Kenya Airways Limited (KQ.ke) 2003 Annual Report

first_imgKenya Airways Limited (KQ.ke) listed on the Nairobi Securities Exchange under the Transport sector has released it’s 2003 annual report.For more information about Kenya Airways Limited (KQ.ke) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Kenya Airways Limited (KQ.ke) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Kenya Airways Limited (KQ.ke)  2003 annual report.Company ProfileKenya Airways Limited is the flag carrier airline of Kenya operating domestic, regional and international flights to destinations in Africa, the Middle East, Asia and Europe. The company was founded in 1977 after the dissolution of East African Airways and was wholly-owned by the government of Kenya until 1995 after which it was privatised. Kenya Airways is a public-private partnership where the largest shareholder is the government of Kenya (48.9%). Kenya Airways wholly-owns Jambojet, a low-cost carrier which was created in 2013; and African Cargo Handling Limited. Companies partly owned by Kenya Airways include Kenya Airfreight Handling Limited (51%) which handles perishable goods cargo; and Precision Air (41.23%) which is a Tanzanian carrier operation. Kenya Airways head office is in Nairobi, Kenya with its main operations based in Jomo Kenyatta International Airport. Kenya Airways Limited is listed on the Nairobi Securities Exchangelast_img read more

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‘Cathedral of the Confederacy’ reckons with its history and charts…

first_img‘Cathedral of the Confederacy’ reckons with its history and charts future TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Belleville, IL The Rev. D F Lindstrom says: Tags June 19, 2017 at 4:35 pm 1. Bravo for the people of St Paul’s, Richmond, VA. The study of their parish history empowers reconciliation, their own and that of others.2. Every parish needs to find in its history the path to reconciliation. In the history of every parish is evidence of selfish individual and collective behavior and decisions which contradict the gospel, and build walls between people. Submit an Event Listing June 20, 2017 at 2:57 pm The one thing the Episcopal Church can’t change is its absence in the Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s. The Methodists, Catholics, Lutherans and a few others were there, but the Episcopal Church was wrapped in its exclusionary posture and stay out of it. God did not send Jesus to change history, He sent Jesus to redeem history. “Those who forget history are doomed to repeat it.” Pjcabbiness says: Racial Justice & Reconciliation Alda Morgan says: Doug Desper says: Bruce Garner says: Submit a Press Release By Heather Beasley DoylePosted Jun 19, 2017 Rector Tampa, FL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem June 19, 2017 at 4:38 pm I am full of admiration for St Paul’s move towards addressing historical injustices to assist in present day reconciliation and to start the journey to a realistic ‘one-in-Christ’ tomorrow. We need to do more in Aotearoa/NZ to follow their example. Featured Jobs & Calls June 19, 2017 at 5:00 pm What seems to be lost in all of this is that History is important. We don’t need to be erasing it, we need to learn from it! If we destroy all of the symbols of periods of history we do not like, what have we accomplished? Nothing except a little misguided “feel good” for those in favor of the destruction of the symbols. The same symbols that people want to destroy provide us with a chance to explain how we have resolved those issues, grown as a Church and as churchmen, and understand and respect the journeys of those who lived though those times struggled with their own faith. What can be wrong with that? Have we not learned from the Crusades, the Inquisition, the Holocaust, and from the Civil Rights Movement? Should we destroy the Holocaust Museum, etc.. I hope not. Let us not be so heavenly minded (???) that we are no earthly good! (Thanks C.K. Chesterton) June 20, 2017 at 12:49 pm They are not destroying those symbols; as the article mentioned, they have been set aside for a historical exhibit either at the church, outside of the holy space, or a traveling one. It seems that there move is to take these symbols that they have discerned are no longer a part of their theological life out of their theological space, and putting them into a historical space. So what is your problem with that? Sanctuaries are not museums (at least we hope they are not), and it seems like they are creating historical understanding, not subtracting from it.But, you raise a good idea, which is, perhaps we should have more, and more robust, civil war museums as a place to put these kinds of monuments and symbols that not longer seem appropriate in our active political and religious spaces. June 19, 2017 at 4:29 pm Historical “censorship” and revisionism as demonstrated above, is intellectually dishonest, spiritually counterfeit and an anathema to freedom. Actions like these, as innocuous as they appear, are small steps on the path to totalitarianism. Donald M Stewart, Jr. says: Dr Vladimir Pleshakov says: F William Thewalt says: June 20, 2017 at 9:27 am I applaud the people of St. Paul’s for engaging in this hard work. They are dealing with their own history directly, and no matter how they resolve it, these conversations and actions are where Christian ethics and our Baptismal Covenant touch real life. We who are not members of St. Paul’s owe them our prayers, not our criticism. We should not second guess them or their prayerful process. They are doing what they can in the place they live and in the property they steward. What are the rest of us doing in the church we attend, and the properties we steward? June 21, 2017 at 8:49 pm Two Things: I am puzzled by Dr. Flint’s statement that the Episcopal Church did not participate in the Civil Rights movement. I was involved, as were many of my Episcopal friends and colleagues. Moreover, my diocese (The Diocese of Pennsylvania) was deeply involved in it, both pro and con. On what basis, Dr. Flint, do you make that statement?Secondly, I am torn by the passion to remove the signs of our previous mistakes and –yes–unfaithfulness. But the issues that erupted in the Civil War and Reconstruction were much more complex than most of us know. The tensions between North and South (with slavery in the middle, but far from the whole story) were a major political, economic, and cultural reality of our pre-war history and much of it was unresolved by the war. To do this reconciliation properly, the churches in the North, as well as the South, need to make the same efforts to study and understand its role in that complex history. The “virtue” of the North and the “evil” of the South is nonsense. In different ways, both areas were and are complicit in the tragedy of slavery and racism. I truly believe that we won’t be able to achieve the reconciliation we all want without mutual confession and effort to listen and resolve our part in this tragedy. John B Hills says: Bruce Garner says: Fr. Eric Holloway says: Rector Knoxville, TN An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Dr. William A. Flint, MDiv, PhD says: Martha Richards says: June 22, 2017 at 11:53 am My experience was in the South. I stand by what I said. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL June 21, 2017 at 11:58 pm The Episcopal Church that I attend hosted a showing of the documentary 13th which shows the criminalization of African Americans and the US prison boom. It is a very touching documentary and I was surprised to learn that much injustice continues to this day via legal means.History as taught in school is not entirely accurate and some sort of revision is definitely needed. In every age, most people conducted their lives based on religious teachings and prevailing moral / ethical values. However, in hindsight, certain activities that led to the Stolen Generations in Australia or Britain’s Lost Children were neither moral nor ethical even then. Much psychological, emotional and mental damage must have been done to the children and their family. There are many such examples. It is commendable that some of the governments and organizations that participated in these programs are offering apology and providing some compensation. June 20, 2017 at 10:39 pm See above. And symbolism that offends is symbolism that offends whether it is the swastika or the battle flag of the Confederacy. If you read carefully, I did not make the comparison you suggest. I did compare symbols. I stand by that comparison. The swastika continues to offend our Jewish sisters and brothers just as much as the Confederate Battle Flag offends our African-American sisters and brothers. Nellwyn Beamon says: Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY David Jameson says: June 19, 2017 at 7:01 pm The confederacy is a part of our history. It is wrong to glorify it, but I think we need to remember it so that we don’t let this happen again. Sweeping things under the rug don’t make them go away, compassion and justice keep them from happening again. I was born and raised in Miami. My family lived in Key West and had slaves and freed them but still provided for them as long as they lived. It is our history, we can’t make it go away – we need to remember. June 23, 2017 at 9:17 am The rewriting of history occurred after the Civil War in which the South and its brutal economic policies were normalized. This rewriting of history then only continued the unofficial slave economy with Jim Crow and other means to subjugate a people. Sanitizing the Civil War by making it a war for “states rights” is also a rewrite. This version of history is what we Southerners grew up hearing and believing. It is time–now 150 years later–to see what the war really was. I don’t consider any of this a rewrite. It is a making right. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Advocacy Peace & Justice, Peter M Antoci says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Hopkinsville, KY Joel Watson says: July 5, 2017 at 12:58 pm Let’s remove all crosses which have been so opprmessive to non christians for 2000 years. Oh, also, remove all baptismal, communicate, confirmation, burial records of those who oppress[ed] others. Oh, and all rich people, remembering the teaching of Jesus, “Woe to you rich.” Excuse me, I have a splinter in my eye. October 28, 2017 at 12:56 pm History is filled with unpleasant, cruel facts. Eliminating them from our consciousness is, in a sense, re-writing history, sanitizing it for our comfort, and escaping from uncomfortable reality.Book-burning comes to mind. When knowledge is replaced by blissful ignorance, dictatorship is not far off. It has happened before: Stalin re-wrote history for the sake of creating his utopian paradise. We know what ensued.A blissfully ignorant insect-like society enables a dictator to force on us a new type of slavery.Wisdom, bred from knowledge, is a better choice than comfortable ignorance of a disturbing e past.Let us strike a wise balance that would enable us to see the good and praise it, and to see the evil and condemn it. We definitely should repair all damage done. Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Dr. William A. Flint, MDiv, PhD says: center_img Joel Watson says: Featured Events In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 June 19, 2017 at 9:54 pm My late grandfather, born in 1863, and reared by a negro “Mammy” who was first a slave and later a freed woman who worked for the family until near her death, was “unreconstructed” and wrong. It’s time to recognize the Confederacy was composed of many brave, but foolhardy people who were wrong in their political, theological, economic beliefs, and just about everything regarding racial policy of the period. We must move on and leave them to history, not as heroes, but as representatives of a wrong and failed cause. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS June 20, 2017 at 9:56 am If anyone is really interested in truth then I suggest reading a newly published work by the Rev. R. David Cox entitled The Religious Life of Robert E. Lee (available on Amazon). David poured much effort into research of original sources and has a wealth of good reading in his 336 pages. It and other such researched works will challrnge the oversimplified notion of Union virtue versus Southern bigotry. The Civil War is over. No one reading these kinds of news articles ever owned a slave nor have any of us been a slave. The constant dredging up of an aggrieved status or claiming a more enlihhtened status must end. In my opinion the people of those old times were people of their day. They should be remembered for their more noble and sacrificial acts. Take the Confederate decor to a history room. Study virtues. Study the impossibly complex choices that had to be made. Ponder all the while how we will be judged as people of our time. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Fr. Eric Holloway says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Hugh Hansen, Ph.D. says: Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Albany, NY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group June 20, 2017 at 3:02 pm If you haven’t noticed, the progressives are the new Communist. Rector Smithfield, NC Gordon Irwin says: AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Owen Hoskin says: Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Dr. William A. Flint, MDiv, PhD says: Press Release Service June 20, 2017 at 8:35 pm For the Church yesterday was about removing “offensive” Flags; today it is about removing “offensive” Monuments and Plaques; tomorrow it will be remove any reference to anyone who was remotely associated with the Confederacy because it is “offensive”. In a few decades future generations will know nothing about the “Cathedral of the Confederacy” because all traces of it will be gone and it will be seen as just another church….. Comments (27) Rector Pittsburgh, PA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Jawaharlal Prasad says: Rector Martinsville, VA June 19, 2017 at 9:17 pm Political correctness has gone too far when it results in the re-writing of history. It’s our past and we all live with it. The USSR was the last regime in my lifetime to attempt to re-write history. I am saddened the U. S. is going that way. July 5, 2017 at 12:59 pm Let’s remove all crosses which have been so oppressive to non-christians for 2000 years. Oh, also, remove all baptismal, communicant, confirmation, burial records of those who oppress[ed] others. Oh, and all rich people, remembering the teaching of Jesus, “Woe to you rich.” Excuse me, I have a splinter in my eye. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Bruce Garner says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel June 20, 2017 at 10:36 pm How is it “re-writing history” to put events in their correct and proper perspective? It is truly hypocritical of us white folks to claim it is history when symbols clearly offend those African-Americans who sometimes even share the church pews with us. What I see is not honoring history, it is clearly making an idol of a past that ended over 150 years ago…..yet whose influence has been romanticized to the point that it injures other human beings and perpetuates a system that should have disappeared long, long, ago. Rector Bath, NC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Richmond, Virginia, has historically been known as the Cathedral of the Confederacy. Richmond was the capital of the Confederacy during the American Civil War. Photo: Courtesy of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church.[Episcopal News Service – Richmond, Virginia] Looking around the sanctuary of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church here nothing suggests an altered space. Enough plaques, stained-glass windows, wall sconces and other adornments remain that the sanctuary is anything but bare. Its columns, deep-red pew cushions and the Tiffany Last Supper mosaic above the altar offer much for the eye to behold. And although St. Paul’s has long been known as the Cathedral of the Confederacy, the space feels cozier than a cathedral. The ceiling and walls hug close. When congregants huddle near the altar for a ceramic-cup and rustic-bread communion at the 9 a.m. service, it feels as right as the church’s later, more staid liturgy.But when Linda Armstrong, who chairs St. Paul’s History and Reconciliation Initiative, pointed to the three spots where plaques used to be – two in the sanctuary and one in the narthex – on a Saturday in late April, the emptiness left by a Confederate past becomes apparent; each a blank spot amidst the visual richness, awaiting its fate.St. Paul’s Rector the Rev. Wallace Adams-Riley, left, with Barbara Holley, a member of the History and Reconciliation Initiative’s steering committee and its Memorials Working Group. Photo: Heather Beasley DoyleThe History and Reconciliation Initiative germinated in the wake of shooter Dylann Roof’s racially motivated attack on Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, South Carolina. On a Sunday soon after the June 17, 2015, massacre, the Rev. Wallace Adams-Riley, St. Paul’s rector, asked in a sermon, “What if in this, the last summer of the sesquicentennial of the American Civil War, we begin a conversation here at St. Paul’s about the Confederate symbols in our worship space?”That question could not have come from just any pulpit. And coming from where Adams-Riley stood, in the sanctuary of the Cathedral of the Confederacy, it made waves. “I thought it was very important that it be done with a tone of seriousness and invitation, to invite our people to lean into this moment in a discerning way,” said Adams-Riley. “It quickly became clear to me that there was some anxiety.”Richmond was the capitol of the Confederacy during the American Civil War; Confederate General Robert E. Lee and Jefferson Davis, president of the Confederate States of America, worshipped at St. Paul’s during the war. Davis was a member of the church. Their pews still bear plaques attesting to their affiliation with the church, and stained-glass windows dedicated to them allow light into the sanctuary. In the 1890s, when it became popular to memorialize family members with sanctuary wall plaques, several sprung up in St. Paul’s honoring Confederate soldiers, some decorated with Confederate battle flags. Additional battle flags had been embroidered into the kneelers by the altar.Adams-Riley’s question called for parishioners to pay attention. Small and spread out, the battle flags were hidden in plain sight; many people had never even noticed them. “I’d been here for 45 years and had never read the plaques,” said St. Paul’s member Lee Switz, who chairs the History and Reconciliation Initiative’s Memorial Working Group.A plaque honoring Jefferson Davis, the president of the Confederacy, is one of the items St. Paul’s removed from its walls. Photo: Courtesy of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church.Now those Confederate battle flags are gone, removed after a November 2015 vestry vote, a decision that followed several tabled discussions on the topic. At the same time, the vestry also voted only to keep Confederate-related memorials without the battle flag, including plaques paid for by the families of congregants