful…Proud moment: Dad Andy Farrell with son Owen Farrell at TwickenhamTo Twickenham where the Aviva Premiership Final do-over was held between Leicester Tigers and Saracens. The nail-biting final proved to be a tale of the boot, bar the only try scored by James Short nearly on the half hour mark, with an assist by Man of the Match Schalk Brits. In the end Owen Farrell held his nerve and proved his worth, kicking Saracens to their first premiership title beating Leicester 18-22.Thomond Park was the venue for the Magners League Final, on Saturday where Munster proved too much for European Champions Leinster beating them 19-9. They may be the Kings of Europe but Munster brought them back down to Earth with a bump, denying them a fairy-tale end to the season.Marler receiving treatmentEngland faced the Baa Baas at Twickenham on Sunday, with what can be considered a Saxons team. It was a try-fest at Twickenham as it witnessed yet another thrilling game at the weekend which saw the Baa baas claim a 38-32 victory. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Gavin Henson has been added to the unemplyed list, leaving Toulon due to their lack of budget next year and Henson’s probable World Cup commitments with Wales.Wednesday night was the 13th annual RPA Computacenter Rugby Players’ Awards at Grosvenor House Hotel, and the RugbyWorld team must have been well behaved because we were all allowed out for the night. And a beautiful night it was. The winners of the evening were… Finally, a quick look to the goings-on in the Southern Hemisphere…The Waratahs are running low on luck about now, and boy does coach Chris Hickey know it. After their 26-21 loss to the Sharks, their injury bench now includes Sekope Kepu (knee), Ryan Cross (knee), Berrick Barnes (head), plus Drew Mitchell (ankle).center_img LONDON, ENGLAND – MAY 28: Saracens coach Andy Farrell tosses a kicking tee to son Owen Farrell during the AVIVA Premiership Final between Leicester Tigers and Saracens at Twickenham Stadium on May 28, 2011 in London, United Kingdom. (Photo by Mike Hewitt/Getty Images) Sitting proudly at the top of the Super Rugby table are the Reds, after Quade Cooper kicked (a last minute penalty) them to a 17-16 historic victory over the Crusaders at Suncorp. That’s now 12 straight home wins in case you were wondering.Week in Review: May 16-22 |    May 9-15 |    May 2 – 8last_img read more

Read More »

The scrum laws explained!

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS FOR THE January edition of Rugby World, we visited Bath’s training ground, at Farleigh House, to see their brand new scrum machine in action. Developed alongside Rhino, the new machine has been set up to replicate a match-day scrum in accordance to the new laws. To see them explained in full, watch the video below! Click here to find out what’s in this month’s edition of Rugby World.last_img

Read More »

Hotshot: Northampton and Scotland U20 back-row Devante Onojaife

first_imgRW VERDICT: Onojaife cites his mum as the biggest influence on his career. Having settled at back-row and been part of Scotland’s U20 World Cup side, he’s looking to make a big impression on new Northampton coach Chris Boyd.This article originally appeared in the August 2018 issue of Rugby World magazine. Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. On the ball: Devante Onojaife in action during the Junior World Cup (Getty Images) TAGS: Northampton Saints Tough. That first year at Saints I was developing and trying to be a prop, then I had a talk with Jim Mallinder and he saw me as a back-row. So I lost a bit of weight and worked on my conditioning. It was quite challenging. I played at Cambridge for two seasons, which helped me.Your brother, Jordan, plays too… He’s a lock at Ealing. We’re quite competitive but have always helped each other. He did the same process as me at Stowe.How did representing Scotland come about? I qualify through my grandmother, who was born in Edinburgh. I’m not sure how they found out but I played Scotland U18, England U18 and now Scotland U20.What are your goals going forward? I want to hit the ground running in pre-season. It’s my last year in the academy so it’s a big year to try to improve and we’ve got a new coach. He doesn’t know any of the players so we’re all starting from scratch; it’s a big chance for all of us.What do you do off the field? I study business management, specialising in marketing, with the Open University. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Get to know the Northampton Saint who represents Scotland U20 – Devante Onojaife Northampton and Scotland U20 back-row Devante Onojaife Date of birth 15 April 1998 Born Colchester Club Northampton Country Scotland Position Back-rowHow long have you played rugby?I was born in Essex but moved to Dubai when I was nine because of my dad’s job – he’s a chemical engineer – and I started playing when I was 12 as it was on the school curriculum. Before then I’d mainly played football.How did you find it? I didn’t know any rules and the first time I got the ball I ran the wrong way! I must have enjoyed it, though, as I kept doing it. When I was younger I was big for my age and was asked to tone it down in football. In rugby, I didn’t need to do that.How did you get spotted by Northampton? We used to come back from Dubai in the summer to see family and my mum found a rugby residency course at Stowe School. I went to a couple of trials and Saints asked me to come to a session with the U18s, then kept in contact. I went to Stowe for sixth form, played for the U18s both years and was lucky enough to get signed.What positions have you played? I started off in the back row, then switched to tighthead prop and now I’m back in the back row. I was signed by Northampton as a prop and I’d got into the England U18s as a prop.How was the switch? last_img read more

Read More »

60 Years of Rugby World: Greatest Tries of the 1960s

first_imgJacob Whitehead runs through the top ten Test tries from the Sixties There’s always something brilliant about a forward doing something not expected of them, an early example occurring courtesy of legendary All Blacks captain Sir Wilson Whineray (see 4:55 on the video).Part of a 36-3 victory, the New Zealand prop cheekily dummied the Barbarians full-back before casually dotting the ball down beneath the posts of Cardiff Arms Park.Andy Hancock (England) v Scotland, 1965 60 Years of Rugby World: Greatest Tries of the 1960sTo celebrate 60 years of Rugby World magazine, we’re counting down the top ten international tries of every decade.First up is the 1960s, which saw the birth of more organised back play, leading to some quite sensational early scores…Mannetjies Roux (South Africa) v British & Irish Lions, 1962Mannetjies Roux put the seal on a fine series win for the Springboks with a remarkable try on the Highveld.For the first of his two tries in that Test (and the first on this video), Roux took a short pass from his fly-half and seared past two Lions defenders before swerving inside to beat centre Mike Weston and captain Dickie Jeeps. Only the referee, Captain PA Myburgh, proved capable of keeping up.Richard Sharp (England) v Scotland, 1963 The character in Bernard Cornwell’s Sharpe novels was named after one of Cornwall’s greatest sportsmen, dashing fly-half Richard Sharp.His greatest moment ensured that England would win the 1963 Five Nations, with a soaring parabola in which no less than four Scottish defenders were fooled by his dummies.Wilson Whineray (New Zealand) v Barbarians, 1964 Day job: Police officer Mike Coulman scored a fantastic try in the Sixties (Getty Images) Tries were only worth three points in these days, and England were under pressure as they trailed 3-0, having already lost to Wales and Ireland in that Five Natons.In the final minutes Andy Hancock, winning only his second cap, received the ball deep in his own 22 with a Scottish wall bearing down on him. One hand-off, two in-and-outs, four flailing defenders and 90 metres later and Hancock would collapse over the line to score a try (see 1:20 on the video) immortalised in the BBC Grandstand opening credits.Keith Jarrett (Wales) v England, 1967 Keith Jarrett emerged onto the international scene as an 18-year-old, selected at full-back against the English despite having never played there before.center_img It mattered little, as the Newport teen burst onto a probing kick with explosive pace, beating two English defenders before they’d even sighted the flyer. He’d make the cover of Rugby World two months later and you can read his take on the try in the 60th anniversary issue of the magazine.FIND OUT WHAT’S INSIDE RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE’S 60TH ANNIVERSARY EDITIONKel Tremain (New Zealand) v Australia, 1967This was a try (see 2:00 on the video) conjured by the iconic scrum-half Sid Going in New Zealand’s 29-9 Bledisloe Cup victory.He ducked between two Australian defenders to start a flowing move, before once more seizing on the loose ball and slipping the pass inside to onrushing flanker Kel Tremain.Mike Coulman (England) v Scotland, 1968Modern Test rugby has seen the prop emerge as an attacking weapon, but sowing the seeds for Kyle Sinckler and Ellis Genge was dual-code international Mike Coulman. He was notoriously quick for a front-rower, as he showed against Scotland in England’s only victory of that year’s Five Nations (see 0:20 on the video).A looped lineout throw into midfield found the onrushing Moseley player, who cut a swathe through the defence before bulldozing over the top of unfortunate Scottish full-back Stewart Wilson.Frik du Preez (South Africa) v British and Irish Lions, 1968South Africa have a proud tradition of producing second-rows, and one of the finest and earliest was Frik du Preez, named South Africa’s best player of the 20th century.Not only was his try in the first Test against the Lions the decisive score but a rare example of a successful move around the front of the lineout. Du Preez would gallop through from halfway to score in the corner, outstripping the desperate cover tackle of Lions captain Tom Kiernan.Barry John (Wales) v England, 1969      Keith Jarrett, this time playing centre, gathered his own chip to alley-oop the ball to the advancing Barry John, one of Wales’ finest fly-halves.Setting off on a weaving run, John beat four English defenders, the final sidestep the most audacious of all, to win Wales the Five Nations with a 30-9 victory over England.Piet Greyling (South Africa) v England, 1969Amid fierce anti-apartheid protests, the touring South African team failed to win any Internationals. However, they did score a try (see 0:35 on the video) impressive not for the precision or flair of the attack but the ferocity of their defence.England tried to gather the loose ball three times, fumbling each time under intense South African pressure before Springbok hooker Don Walton intercepted and fed destructive flanker Piet Greyling for the game’s first try.Let us know what you think are the greatest tries of the 1960s by emailing [email protected] LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

