Sunday Blog: Doing the little things well

first_imgby Tracy McCue, Sumner Newscow — There are only about three vehicles, maybe two, that stick out in Wellington as much as Kenny Adam’s old yellow GMC Sierra pickup.You know the kind of vehicle that marks a person from a mile away. I always wondered if Kenny could have bought himself a better pickup. It probably never interested him.I know one thing, Kenny wouldn’t have wanted me to write this column today. He was uncomfortable with the limelight and the massive amount of attention he has been receiving on social media sites such as Facebook.But, for me, mourning is about us. It is our way of coping with a loss of a friend – so we can move on to better things. So I’m writing this Sunday Blog for myself. My best experience with Kenny probably occurred in the last five years of his life. I knew him since moving to Wellington, but not as well as lately. He was my first “Shadow” – a mysterious anonymous yearly football picker I had when picking the various high school, college and pro games in the Wellington Daily News. It was one of the few features that didn’t transfer well over to the internet so I dropped it.I also enjoyed going through old WDN archives at the Wellington Public Library and discovered he was the sports editor in the early 1970s. His columns made me laugh. His record keeping was much better than my own and I discovered a list of football records that may or may not be the same source that I use today to record the latest passing or rushing records of a Crusader player.And in my early years of working at the paper, I heard all the “Kenny” stories from the longtime WDN employees working there at the time: Alda Boyd, Linda Yates, Bill Newlin, Terry Craig, Jackson Mitchell and others.But it wasn’t until the last five years that I really got to know him, and it was through the World Wide Web.About once a week, sometimes on Sunday, sometimes on midweek, he would send me an E-mail called “BS” or “10 things.” He started the ritual. I think it was to quell his inner journalism that some of us are inflicted with.He would send me random and short comments on the various issues of the day – mostly sports and small-town politics. Sometimes he would have a comment that was an impetus for one of my columns. I always felt my responses to him were some of my best writings. I felt free from the shackles of writing publicly – knowing my comments wouldn’t be distributed to the masses.One of his last series of e-mails we exchanged was a discussion on why Catholics (his faith) are such good football players. I told him I did not know. I’m a Lutheran and we don’t have that many good football players. That led into a discussion about religion which led me to Google. I learned more about my faith just because of him.I loved getting an e-mail from Kenny. It will be the thing I’ll miss the most.He was always a regular participant at Crusader Club meetings on Mondays. I think he might have died broke, because he was always telling me how lousy he was doing in his Fantasy Football league. He had a knack of drafting and starting players who would get injured or were thrown in jail. I tried to base my fantasy team drafts on the players he didn’t pick.He was the first person to start bringing Keith Finley, Wellington High School’s most devoted fan, to the weekly luncheons. I’m pretty sure I would have never come up with such a connection.He was also my stat guy, although he demanded to never give him credit. There’s a reason why the Wellington girls basketball team had better stats than all the rest. It sure wasn’t because of me. In the final year, I had him start taking stats for football. I wish I had thought of it sooner.I guess I could get into the other things that made him so great – his love for people, his love for sports, his service to the community, his military service, his service to the railroad, and so on. But this is just a story about how he affected me.In the end, it’s the little things that matter the most. Kenny, obviously, did the little things very well.Follow us on Twitter. Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comments (11) Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings Sort by: Date Rating Last Activity Loading comments… You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. +32 Vote up Vote down Guest · 288 weeks ago Thanks, Cueball. What a perfect tribute to Kenny and the type of genuine, humble person he was. Report Reply 0 replies · active 288 weeks ago +24 Vote up Vote down Zoglmann · 288 weeks ago Thanks for the article, I will miss my friend very much. John Zoglmann By the way, the trucks name was “Uncle Ray” because Kenny bought the truck from Ray Jones and everybody called Ray Jones Uncle Ray. Report Reply 0 replies · active 288 weeks ago +31 Vote up Vote down resident2014 85p · 288 weeks ago Nice article Cueball. I didn’t know Kenny other than by sight, but I do know other members of his family (daughter Mandy) who are a testament to his character. A great home-town family of Wellington, Kansas. May they find comfort in these days following his passing with loving memories of a wonderful man, father and friend. Report Reply 0 replies · active 288 weeks ago +21 Vote up Vote down Jack Crossman · 288 weeks ago I used to go fishing with Kenny and Steve Lansden at Lake Manor. We took a six pack of beer, never really caring to catch anything, we would just talk about anything and everything. It was kind of like therapy. He was one of my favorites. When I learned of his death, I felt this horrible pit in ny stomach. He will be missed by so many people. Earth lost, Heaven gained Report Reply 0 replies · active 288 weeks ago +9 Vote up Vote down Proudmama9 · 288 weeks ago Great tribute to a great man who will be remembered by all Report Reply 0 replies · active 288 weeks ago +11 Vote up Vote down Pat Zeka · 288 weeks ago You are so right. The things we do for a family at times like this are about us. We feel so helpless for those we love. Great article. Thanks for sharing it. His legacy will carry on through his family because he is partly who he was because of them. Report Reply 0 replies · active 288 weeks ago +10 Vote up Vote down Perry Wiley · 288 weeks ago Well, Tracy, you shine a little brighter because of your Kenny article. We need to ‘stop and smell the roses’ while they are still with us. I am going to make a special effort to do that. Have a great day. Perry Report Reply 0 replies · active 288 weeks ago +6 Vote up Vote down Elizabeth Shimer · 288 weeks ago Wonderful tribute to a wonderful man and family. Thank you, Tracy, for voicing what we all feel. Report Reply 0 replies · active 288 weeks ago +3 Vote up Vote down Mike Gracy · 288 weeks ago Nice and healing tribute, Tracy. Before he acquired Uncle Ray, he drove a red Chevy Pickup. He drove it out to my dad’s to have me weld up his broken frame!!! He drove it several years before he acquired another Chevy, ole blue. LOL Being around Kenny was like Therapy it just seemed as if there was no chaos in the world. Just Peace and Harmony, it will take a while for me to go thru this grieving process. It will get better. However I will never forget my friend or do I want to. His spirit will live on in Crusader Country!!! Report Reply 0 replies · active 288 weeks ago +1 Vote up Vote down Gunny · 288 weeks ago Semper Fi Report Reply 0 replies · active 288 weeks ago 12Next » Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. 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