who fought in the Civil War. Moreover, the governing body established the History and Reconciliation Initiative, appointing vestry member Armstrong as chair. She has since spearheaded the parish’s deep dive into its history and its relationship with race since its 1845 founding. The History and Reconciliation Initiative has laid out a four-year plan to be completed in 2020, when the church marks its 175th anniversary.In parsing out what to leave in the sanctuary and what to remove, “we have really considered those families,” said Armstrong. In looking at a plaque, she remembered that “this was a human being who was loved by his family; it’s the humanity of it.” By contrast, the battle flag communicates “I believe this is right, and I’m willing to kill you for it, too.” Some flags simply unscrewed from the plaques to which they were affixed. The removed items remain in a vault at the church until their fate, whether becoming part of an exhibit somewhere in the church or a traveling educational display, is determined.In establishing the History and Reconciliation Initiative, St. Paul’s committed to push its parish conversation beyond the Confederate flag, beyond “Confederate iconography” to what Confederate symbols fundamentally evoke: a national history with thick scars around race. They would look at these scars and at their own part in staunchly defending an economic system based on the subjugation of African-Americans. In fact, the parish took its efforts a step beyond, to racial reconciliation, an attempt to figure out the church’s role in perpetuating racism, recognizing that role, and moving forward with those insights in a way that heals and repairs. “It’s doing some interior work so that we can move out into the world in ways that would not have been possible without that,” Adams-Riley said. “Isn’t that [also] true on an individual level?” And while Adams-Riley’s June 2015 sermon triggered anxiety, “It was also clear to me that there was great excitement and hope – and possibility,” he said.St. Paul’s began by hosting two “Prayerful Conversations” in the summer of 2015, and hired an outside consultant to facilitate the events. Of the parish’s 300-400 active members (on average, 200 show up for Sunday services), 100 turned out for those initial events. Adams-Riley and Armstrong agree that hiring a consultant played a crucial role in setting a relaxed tone that invited people to share deeply. The discussions were frank, sometimes emotional, and condoned conversations about race at St. Paul’s. From there, “we didn’t talk about it officially for a couple of months, because it was just too hot,” Associate Rector the Rev. Molly Bosscher said.Christopher Graham, left, with St. Paul’s Episcopal Church Associate Rector the Rev. Molly Bosscher. Graham chairs the History Working Group of St. Paul’s History and Reconciliation Initiative. Photo: Heather Beasley DoyleBosscher underscored the interpersonal complexities of a process that aims to give St. Paul’s a new reputation: the Cathedral of Reconciliation. “You understand the enormity of the work, right?” she asked. “It’s changing our very flavor as a church. You could not stop this process now if you tried. It’s too far in bloom.”As messy as St. Paul’s reconciliation work has sometimes been, the 60-member History and Reconciliation Initiative lends it a framework, a timeline and concrete goals. While Armstrong stressed that the goals are not set in stone, they offer a structure that participants value and respect. “It’s a four-year process, but we do have some deadlines,” said Memorial Working Group chair Lee Switz, “and that gives it a sense of urgency.”Along with the Memorial Working Group, two more working groups are nestled under the initiative: the History Working Group and the Music & Liturgy Working Group. With the History Working Group’s research as a foundation, the Memorial Working Group and the Music & Liturgy Working Group will determine St. Paul’s visible, audible reconciliation pieces. Revisions are planned to the church’s walking tour brochure, and its 175th anniversary book will be reimagined from the 150th anniversary predecessor.Presiding Bishop Michael B. Curry will visit next March. Prayerful Conversations remain ongoing and the church will hold a special service to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination. And in some way, whether by stopping at stations of reconciliation along Richmond’s Slave Trail or with a different ritual, History and Reconciliation Initiative members plan to commemorate African-American slaves in the city that had the second-largest slave market in the United States.In the meantime, as chair of the Initiative’s History Working Group, Christopher Graham has helped St. Paul’s to discover how racial ideas throughout the church’s history have determined how parishioners live their lives and