Read More »

First female Anglican bishop for Africa elected

first_imgFirst female Anglican bishop for Africa elected Anne Warrington Wilson says: July 20, 2012 at 2:42 pm What wonderful news — the clear acceptance of women in leadership in yet another province of the Anglican Communion — and a clear call for rejoicing! Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Thomas Vocca says: Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Anglican Communion, Christopher Epting says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Hopkinsville, KY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Thomas Vocca says: Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Comments (24) Submit a Press Release Kevin Sanders says: July 19, 2012 at 5:47 pm Like the C of E? Tim Yeager says: Rector Smithfield, NC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET V. Tupper Morehead, MD, MDiv, TSSF says: Lynn Marini says: July 19, 2012 at 6:29 pm This is cause for great joy & thanksgiving. There is now a foot in the door of the Anglican Church. No doubt they may go through similar commotion we went through with the election of +Gene Robinson. We have become , in my opinion, a stronger Church. Growth is never without its growing pains. Blessing on Bp. Elect Wambukoya and her Diocese. The Spirit is alive and moving. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI July 19, 2012 at 9:49 pm Hope we get information on how/when we could go there for consecration celebration! July 20, 2012 at 3:57 am The reformation continues . Glory Be. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET July 19, 2012 at 8:42 pm This is great news, I am so happy for her, I know the Holy Spirit is working through her. Many Blessings to the new Bishop elect. Maria R.Forman, All Saint’s Episcopal Church, Redding, Ca Joan Desilets says: Rector Collierville, TN Submit a Job Listing Women’s Ministry Harriet B. Linville says: July 19, 2012 at 9:13 pm The Holy Spirit is NOT static! May God give you peace……….-T- This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Elizabeth Bishop says: The Rev. Phil Reinheimer says: Rector Belleville, IL Rector Bath, NC Rector Shreveport, LA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Maria Forman says: July 19, 2012 at 9:33 pm The holy spirit is definitely dancing! Thanks be to God. Comments are closed. Rector Martinsville, VA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Bruce Klaiss says: July 20, 2012 at 11:09 am The whole Diocese of Iowa rejoices with our Companion Diocese of over thirty years as we share in this moment. Bishop Mabuza invited me to share in the first ordinations of women priests in Swaziland together with a team of visitors from Iowa including the Reverend Barbara Schlachter, one of our own early Episcopal priests who was the preacher for the day. We followed this up with inviting three women priests from Swaziland to join us at Convention celebrating 30 years of women’s ordination in 2006. Last year I spent my sabbatical in the Diocese and served with the Rev Ellinah for the whole of Holy Week at the University Chaplaincy. She is a wonderful choice, and clearly being nominated at a later ballot, a modern day Ambrose of the Spirit’s making. Jeffrey Parker says: Bishop Alan Scarfe says: Cher Stone says: July 20, 2012 at 10:09 pm South Africa is once again the liberating capitol of the Spirit. Thank you! July 20, 2012 at 1:39 am The simplest and best thing to say is: Thanks be to God. August 2, 2012 at 10:13 am The Parish of Woodlands, Montclair with Yellowwood Park ( in the Diocese of Natal) recieved this news with great joy. We wish Bishop Elect Ellinah Ntombi Wamukoya Gods richest blessings and we pray for her and her family. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Marge Christie says: Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET July 19, 2012 at 6:28 pm Swaziland is in a “long term relationship” (companion diocese) with the Episcopal diocese of Iowa. We are so proud! In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET [Anglican Communion News Service] The Anglican Church of Southern Africa July 18 made history by electing the first female Anglican bishop on the continent.The Rev. Ellinah Ntombi Wamukoya, 61, became the bishop-elect of Swaziland and the first woman bishop in any of the 12 Anglican provinces in Africa. It is thought she is only the second bishop elected in a mainline church on the continent.Her election comes as the Anglican Church of Southern Africa — which also includes Angola, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa and Lesotho — commemorates 20 years since the ordination of women to the priesthood as presbyters and bishops. The 1992 synod was, coincidentally, held in Swaziland.Wamukoya was not initially a candidate, but after seven rounds of elections yielding no results, fresh nominations were invited from the Elective Assembly. She subsequently received the required two-thirds majority in both houses of laity and clergy.The assembly was described by one observer as a “particularly spirit-filled atmosphere” and there is said to be much excitement in the diocese over her election. Founded in 1968, the Diocese of Swaziland comprises of three archdeaconries: Eastern Swaziland, Southern Swaziland and Western Swaziland. Her predecessor is the Rt. Rev. Meshack Mabuza, who became bishop of Swaziland in 2002.Wamukoya is currently chaplain at the University of Swaziland and St. Michael’s High School in Manzini, Swaziland. She also serves as chief executive officer of the City Council in Manzini.The election has to be confirmed by the members of the Synod of Bishops. When that happens, Wambukoya will become the 24th non-retired female bishop of the Anglican Communion. The member Churches that have appointed or elected women bishops to date are Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia; Australia; Canada; The Episcopal Church, Cuba and now Southern Africa.As there are several other dioceses of Anglican Church of Southern Africa electing bishops before the end of the year, it is likely there will be one big consecration service for them all, early next year.Celebrations of the 20th anniversary of the ordination of women to the priesthood in Southern Africa will be held in September 2012 on the margins of the Provincial Standing Committee meeting, with the Episcopal Church’s Bishop Barbara Harris as a special guest. An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Africa, The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group July 19, 2012 at 6:17 pm Marvelous! Tom Morson says: Youth Minister Lorton, VA Featured Events Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs July 19, 2012 at 7:47 pm Wonderful news!Here in the companion diocese of Brechin (Scotland), we are all delighted. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK martha knight says: Lovette Tucker says: TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab July 20, 2012 at 9:24 am A monumental step forward. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Tags Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Press Release Service July 19, 2012 at 5:48 pm The Holy Spirit is revealing to us all, and we are listening. My heart is dancing and grateful. By ACNS staff Posted Jul 19, 2012 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH July 19, 2012 at 3:47 pm Congratulations and welcome to the community of progressive believers. We are eagerly anticipating this action in the anglican diocese of the western, developed nations of the world. Rector Pittsburgh, PA Mervyn E. Singh says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York July 19, 2012 at 8:03 pm This is wonderful news! I wish the Bishop elect the blessing of health and support for a long, effective episcopate. Curate Diocese of Nebraska Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Bill Cruse says: Hugh Magee says: People, Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Director of Music Morristown, NJ July 20, 2012 at 8:51 am We rejoice with you in this great news. Submit an Event Listing Associate Rector Columbus, GA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Knoxville, TN July 19, 2012 at 7:41 pm Blessings to Bp. -elect Wamukoya and to the Diocese of Swaziland. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY Rector Tampa, FL July 19, 2012 at 9:00 pm What a wonderful day for women and young girls who need positive role models in their lives. The Lord works in wonderful ways. Blessings to all in Africa. Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC July 19, 2012 at 9:03 pm I recall reading, when Katharine Jefferts Schori was elected as presiding bishop, that Desmond Tutu’s reaction was “Oh, goody!”. My reaction to this news is much the same. I must say that it came as a surprise, as it seems that Swaziland has had female clergy a relatively short time. But it is small surprise because, as an Iowan, I know the faith, courage and generous spirits of our good friends in the diocese of Swaziland. I wish them well as they go on from this new beginning! Course Director Jerusalem, Israel July 19, 2012 at 2:51 pm This news makes me want to dance!last_img read more

Read More »

Canada: Improvements to continuing education and long-term disability plans

first_img Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Hopkinsville, KY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Bath, NC Ecumenical & Interreligious AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Shreveport, LA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Tags Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Tampa, FL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Anglican Communion, Press Release Service Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Smithfield, NC center_img This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Martinsville, VA Canada: Improvements to continuing education and long-term disability plans Submit a Press Release Youth Minister Lorton, VA Featured Events Rector Washington, DC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Job Listing Featured Jobs & Calls An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Curate Diocese of Nebraska Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Bishop Philip Poole, chairman of the Anglican Church of Canada’s pension committee, addresses members of General Synod. Photo: Art Babych[Anglican Journal] Bishop Phillip Poole, chairman of the Anglican Church of Canada’s  pension committee, introduced resolutions on the church’s pension and continuing education plans. The five resolutions, recommended by the trustees, were previously presented to the pension committee and the Council of General Synod.“Most of the changes relate to compliance with changes in provincial pension law, and some are housekeeping details,” said Poole, of the diocese of Toronto. The plans are domiciled in Ontario. All the resolutions, A180 through A184, were carried.Resolution A180 concerns an application to register the church’s continuing education plan as a charitable organization to ensure that funds disbursed to recipients will have tax-free status.Resolution A184 involves an amendment to address the large unfunded liability in the church’s pre-2005 long-term disability plan. It allows for the purchase of an insurance product to cover the liability, and for a church administrator to work with the insurance carrier to manage claimants.Bishop Poole expressed gratitude to the trustees and to Judy Robinson, director of pensions. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI By Diana SwiftPosted Jul 8, 2013 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Albany, NY Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Canada Joint Assembly, Submit an Event Listing Rector Belleville, IL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC last_img read more

Read More »