faith. Originally 20 to 25 members, the History Working Group now has a core of seven active researchers. A historian by profession, Graham gave working group members guidance on what to look for as they research. “And that’s been a remarkable success,” he said.The group is uncovering the church’s relationship era by era, in five chunks of about 40 years, starting in 1844. They have scoured U.S. Census data, diocesan records, vestry records and private journals. They delve into Newspapers.com and Ancestry.com. And then there are secondary sources, including “Managing White Supremacy: Race, Politics and Citizenship in Jim Crow Virginia” by J. Douglas Smith, which Graham recently read.Cross-referencing the records from First African Baptist Church and St. Paul’s with census data, the History Working Group has confirmed that from its founding until the Emancipation, most St. Paul’s members “were engaged with slavery or in the slavery economy,” Graham said. This was not surprising. More illuminating has been learning St. Paul’s attitude toward race between the Emancipation and today. While its membership remains overwhelmingly white, in 2017 St. Paul’s is a “liberal” church with longstanding outreach projects and ties to social justice initiatives throughout Richmond, a city that initiative leaders described as more conservative than their church. St. Paul’s members “have always done what they thought was the Christian thing to do,” Armstrong said, “even if they thought it was segregation.”And for a long time, it was. “At the turn of the 20th century, Episcopalians and other white people were arguing that black people were evolutionarily behind whites,” Graham said. For generations after emancipation, St. Paul’s members participated in a government that enforced Jim Crow and segregation. This mindset continued, Graham suspects, until the early days of the civil rights movement, “and it’s more complicated than ‘we hate them.’ ”As St. Paul’s “whole story” emerges, the damage done by upholding the racial status quo is clear, Graham said. “So what does it mean? What are we doing about it?” he asked. He was working on a narrative of his working group’s findings.That narrative will feed the other working groups’ efforts. The Music & Liturgy Working Group has met twice. They began by asking why St. Paul’s needs reconciliation music and liturgy. The answer became, “We’re finding things at St. Paul’s that we need to mourn, and (in) the Episcopal Church music and liturgy is how we do that,” said Music & Liturgy Working Group chair Pam James, quoting fellow group member Michelle Walker.In the fall, James’s group will introduce a new collect, with the idea of adding one for each church season. The largest task ahead of them is sifting through the history group’s narrative to find lyrics for a piece of music. St. Paul’s will commission music to allow St. Paul’s to mourn its past. “Yet we are also cognizant of the fact that we’re going to send it out into the world for other churches to [use] for their own mourning,” said James.Things weren’t as immediately clear for the Memorial Working Group. “One of the first meetings was a free-for-all,” recounts Switz. “Everybody was talking past each other, but there were some strong emotions in the room.” The Memorial Working Group is charged with “seeking a physical or living/legacy expression of acknowledgment, commemoration, and reconciliation,” according to a History and Reconciliation Initiative flier. Initially, that mission got lost in the tumult, Switz said.She considered how to proceed in keeping with the yearlong theme of “Be Reconciled,” landing on the church’s congregation-wide read, “The Book of Forgiving,” by retired South African Archbishop Desmond Tutu. “Let’s all tell our story,” Switz said at the next meeting. The half-dozen working group members did just that for two hours, she said, opening the path to more discussion. They’re currently working on “a very concise statement” on what “visceral, spiritual message” a 21st century St. Paul’s wants to convey through its history and reconciliation memorial.Deep into research and reflection, parishioners seem patient with the process as it unfolds. “They’re taking their time, they have not rushed the process, and that’s been notable,” said Carl Stauffer, an associate professor at Eastern Mennonite University’s Center for Justice and Peacebuilding. Stouffer has visited St. Paul’s twice since December, guiding parishioners in reflection and workshop, and preaching. “There’s been a tremendous amount of effort in having the congregation buy into the process,” he added.When St. Paul’s clergy and initiative leaders talk, consensus around one point quickly reveals itself. “I don’t think we’re finished. I think we’re still working on reconciling with each other,” Armstrong said. “If we sincerely want reconciliation, if