Un grupo de Carolina del Norte explora su colaboración en…

first_imgUn grupo de Carolina del Norte explora su colaboración en Costa Rica Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Tags Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit an Event Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Featured Jobs & Calls Latin America, Province IX Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Por Lynette WilsonPosted Aug 23, 2013 Rector Collierville, TN AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Featured Events Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Martinsville, VA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Youth Minister Lorton, VA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit a Press Release Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KY An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Un grupo exploratorio de la iglesia episcopal del Santo Consolador en Burlington, Carolina del Norte, visitó la Iglesia Episcopal de Costa Rica la semana del 5 de agosto en busca de una relación de compañerismo. Aquí Tom Lambeth y Morgan Kernodle posan con alumnos del Hogar Escuela en Barrio Cuba. Foto de Lynette Wilson para ENS.[Episcopal News Service – San José, Costa Rica] Puede haber sido amor a primera vista.Un martes por la mañana de hace poco, un sacerdote, una pediatra, un juez y una maestra entraron en el Hogar Escuela que tiene la Iglesia Episcopal de Costa Rica en la sección Barrio Cuba de esta ciudad de San José para encontrarse con 160 niños, de entre seis meses y 12 años de edad, uniformados con camisas y blusas a cuadros blancos y azules y pantalones y faldas azul marino.“El programa comenzó aquí hace 50 años con 10 niños, y en cuestión de cuatro años había 40…”, explicó Héctor Monterroso, el obispo [episcopal] de Costa Rica, añadiendo que la escuela sirve fundamentalmente a hijos de madres solteras en uno de los barrios más pobres de San José, donde no es raro que haya vendedores de drogas por las esquinas.“Los niños creen que esto es normal”, afirmó.La escuela sirve como una suerte de oasis, con todas las cosas, desde un terreno de juego bajo techo —en Costa rica llueve nueve meses del año— hasta los colores con que están pintadas las paredes que alientan la tranquilidad y el aprendizaje. Al proporcionarles a los niños la mejor atención y ambiente posibles para jugar y para aprender, el personal de la escuela, que incluye a dos capellanes, espera prepararlos para un futuro más prometedor.“Apoyamos a los niños con buena educación, nutrición, tecnología y valores. Brindándoles un lugar seguro y un ambiente diferente [a los niños], tal vez podamos romper el ciclo [de la pobreza]”, expresó Monterroso.ExploraciónLa escuela de Barrio Cuba sería la primera de las dos escuelas que el grupo de la iglesia episcopal del Santo Consolador [Holy Comforter Episcopal Church] en  Burlington, Carolina del Norte, visitaría ese día. La segunda, ubicada en Heredia, una ciudad industrial densamente poblada al norte de San José, sigue el modelo de la primera y atiende a niños del Gaurarí, un área aún más pobre poblada principalmente por inmigrantes nicaragüenses.“Este es un grupo exploratorio”, dijo la Dra. Shannon McQueen, la pediatra. “Para ver qué necesidades se ajustan a nuestros talentos”.“Esperamos que [la asociación] llegue a ser diáfana”, dijo ella, añadiendo que el grupo le presentará un plan a la junta parroquial y a la iglesia y juntos decidirán el camino a seguir.En enero, el Rdo. Adam Shoemaker, el rector de la iglesia, le propuso a la junta parroquial una asociación internacional; la junta estuvo de acuerdo y el grupo pasó la semana del 5 de agosto en Costa Rica explorando una relación de compañerismo parroquial.Shoemaker sirvió como misionero del Cuerpo de Servicio de Jóvenes Adultos en el suburbio de Río de Janeiro que aparece en la película de 2002 Ciudad de Dios, antes de convertirse en un sacerdote parroquial.“Este es el fruto del programa del YASC; que ha seguido actuando en mi corazón y en mi mente desde entonces”, dijo él en una entrevista con ENS en Costa Rica.“Algunos podrían preguntar, ‘¿por qué irse tan lejos?’”, dijo Shoemaker, al tiempo de explicar que el servicio internacional “nos ayuda a valorar que somos parte de una Iglesia mayor y profundiza nuestra fe”.La misión internacional funciona, añadió, también inspira el trabajo local del Santo Consolador, el cual incluye un programa de tutoría en la Escuela Primaria [Harvey R.] Newlin, una escuela elemental de bajo rendimiento que queda cerca.En parte el deseo [de la iglesia] del Santo Consolador de asociarse con uno de los seis programas de la Iglesia en Costa Rica se inspira en la Iniciativa Galilea del obispo Michael Curry de Carolina del Norte, que reta a los miembros a salir a la comunidad y a la Comunión Anglicana, dijo Tom Lambeth, un juez que sirve en la junta parroquial y en el comité de misión y participación comunitaria de la iglesia.CompañerismoLa Diócesis de Carolina del Norte y la Iglesia Episcopal de Costa Rica han estado en una relación de compañerismo desde 1995. Un coordinador de diócesis compañera sirve en Costa Rica para facilitar la relación y ocuparse de la planificación y los preparativos de viajes, y funciona como secretario de habla inglesa del obispo y su capellán durante las visitas pastorales, dijo Clarence Fox, miembro de la iglesia episcopal de San Albano [St. Alban’s Episcopal Church] en Davidson, Carolina del Norte, quien terminó recientemente su servicio como coordinador diocesano.“El puesto es el de intermediario entre las dos diócesis, garantizando que Costa Rica entienda claramente lo que Carolina del Norte tiene en mente [y viceversa]”, dijo Fox.Un grupo exploratorio de la iglesia episcopal del Santo Consolador en Burlington, Carolina del Norte, visitó la Iglesia Episcopal de Costa Rica la semana del 5 de agosto. De izquierda a derecha, Tom Lambeth, Clarence Fox (detrás), la Dra. Shannon McQueen, Morgan Kernodle, el Rdo. Adam Shoemaker y el obispo de Costa Rica Héctor Monterroso. Foto de Lynette Wilson para ENS.De la misma manera que el grupo exploratorio está abordando su asociación, la Iglesia en Costa Rica procura equiparar sus talentos y recursos con las necesidades de una comunidad.A cada una de las 19 iglesias y misiones de la Iglesia Episcopal de Costa Rica se les insta a tener un plan basado en el triple plan estratégico de la Iglesia, que incluye expansión, educación cristiana/reflexión teológica y testimonio cristiano mediante la participación comunitaria, o la misión. Además de un plan, los sacerdotes bivocacionales deben tener un plan para financiarlo.“Discutimos diferentes puntos de interés misional y luego discernimos la que puede ajustarse a nuestra labor”,  dijo Monterroso. “No es posible cerrar los ojos cuando estamos en medio de un problema”.Hace medio siglo, la congregación de la iglesia episcopal del Buen Pastor en el centro de San José abrió los ojos a los problemas que los pobres enfrentaban en Barrio Cuba y decidió intervenir. La escuela, que desde entonces ha crecido hasta incluir su propia congregación, la iglesia episcopal de San Felipe y Santiago, funciona de 6 A.M. a 6 P.M. de lunes a viernes, para ajustarse a los horarios de los padres trabajadores. La matrícula mensual se paga en una escala proporcional que va de cero a $220. Lo que no se recauda en matrícula para llegar a los $400.000 del presupuesto de funcionamiento anual, se obtiene a través de subsidios del gobierno, subvenciones y donaciones, explicó Monterroso.“Confiamos en Dios. No contamos con los recursos para funcionar cada año, tenemos que buscar los recursos para funcionar y todos los años los encontramos”, agregó.El veinticinco por ciento de los 4,7 millones de habitantes de Costa Rica vive por debajo del nivel de la pobreza, en comparación con el 42,5 por ciento de los 5,8 millones de habitantes de la vecina Nicaragua. En promedio, un 50 por ciento de la población de América Central vive por debajo del nivel de la pobreza.A diferencia de otros países centroamericanos que le quedan al norte —El Salvador, Honduras y Guatemala— Costa Rica no está plagada por la violencia pandilleril y el tráfico de drogas no ha alcanzado niveles significativos, afirmó Monterroso.No obstante, el país no es inmune a la pobreza, las drogas y la violencia. Uno podría pasar por alto Gaurarí, si no sabe que existe. Pero detrás de un centro comercial en Heredia hay un área de casuchas y de viviendas del gobierno que albergan a un gran número de inmigrantes de la vecina Nicaragua: hay unos 400.000 nicaragüenses en Costa Rica.Clarence Fox, a la izquierda, ex coordinador de asociación diocesana, habla acerca del papel de la iglesia episcopal de San Albano, en Davidson, Carolina del Norte, en la construcción del Hogar Escuela en Heredia, mientras Tom Lambeth, el obispo Héctor Monterroso y Sandra Cardona lo escuchan. Foto de Lynette Wilson para ENS.Aprovechándose de sus éxitos en Barrio Cuba, Cristo Resucitado, una pujante congregación que se reúne en un apartamento a unos pocos kilómetros de distancia, abrió un segundo Hogar Escuela en Heredia, a principios de julio, para atender a niños y padres que viven en Gaurarí.“Esta escuela es el resultado de prestar atención a las necesidades de la comunidad y de responder como lo haría un pastor. Han participado muchísimos pastores: el que donó el terreno —y luego donó una parcela mayor—, los que diseñaron la escuela, los que ayudaron a construir y a amueblar el edificio, y a supervisar su construcción, y los que han pintado estos murales”, dijo la obispa primada Katharine Jefferts Schori, durante la inauguración de la escuela el 29 de junio. “Esta escuela está preparada para recibir muchos corderos, para alimentarlos y formarlos en cuerpo, mente y espíritu. Necesitará del continuo pastoreo de maestros y cocineros y supervisores que ayudarán a mantenerla sana y encaminada hacia los delicados pastos”.“Si esta escuela llega a ser el hogar o el albergue del que toma su nombre, llegará a la comunidad más amplia para alimentar y atender a los corderos y a las ovejas que viven en torno, incluidos algunos que nunca entrarán en este lugar. Ese pastoreo empieza con los primeros alumnos que vienen aquí…”.Durante una visita a la escuela, Monterroso explicó que el hombre a quien la Iglesia le compró el terreno, luego de ver a la Obispa Primada en la televisión durante la [ceremonia] del desbroce del terreno y de haber  adquirido un mejor entendimiento del proyecto, le ofreció a la Iglesia un parcela un poco mayor en la acera de enfrente.Algunos de los niños que asisten al Hogar Escuela provienen de Gaurarí, un área detrás de un centro comercial donde la gente ha construido casuchas de zinc. Foto de Lynette Wilson para ENS.Muchos de los inmigrantes de Nicaragua se han instalado en casuchas, dijo Sandra Cardona, directora administrativa de ambas escuelas y esposa del obispo.“Utilizamos el término ‘precario,’ para describirlas” dijo ella, en el sentido de los que viven precariamente. “Los preparamos para que salgan y busquen empleos. Les convencemos de que pueden hacer más por sí mismos y por sus hijos”.El mayor reto que enfrenta el personal tocante a la Escuela de Heredia, dijo Cardona, es cambiar la mentalidad de pobreza de la madre.“Aquí lo que hemos visto son muchas madres adolescentes, niñas criando niños, no hay oportunidades para ellos; sus madres no tuvieron oportunidades”, afirmó Carmona, añadiendo que ese es el porqué las escuelas funcionan tanto con las madres como con los hijos. “Los niños no tienen problemas, heredan los problemas”.Los niños que asisten al Hogar Escuela en Barrio Cuba tienen en su mayoría madres que trabajan, pero ese programa, admitió Cardona, ha estado funcionando por casi medio siglo. La escuela de Heredia tiene ahora más de 35 alumnos, y también funciona de 6 A.M. a 6 P.M. de lunes a viernes.Antes de la apertura de la escuela, la Iglesia, con la ayuda de la iglesia episcopal de San Albano en Davidson y otros grupos de misión, dirigía una escuela bíblica de vacaciones en un edificio contiguo a la estación de policía de Gaurarí. Con el 40 por ciento de la mano de obra provista por los grupos de misión, el proyecto escolar de $750.000 se construyó en el curso de tres años, explicó Monterroso.Relaciones sólidasEl acuerdo de compañerismo entre Costa Rica y Carolina del Norte se basa en la relación y el intercambio, dijo el obispo.La Diócesis de Carolina del Norte y la Iglesia Episcopal de Costa Rica enfocaron su relación de compañerismo de 18 años como un ejercicio de comprensión mutua. Un plan estratégico 2012-2015 aprobado por la Convención de la Diócesis de Costa Rica en 2011, compilado por el encargado de compañerismo y por un representante de la Diócesis de Carolina del Norte, evaluaba las necesidades físicas y espirituales  de cada una de las parroquias y misiones de la Iglesia en Costa Rica, y buscaba identificar las oportunidades para una asociación a largo plazo.“En la Comunión Anglicana emprendemos importantes tareas que establecen y afirman ‘vínculos afectivos’ entre diferentes localidades geográficamente distantes y culturalmente diferentes dentro de la Iglesia”, dijo Anne E. Hodges-Copple, obispa sufragánea de Carolina del Norte en un mensaje electrónico a ENS. “Tales vínculos no existen de una manera meramente teológica o histórica. Son dones celestiales que somos invitados a promover de formas reales y tangibles. Los intercambios entre nuestras dos diócesis han creado genuinas relaciones, verdadero compañerismo, auténtico diálogo entre los individuos y entre estos, las juntas parroquiales y las parroquias.“En otras palabras, estas relaciones adquirieron una naturaleza sacramental: signos externos y visibles de la gracia restauradora de Dios. Tales relaciones de compañerismo entre personas de diferentes orígenes culturales revelan que nuestra particularidad y diversidad es también parte de nuestra catolicidad”, agregó ella.“Ser ‘católico’ es reconocer que mi particularidad debe servir para edificar el todo”, afirmó.Para Hodges-Copple un “ejemplo particularmente convincente de beneficio mutuo” ha sido el empeño de mantener activas las juntas parroquiales de ambas diócesis.  “Los miembros de las juntas parroquiales que han participado en estos eventos han tenido su propio sentido de llamado y de propósito robustecido por el aprendizaje de la experiencia de otros”, dijo ella.Un mural en el salón de multiusos del Hogar Escuela en Heredia muestra a todas las grandes religiones del mundo, haciendo obvio que la escuela está a disposición de todos. Foto de Lynette Wilson para ENS.Costa Rica, al igual que el resto de América latina, es un país mayoritariamente catolicorromano, donde los laicos están acostumbrado al tipo de gobierno de estructura vertical, de manera que ha resultado útil para los laicos que se desempeñan en las juntas parroquiales aprender, de sus homólogos de Carolina del Norte, la manera que tienen éstas de funcionar, explicó Monterroso.También ha sido útil para el clero costarricense dedicar un tiempo para aprender historia de la Iglesia Episcopal y estudiar inglés en Carolina del Norte, y al clero de Carolina del Norte para aprender español en Costa Rica, añadió el obispo.Fue la búsqueda de una experiencia intercultural lo que hizo que Morgan Kernodle, maestra de sexto grado, quisiera formar parte del grupo exploratorio. Eso y el hecho de que muchos de sus alumnos son de América Latina, y cuando ella les dijo que iba a visitar Costa Rica se mostraron muy entusiasmados.“Me sentía curiosa por lo que existía afuera, más allá de [las fronteras] de EE.UU., y tan pronto como mencionaron escuelas, me sentí convencida”, dijo. “Ayuda a poner las cosas en perspectiva; los estudiantes enfrentan problemas semejantes, padres solteros, los problemas son universales”.En el transcurso de un almuerzo tarde, reflexionando sobre lo que el grupo había visto hasta ese momento, Lambeth, miembro de la junta parroquial y juez, aun pensaba en lo que había presenciado horas antes ese mismo día en Barrio Cuba.“Me enamoré de esa escuela” afirmó.– Lynette Wilson es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Rector Smithfield, NC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Bath, NC Rector Washington, DC Press Release Service Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Job Listing Rector Tampa, FL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Knoxville, TN last_img read more

Read More »

Anglican Communion Standing Committee issues report to ACC

first_img Rector Tampa, FL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Martinsville, VA Anglican Communion, Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel ACC16, Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Smithfield, NC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Collierville, TN Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Shreveport, LA Submit a Press Release The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Music Morristown, NJ Tags TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls Anglican Consultative Council Rector Washington, DC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit a Job Listing Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Posted Apr 8, 2016 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Belleville, IL [Anglican Communion News Service] The Anglican Communion Standing Committee, which met April 6-7 in Lusaka, Zambia, issued the following report to the 16th Meeting of the Anglican Consultative Council.The Standing Committee met in worship and prayer on 6-7 April at Holy Cross Cathedral in Lusaka, Zambia to effect its regular business and also prepare for the 16th meeting of the Anglican Consultative Council to follow. The Standing Committee expresses its thanks to the Province of Central Africa for its generous hospitality and welcomes the opportunity of hearing African voices on issues facing the world and the Church.The meeting opened with a review of the roles and responsibilities of the Standing Committee, which was particularly useful for the primates on the Standing Committee all of whom were newly elected at the last meeting of the Primates. Secretary General Archbishop Josiah Idowu-Fearon followed with a review of his first ten months in office emphasizing insights he has gained into Anglican ecclesiology through his extensive travels around the Communion. The Secretary General’s report was followed by a discussion of the networks of the Anglican Communion noting those that are currently still active and those that seem to have lapsed.The Standing Committee received a report from the Archbishop of Canterbury on the Primates’ gathering in January 2016 and noted the stated commitment of the Primates to ‘walk together’ despite differences of view. The Standing Committee welcomed the formation of a Task Group as recommended by the Primates to maintain conversation among them with the intention of restoration of relationship, the rebuilding of mutual trust, and healing the legacy of hurt. The Standing Committee considered the Communiqué from the Primates and affirmed the relational links between the Instruments of Communion in which each Instrument, including the Anglican Consultative Council, forms its own views and has its own responsibilities.The Standing Committee spent substantial time reviewing the programme and processes for ACC16 including a brief on its communications strategy. The roles and responsibilities of Standing Committee in the ACC meeting were clarified with specific attention to our work as table facilitators. We noted with regret that some provinces will not be attending ACC16 and that this will result in the loss of their views from our discussions. We hold in our prayers all members of the ACC who will not be with us in Lusaka. The Standing Committee urges all members of the ACC to engage openly and respectfully with each other as we explore the theme of ‘intentional discipleship in a world of differences.’In additional business, the Standing Committee: noted the accounts and approved new trustees for the Anglican Alliance; discussed processes related to the development of possible new Anglican provinces in Sudan, Chile, and Peru; considered the situation of the Church of Ceylon; reviewed the Reports and Financial Statements of the Anglican Consultative Council and of the Lambeth Conference Company; and adopted objectives for the management of the Anglican Communion Office Archives. The Chair, The Rt Revd Dr James Tengatenga, the Vice Chair, Canon Elizabeth Paver, and the following five members of the Standing Committee elected by the ACC were thanked as they complete their terms: Mrs Helen Biggin, Professor Joanildo Burity, The Rt Revd Dr Ian Douglas, The Rt Revd Dr Sarah Macneil and Mr Samuel Mukunya.Members of the Standing Committee:President: The Most Revd and Rt Hon Justin WelbyChair: The Rt Revd Dr James TengatengaVice Chair: Canon Elizabeth PaverElected by the Primates’ Meeting:The Most Revd Dr Philip FreierThe Most Revd Dr Richard ClarkeThe Most Revd Dr Mouneer Hanna Anis [not present at this meeting]The Most Revd Dr Thabo Makgoba [not present at this meeting]The Most Revd & Rt Hon Dr John HolderElected by the ACC:Mrs Helen BigginThe Rt Revd Eraste BigirimanaProfessor Joanildo BurityThe Rt Revd Dr Ian DouglasThe Rt Revd Dr Sarah MacneilMs Louisa MojelaMr Samuel Mukunya [resigned]Secretary General: The Most Revd Josiah Idowu-Fearon Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Featured Events Submit an Event Listing Rector Bath, NC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Press Release Service AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Albany, NY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Knoxville, TN Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Anglican Communion Standing Committee issues report to ACC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET last_img read more

Read More »

Rencontre du Conseil exécutif et des permanents pour contribuer à…

first_img Featured Events Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR de Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Oct 20, 2016 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Collierville, TN Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Executive Council, Press Release Service Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Belleville, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Martinsville, VA Tags The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Featured Jobs & Callscenter_img An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Les membres du Conseil exécutif de l’Église épiscopale rencontrent le 20 octobre les membres confessionnels du personnel dans la Chapelle de Notre-Seigneur-Jésus-Christ de l’Episcopal Church Center à Manhattan afin de mieux se connaître dans le cadre des initiatives de l’Église en vue d’améliorer sa culture pour qu’elle reflète mieux l’attitude aimante, libératrice et vivifiante de Jésus. Photo : Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – New Brunswick (New Jersey)] Le Conseil exécutif de l’Église épiscopale s’est rendu à New York, le premier jour de sa réunion (qui s’est tenue du 20 au 22 octobre), afin de rencontrer les permanents dans le cadre des initiatives de l’Église en vue d’améliorer sa culture pour qu’elle reflète mieux l’attitude aimante, libératrice et vivifiante de Jésus.Pour lancer le dialogue de l’après-midi, l’Évêque Primat Michael B. Curry a expliqué qu’il s’agit de « libérer cette église pour qu’elle soit un catalyseur de bien et d’amour dans le monde ».L’ensemble des permanents s’était réuni les 18 et 19 octobre pour poursuivre ses travaux sur le changement de culture entrepris depuis le printemps. Lors du dernier exercice de cette réunion, chacun des permanents s’est engagé verbalement à opérer un changement dans son comportement. L’Évêque Primat, décrivant sa réaction à l’écoute de ces engagements, confie que derrière chaque vœu, il y a un « profond espoir que nous nous rapprochions tant soit peu de ce que Dieu rêve que nous soyons ».Au cours de la séance plénière d’ouverture du Conseil le 20 octobre, l’Évêque Primat et la révérende Gay Clark Jennings ont tous deux rappelé la réunion historique du mois dernier de la Chambre des Évêques et de la Chambre des Députés qui a réuni un grand nombre de participants pour s’informer sur les travaux de changement de culture, conduits avec l’aide de Human Synergistics International. Les consultants ont été engagés à la suite d’une enquête concernant des plaintes du personnel à l’automne dernier, relatives aux pratiques professionnelles de trois cadres supérieurs du Church Center de New York. L’Évêque Primat avait déclaré à Episcopal News Service à l’époque que la décision était en grande partie fondée sur le besoin pour toute organisation confessionnelle, lors d’un changement de leadership, d’examiner sa culture.Gay Jennings a relié ces travaux aux questions auxquelles l’Église a récemment été confrontée sur la façon de changer ses structures pour mieux les adapter à ses missions. « Si nous ne prêtons pas attention à ce que nous apprenons sur la culture de l’église et nous concentrons sur son changement, afin de créer la culture du Mouvement de Jésus à travers toute l’église, nous n’opérons jamais de changement structurel significatif », explique-t-elle.Changer la culture de l’Église « libérera l’énergie et le pouvoir des épiscopaliens à tous les niveaux de ministère afin d’accomplir la mission de Dieu pour l’Église épiscopale » et, combiner la culture et l’énergie de l’Église « nous mènera à créer une structure saine, vivifiante et libératrice qui utilise au mieux nos ressources en tant que peuple de Dieu », poursuit-elle.Le révérend Michael Hunn, à gauche, l’un des trois chanoines de l’Évêque Primat en conversation avec Michael Curry, le 20 octobre, alors que le Révérend Michael Barlowe, directeur exécutif de la Convention générale et la révérende Gay Clark Jennings, Présidente de la Chambre des Députés et vice-présidente du Conseil exécutif, conversent avant que les membres du Conseil ne passent l’après-midi avec les permanents. Photo : Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceL’Évêque Primat relate l’histoire de Billy Sunday, l’évangéliste de la seconde moitié du XIXe siècle et du début du XXe qui, à la lecture du Livre de la prière commune a déclaré : « Si jamais l’Église épiscopale se réveille, faites attention ».« Mes frères et sœurs, nous sommes réveillés » a déclaré l’Évêque Primat.Également au cours de la séance plénière du matin, avant que le Conseil ne se rende à New York, les trois membres du Conseil consultatif anglican (ACC) Gay Jennings, Rosalie Ballentine, députée du Diocèse des Îles Vierges et Ian Douglas, évêque du Diocèse du Connecticut, ont présenté un rapport sur la réunion de l’ACC-16.Gay Jennings a dit que des membres de l’Église épiscopale se sont rendus à la rencontre de Lusaka (Zambie) en avril, « malgré les conjectures de certains nous dissuadant d’y aller » en raison de l’appel des Primats de la Communion en janvier, à tirer « les conséquences » pendant trois ans pour l’Église épiscopale, après qu’elle se soit prononcée en faveur de l’égalité sacramentelle du mariage. La révérende Jennings a fait remarquer que l’ACC avait refusé d’approuver ou d’imposer « les conséquences » que la réunion des primats « n’avait pas le pouvoir d’imposer ». Elle a critiqué la revendication ultérieure par l’Archevêque de Cantorbéry Justin Welby que l’ACC avait en fait approuvé « les conséquences ».« J’en suis venue, avec regret, à conclure que la politie de la Communion anglicane est en péril et que le soutien de l’Église épiscopale envers l’égalité de mariage sert d’écran de fumée à un petit nombre de primats qui veulent apparemment coopter en leur faveur, le pouvoir du Conseil consultatif anglican », conclut-elle.Rosalie Ballentine, ancien membre du Conseil dont le fils, Jabriel, siège maintenant au Conseil, a déclaré qu’elle a beaucoup appris sur la Communion au cours de la réunion, qui était la première à laquelle elle assistait et qu’elle s’est rendu compte que, plutôt que de se concentrer sur la gouvernance au sens strict, les réunions de l’ACC ont mis l’accent sur l’établissement de relations permettant d’aborder les problèmes mondiaux. Le Conseil a traité de questions telles le discipulat, la violence sexiste, le changement climatique, la violence à motivation religieuse et la sécurité alimentaire qui affectent tous les Anglicans et « à aucun moment nous ne nous sommes sentis mal accueillis », a-t-elle déclaré.Rosalie Ballentine était assise à la même table que l’Archevêque Cantorbéry et cette opportunité lui a procuré « une profonde empathie envers lui et les défis auxquels il est confronté en essayant de maintenir l’unité de la communion ». L’Archevêque, d’après elle, comprend « nos différents antécédents, les complexités de nos différents contextes et comment cela a un impact sur l’église dans le monde entier ».L’élection de l’archevêque de Hong Kong Paul Kwong en tant que président de l’ACC est inquiétante, déclare-t-elle. Relevant que certaines personnes ont déclaré que l’élection d’un primat à la présidence de l’ACC donnerait à tous les primats un moyen de communiquer avec l’ACC, Rosalie Ballentine ajoute « c’est à mon avis précisément le danger d’élire des primats ». Les primats, poursuit-elle « ont besoin d’apprendre comment nous parler à nous et non pas simplement comment parler entre eux ».Ian Douglas, que l’Évêque Primat a félicité  pour sa décision de ne pas se présenter à l’élection à la présidence de l’ACC, a dit que sa décision était fondée sur des préoccupations « institutionnelles et culturelles » concernant la manière dont sa candidature pouvait affecter l’ACC, l’Église épiscopale et « ma propre vocation personnelle », en tant qu’évêque du Connecticut.S’il s’était présenté et avait été élu, Ian Douglas savait que ses « détracteurs préparaient déjà des rapports au sujet de la dérive de l’ACC et son incapacité à être le reflet de la Communion Anglicane, si une personne de l’Église épiscopale était élue. Cela aurait porté tort à l’ACC », explique-t-il.S’il s’était présenté et n’avait pas été élu, cet échec aurait pu être pris comme preuve que l’Église épiscopale n’écoute pas les primats. En outre, ajoute-t-il, d’autres personnes l’ont aidé à voir l’impact que la présidence aurait sur sa vie personnelle et sur ses vœux en tant qu’évêque du Connecticut.À la question de la contribution triennale d’ 1,2 million de dollars de l’Église épiscopale au budget total annuel de 3 millions de dollars du Bureau de la Communion anglicane – paiement que, selon Gay Jennings, les épiscopaliens devraient continuer à verser la « joie au cœur » – Ian Douglas explique que le paiement représente environ la moitié de ce qui est demandé à l’Église. Du fait que la quote-part est basée sur le PIB du ou des pays de chaque province et du nombre de membres de la province, la contribution de l’Église épiscopale est la deuxième par ordre d’importance des provinces, après l’Église d’Angleterre. Ian Douglas fait remarquer qu’avec le taux de change actuel les dollars américains représentent davantage en Angleterre.Le trésorier Kurt Barnes a rendu compte aux membres du Conseil de la performance relative à la portion 2016 du budget triennal 2016-2018 jusqu’en août, en disant que tant les revenus que les dépenses sont conformes aux prévisions. Il a également fait remarquer que le rendement net pour l’Église sur cinq ans des 370 millions de dollars d’investissements, y compris les 110 millions de dollars investis pour le compte de différentes congrégations et institutions individuelles, est de 9 % l’an. Cette performance maintient les fonds en fiducie de l’Église épiscopale dans les premiers 20 % parmi ses homologues détenant des actifs en fiducie de plus de 50 millions de dollars. « Cette solide performance n’affaiblit nullement ma résolution mentionnée il y a quelques mois de faire en sorte d’abaisser notre taux de versement de dividendes de 5 % à 4,5 % dans les quelques années à venir », a-t-il prévenu. Il va être demandé au Conseil lors de cette réunion une révision pour l’année 2017 du budget triennal 2016-2018 afin de tenir compte des variations de revenus et dépenses depuis l’approbation par la Convention générale du budget en juillet 2015. Parmi les variations figurent un revenu diocésain plus élevé que prévu, un revenu locatif retardé pour la moitié d’un étage du Church Center et des primes d’assurance médicale supérieures aux prévisions budgétaires, a expliqué Kurt Barnes.Reste de la réunionBarry Merer, responsable des services Web et médias sociaux, près de la fenêtre, s’adresse le 20 octobre aux membres du Conseil exécutif dans une salle de conférence du Church Center alors que d’autres membres du personnel l’écoutent. Photo : Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceLe 21 octobre, le Conseil va commencer sa journée par la Sainte Eucharistie dans l’église historique Christ Church toute proche de New Brunswick puis passer le reste de la journée en réunion avec ses cinq comités. Le 22 octobre, ces comités vont chacun faire rapport à l’assemblée tout entière et lui soumettre des résolutions à étudier.La réunion se déroule à l’hôtel Heldrich  à New Brunswick (État du New Jersey), à environ une heure au sud-ouest de l’Episcopal Church Center situé dans le centre de Manhattan.Le Conseil exécutif mène à bien les programmes et les politiques adoptés par la Convention générale, conformément au Canon I.4 (1). Le Conseil se compose de 38 membres – 20 d’entre eux (quatre évêques, quatre prêtres ou diacres et 12 laïcs) sont élus par la Convention générale et 18 (un membre du clergé et un laïc) par les neuf synodes provinciaux pour des mandats de six ans – plus l’Évêque Primat et le Président de la Chambre des Députés. En outre, le vice-président de la Chambre des députés, le secrétaire, le directeur des opérations, le trésorier et le directeur financier y siègent et ont droit de parole mais n’ont pas droit de vote.– La Révérende Mary Frances Schjonberg est rédacteur et journaliste pour l’Episcopal News Service. Executive Council October 2016 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Hopkinsville, KY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Shreveport, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rencontre du Conseil exécutif et des permanents pour contribuer à « jouer un rôle de catalyseur dans le monde » Séance d’ouverture dans deux États, avec un trajet en car entre les deux Submit a Job Listing Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Washington, DC Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit a Press Release Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit an Event Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Albany, NY Rector Knoxville, TNlast_img read more

Read More »

La politique d’immigration de Donald Trump force l’Église épiscopale à…

first_img Submit a Press Release de Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Apr 4, 2017 Bien qu’auparavant scolarisée en sixième année, Ayesh, qui a fui le Gouvernorat d’Idleb en Syrie pour se rendre en Turquie, ne va pas à l’école. Photo : UNICEF/Shehzad Noorani[Episcopal News Service] En 2018, L’Episcopal Migration Ministries (EMM) va diviser par six son réseau de trente-et-un membres affiliés en raison de l’évolution de la politique des États-Unis qui va diminuer de plus de la moitié le nombre de réfugiés se réinstallant dans le pays chaque année.Ces affiliés et les diocèses de l’Église épiscopale dans lesquels ils sont situés, sont les suivants :Refugee One à Chicago dans l’llinois (Diocèse de Chicago).Lutheran Social Services of Northeast Florida à Jacksonville (Diocèse de Floride).Lutheran Social Services of North Dakota à Fargo et Lutheran Social Services of North Dakota à Grand Forks (Diocèse du Dakota du Nord).Ascentria Care Alliance à Concord dans le New Hampshire (Diocèse du New Hampshire).Ascentria Care Alliance à Westfield dans le Massachusetts (Diocèse de l’Ouest du Massachusetts).EMM ne réinstallera pas de réfugiés par l’entremise de ces affiliés pendant l’exercice fédéral 2018 (du 1er octobre 2017 au 30 septembre 2018).Les fermetures prévues sont une disposition douloureuse mais stratégiquement nécessaire, confie le chanoine E. Marquez Stevenson, directeur d’EMM, à Episcopal News Service. Qui plus est, elles arrivent à la suite de deux autres décisions récentes visant à réduire l’empreinte d’EMM, l’une directement liée à l’évolution de la politique gouvernementale concernant les réfugiés et l’autre pas.« C’est douloureux, c’est horrible mais nous espérons – nous prions – que nous ayons pris les bonnes décisions pour la santé du réseau global et pour le bien-être des réfugiés », poursuit-il. « C’est notre souci numéro un ».À la suite des décrets du président Donald Trump sur l’immigration qui réduisent de plus de la moitié le nombre de réfugiés pouvant être réinstallés chaque année dans le pays, le département d’État des États-Unis a émis une directive à l’intention des organismes de réinstallation annonçant au maximum 50 000 admissions de réfugiés au cours du prochain exercice. Le plus récent des deux décrets de Donald Trump se trouve ici.Mark Stevenson explique qu’EMM et les huit autres organismes de réinstallation qui travaillent sous contrat fédéral américain pour réinstaller des réfugiés « étudient la façon de se structurer pour avoir la taille qui convient pour l’exercice 2018 ».Les autres organismes de réinstallation sont Church World Service, Ethiopian Community Development Council, HIAS (auparavant connu sous le nom de Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society), International Rescue Committee, Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Service, U.S. Committee for Refugees and Immigrants, U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ Migration and Refugee Services et World Relief (selon le droit fédéral, les réfugiés ne peuvent entrer aux États-Unis que sous les auspices d’un de ces organismes).« Nous étudions également comment nous structurer pour rester en bonne santé pour le reste de cette année car une grande partie du financement qui provient du gouvernement fédéral est calculé sur le nombre de réfugiés arrivant aux États-Unis », ajoute-t-il.Ainsi, lorsque les réfugiés ne peuvent pas entrer aux États-Unis, les organismes de réinstallation comme EMM reçoivent beaucoup moins d’argent fédéral que prévu. Cette réduction rend également plus difficile la prestation de services continus aux réfugiés déjà réinstallés aux États-Unis.Les administrateurs de chacun des neuf organismes sont forcés de faire des choix pour préserver l’intégrité du réseau d’organismes et d’affiliés de la meilleure manière pour les réfugiés.« Il est important que nous ayons un système permettant de réinstaller les réfugiés là où ils sont en sécurité, où c’est abordable, où l’occasion leur est donnée de prospérer en tant que nouveaux Américains », explique Mark Stevenson.En gardant ceci à l’esprit, dit-il, chaque organisme fait des choix en fonction de là où il opère à présent, où il opère en partenariat avec d’autres organismes et où, compte tenu des nationalités prévues des réfugiés futurs, d’anciens réfugiés ont formé des communautés qui peuvent aider les nouveaux venus.« Nous ne voulons pas abandonner une communauté complètement à son sort », poursuit Mark Stevenson.Le chanoine E. Mark Stevenson et le personnel national d’Episcopal Migration Ministries se sont retrouvés lors d’une retraite à l’Episcopal Church Center de New York alors qu’EMM et les huit autres organismes de réinstallation des États-Unis étaient confrontés à des réductions budgétaires en raison de la politique des États-Unis en matière d’admission de réfugiés. Photo : EMM via FacebookPériode inquiétante pour la réinstallation des réfugiésLes dernières sept semaines et demie ont été difficiles et imprévisibles pour les neuf organismes de réinstallation.Le 27 janvier, le décret initial de Donald Trump a suspendu l’entrée des réfugiés aux États-Unis pour au moins 120 jours. Le décret indiquait également que lorsque l’administration lèverait l’interdiction, d’autres restrictions seraient imposées aux réfugiés potentiels de sept pays à majorité musulmane. Donald Trump a en outre déclaré qu’une fois l’interdiction levée, il n’autoriserait que 50 000 réfugiés à entrer aux États-Unis au lieu des 110 000 prévus pour l’exercice. Selon le droit fédéral, le président décide chaque année du nombre maximum de réfugiés qui seront autorisés à se réinstaller aux États-Unis. Les neuf organismes avaient tous adaptés leurs personnel et bureaux pour réinstaller un bien plus grand nombre de réfugiés.Le 6 février, James Robart, juge de District des États-Unis à Seattle a temporairement bloqué la mesure prise par Donald Trump, laissant le Programme d’admission des réfugiés du Département d’État dans l’incertitude. Donald Trump a émis son deuxième décret présidentiel le 6 mars, retirant l’Irak de la liste des sept pays et reformulant son premier décret pour tenter d’éviter de nouvelles allégations de violation de la garantie de liberté religieuse qui figure dans la Constitution des États-Unis. Le nouveau décret maintient la réduction du nombre de réfugiés qui peuvent entrer aux États-Unis une fois que l’activité reprend.Le décret du 6 mars est en suspens tandis que les juges de district fédéraux examinent les contestations. Le 29 mars, Derrick Watson, juge de district des États-Unis à Hawaï a bloqué le décret présidentiel pour une période plus longue. Derrick Watson avait auparavant imposé un jugement provisoire. La décision reste en vigueur jusqu’à ce que Derrick Watson en décide autrement, y compris au cours d’une procédure en appel déposée le jour suivant par l’administration Trump.Le gouvernement a également fait appel de la décision d’un juge fédéral du Maryland qui a bloqué le décret. Et James Robart, le juge de district fédéral de l’État de Washington, n’a pas encore statué sur les contestations du deuxième décret présidentiel.Le terme « réfugié » a un sens juridique spécifique. Le Haut Commissariat des Nations Unies pour les réfugiés (UNHCR) désigne une personne en tant que « réfugiée » si elle fuit la persécution, la guerre ou la violence. Ces personnes présentent une demande de désignation et sont considérées de façon distincte des immigrés. Elles obtiennent la désignation de réfugiées une fois que l’UNHCR a vérifié leur demande. Episcopal Migration Ministries réinstalle les réfugiés qui ont reçu la désignation de l’ONU, sont envoyés par l’ONU aux États-Unis et subissent un processus de vérification des États-Unis.L’impact du décret présidentiel sur les résultats d’EMM est particulièrement lourd car EMM est un ministère unique de l’Église épiscopale, tant sur le plan structurel que fiscal. Tout en n’étant pas constitué en société séparée comme l’est Episcopal Relief & Development, EMM reçoit très peu d’argent du budget général de l’église, recevant au lieu de cela 99,5 % de son financement du gouvernement fédéral. Son bureau principal est sis au sein de l’Episcopal Church Center à New York.Mark Stevenson indique que 90 % de l’argent du contrat va directement à la réinstallation des réfugiés. EMM retient environ 2 millions de dollars pour ses coûts administratifs, y compris tous les salaires du personnel national. Tout argent inutilisé est reversé au gouvernement.Les affiliés reçoivent de l’argent des contrats fédéraux par l’intermédiaire d’EMM et sont ainsi confrontés à d’importantes réductions budgétaires lorsqu’aucun réfugié n’entre dans le pays. Le réseau d’EMM est une combinaison de trois types d’affiliés. Deux sont essentiellement des succursales d’EMM. Les autres sont des structures indépendantes qui travaillent uniquement avec EMM ou avec EMM et Church World Service et/ou Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Service.Les affiliés utilisent des réserves de trésorerie, des collectes de fonds et tout appui qu’EMM peut leur donner pour payer leurs salariés et couvrir les loyers et autres charges d’exploitation. Le Conseil exécutif de l’Église est convenu en février de donner à EMM 500 000 dollars pour l’aider pour l’exercice 2017. L’organisme lui-même a récemment annoncé une campagne de collecte de fonds pour combler l’écart de financement.Au cours de l’exercice 2016, soit du 1er octobre 2015 au 30 septembre 2016, EMM a réinstallé aux États-Unis 5 762 réfugiés provenant de 35 pays, notamment de la République démocratique du Congo, de la Birmanie, de l’Afghanistan et de la Syrie. Pour l’exercice en cours, EMM a déjà accueilli 2 766 réfugiés et avait prévu de réinstaller 6 175 personnes jusqu’à ce que Donald Trump signe son décret le 27 janvier. Au total, chacun des neuf organismes a déjà réinstallé environ 38 000 réfugiés pour l’exercice en cours, explique Mark Stevenson.Depuis le changement de politique de l’administration Trump, EMM a réduit son personnel national de base de 22 % du fait de la réduction du financement fédéral. EMM a annoncé en février qu’il fermerait le bureau qu’il avait à Miami depuis plus de 30 ans, non pas en raison des décisions de l’administration Trump mais du fait des changements décidés par l’ancien Président Barack Obama en ce qui concerne la politique des États-Unis vis-à-vis des migrants cubains.La division par six du réseau d’affiliés et la fermeture du bureau de Miami représentent une réduction de 23 % du réseau, poursuit Mark Stevenson. « Nous espérons que ce sera suffisant », ajoute-t-il.Certains des neuf autres organismes de réinstallation ont déjà annoncé leurs décisions. World Relief a déclaré à la mi-février qu’il  lui faudrait licencier plus de 140 membres de son personnel et fermer ses bureaux de Boise (État de l’Idaho), Columbus (État de l’Ohio), Miami, Nashville (État du Tennessee) et Glen Burnie (État du Maryland).Church World Service a lancé une campagne de collecte de fonds d’un million de dollars.L’autre réalité, explique Mark Stevenson, est que le nombre réduit de réfugiés et les décisions que les organismes doivent prendre vont nuire à l’économie des villes des affiliés. Les propriétaires qui louent aux réfugiés, les employeurs qui les embauchent et les professeurs de langue, le personnel médical, les employés des écoles qui les aident à s’intégrer dans la société américaine vont perdre de l’argent ou des emplois, prédit Mark Stevenson.« Nous prenons les meilleures décisions stratégiques que nous pouvons en fonction des informations dont nous disposons », conclut-il. « Ainsi, compte tenu des informations que nous avons maintenant et en partant de l’hypothèse que les neuf organismes de réinstallation continuent tous de travailler, nous croyons que cet ajustement de la taille de notre réseau nous positionnera correctement et nous permettra d’être un réseau sain de réinstallation des réfugiés lorsque prend fin la suspension et pour l’exercice 2018 ».Entretemps, Rebecca Linder Blachly, directrice des relations avec le gouvernement de l’Église épiscopale a déclaré à ENS que son bureau continuerait à aider ceux de l’administration qui décideront si l’interdiction peut être levée après 120 jours à « faire confiance au bon processus que nous avons mis en place » pour la réinstallation des réfugiés.Le  communiqué de presse officiel concernant la réduction se trouve ici.– La révérende Mary Frances Schjonberg est rédacteur et journaliste pour l’Episcopal News Service. Director of Music Morristown, NJ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Collierville, TN Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Bath, NC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit an Event Listing Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Smithfield, NC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Course Director Jerusalem, Israel La politique d’immigration de Donald Trump force l’Église épiscopale à réduire son réseau de réinstallation des réfugiés Une démarche « stratégique » destinée à préserver la solidité d’Episcopal Migration Ministries, selon son directeur Rector Shreveport, LA Refugee Ban, Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Donald Trump, Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit a Job Listing Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Albany, NY Tags Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Featured Events Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Refugees Migration & Resettlement Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Washington, DC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Faith & Politics, This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Advocacy Peace & Justice, Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID last_img read more

Read More »