we’re serious about it, it should be a different church [in 2020],” she said.Beyond the process, beyond the memorial, the music and the liturgy, some at St. Paul’s wonder when reconciliation will conclude. “So how long will this process go, and how will we evaluate what the process achieved?” wondered St. Paul’s member Michelle Whitehurst-Cook. While she wants the History and Reconciliation Initiative’s efforts to remain ongoing, “I think there are lots of ways to continue [the work] and also to measure what we’ve achieved.” Whitehurst-Cook points to possibilities for measuring the initiative’s impact, from changes in outreach and church participation to gauging the number of sermons on social justice or talking with small groups.And Memorial Working Group member Barbara Holley offered a caveat as St. Paul’s moves forward. “It’s more than a black-white issue,” she said. “I don’t want to just hear from somebody, ‘I’m sorry.’ That would just make me mad. I want to know that by your actions.” Racial reconciliation wasn’t on Holley’s mind when she joined St. Paul’s, but being a part of the History and Reconciliation Initiative has catalyzed an internal shift. “I do believe it’s changing me, in just bringing more awareness to the divisiveness of racism,” she said.Holley’s sentiment represents another thread at St. Paul’s: Participants agree that as they target a communal paradigm shift, working with the initiative has already affected them personally. “For this to mean anything, it has to be personal,” said Adams-Riley.“I’m a Southerner, and I still am, in all the good and the bad,” said Armstrong. “(Notwithstanding) the brutality of slavery, I love Southern culture.” Nonetheless, she’s had “almost a transfiguration” regarding race. She recognizes it more, continues to learn and is increasingly dedicated to reconciliation, group to group, within herself and with God.However reconciliation unfolds at St. Paul’s, Stauffer credits the church with courage and vision. “What they’re doing is setting a national precedent for how faith communities can work through racial reconciliation,” Stauffer said.That this racial reconciliation has sprouted in the unlikeliest of places, in the Cathedral of the Confederacy, is never lost on Adams-Riley. Nor is the reality that that his forebears included slave owners and Confederate soldiers. “People who knew me growing up never would have expected that I would have been a part of this (kind of reconciliation),” he said.Yet he is. And he’s certain that it is important work with a connection beyond anyone’s intellectual grasp. “It becomes about how we live our lives today, about the spirit doing deep soul work that leaves us living differently,” he said. “I say lead on, spirit, lead on.”— Heather Beasley Doyle is a freelance journalist based in Massachusetts. Rector Shreveport, LA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT June 24, 2017 at 5:13 pm I would hope that the nazi swastika, and all that it represented (and, sadly, still does) would offend all civilized people, be they American, Canadian, European, Christian, non-Christian, and so on, around the globe. My father was one of the many thousands that died liberating the European continent and from when I first grasped what this symbol stood for until now I have hated (a word I do not like to use) it with a quiet passion. Given that background (and please understand that during the Civil War (although nothing civil about it) my ancestor families on both parent’s side suffered many killed and wounded – one lay imprisoned for months in Fortress Monroe – and homes and barns looted and burned to the ground) is easy for me to understand why the Confederate Battle Flag, as a symbol, would upset those of African ancestry. As is being suggested and done, its time to put the CBF in the museum. Besides, we have another flag we should be waiving. Peace June 20, 2017 at 6:42 am I find it horrifying that those at St. Paul’s and other places are trying to revise history. Bruce Garner is not part of the Atlanta I know. As with New Orleans and Saint Pauls and other places, I am sure that this dishonesty will continue. Comparing the confederacy to the Nazis is obscene. The Nazis were not our own brothers, our own flesh and blood, our comrades in arriving at the truth. People of all races need to know our history. It was the history of all of us, Horrifying and evil as it was, we need to know it! The Episcopal church does not seem to be able to break it’s love affair with popular culture, even for the truth of its history. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Rector Columbus, GA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Comments are closed. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Collierville, TN June 20, 2017 at 12:43 pm It seems to me that they are not censoring history, since the materials they have decided to take out of their worship space are either going to be placed in a historical presentation area in the church, or in a traveling exhibit. So, they are putting the history with the history and, again, it seems to me this is an appropriate place for them. Church buildings are not museums, they are places of worship, and choosing to honor or not honor the confederacy in a holy place has nothing to do with our responsibility to history (which, again, they are fulfilling) and other questions of what we want in our worship space are totally up to the congregation and the wider Church to decide upon. June 19, 2017 at 4:38 pm I was born in Atlanta and lived my entire life in Georgia and all in Atlanta except for 6 years. The Civil War was part of my upbringing in one way or another. There are Confederate memorials of all sorts scattered all over the place. Some so unobtrusive as to cause no notice, others glaring like a thousand watt bulb. Atlanta is the city it is now because it was burned to the ground during the Battle of Atlanta. My townhouse sits in one of the battle trenches for that war. We lived on a street named “Confederate Court” when I was a child. One of the elementary schools I attended was named for General John B. Gordon. I don’t think I knew much about who he was at that age. I know better now and as a white skinned person, I have a more circumspect view of Civil War issues.Reasonable white people, reasonable people, period, would be horrified to see Nazi symbols like the swastika displayed anywhere other than a museum. Why is it that our horror over that symbol doesn’t apply to symbols such as the Confederate Battle flag? Yes, certainly, all of this is part of our history as a nation….and it should be treated like a part of history. It should be taught accurately so we don’t make the same mistakes again. It should be taught so that we recognize the inherent evils of slavery and some of the symbols that represent that atrocity. But, it’s high time that we stopped romanticizing a war and its symbolism and relegated its physical imagery and artifacts to museums and history centers instead of continuing to offend with them. Our baptismal covenant vows call us to respect the dignity of every human being. When we know that certain symbols harm the dignity of others, why would we want to perpetuate their use? Are we that mean and insensitive? Yes, some of all of this is tied to family members and their history. That’s fine too, but that is still no excuse for offending others. All of us have family members we would rather not claim, but that’s life. Again, that, even family, is no justification for harming the dignity of another child of God.This war ended 150 years ago. Isn’t it time to move on or must we cling so tightly to something that remains horrendous? What value is there to worshiping a lost cause?Congratulations to St. Paul’s for having the courage to move forward. Director of Music Morristown, NJlast_img read more

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Crusaders vs Cheetahs – Super Rugby Round 5

first_imgWednesday Mar 28, 2012 Crusaders vs Cheetahs – Super Rugby Round 5 The Cheetahs gave the Crusaders a bit of a scare on the road but ultimately it was the home side, playing in front of their home crowd for the first time in two seasons, that won a very entertaining game 28-21.ADVERTISEMENT Posted By: rugbydump Share Send Thanks Sorry there has been an error Super Rugby 2012 Highlights Related Articles 465 WEEKS AGO Bulls vs Lions Highlights – Super Rugby Round… 465 WEEKS AGO Sharks vs Cheetahs – Super Rugby Round 18… 465 WEEKS AGO Stormers vs Rebels Highlights – Super Rugby… From the WebThis Video Will Soon Be Banned. Watch Before It’s DeletedSecrets RevealedGranny Stuns Doctors by Removing Her Wrinkles with This Inexpensive TipSmart Life ReportsIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier Living90% of People Have No Idea What These Two Little Holes Are ForNueey10 Types of Women You Should Never MarryNueeyShe Was the Most Beautiful Girl in the World. What She Looks Like Now is InsaneNueeyThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

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Rugby Explorer with Jim Hamilton – Episode 4: Italy

first_imgTuesday Jun 11, 2019 Rugby Explorer with Jim Hamilton – Episode 4: Italy Big Jim is back and this time he’s in Italy for the latest episode of the always popular travel-come-rugby-show, Rugby Explorer. After fascinating experiences in Hong Kong, Singapore and South Africa, the former Scotland international sets out to see what makes Italian rugby tick.ADVERTISEMENTAlong the way he stops off in historic Rome for some Gladiator training, before heading to the rugby heartlands of Treviso, as he visits the country’s most successful club team.WATCH THE PREVIOUS EPISODES OF RUGBY EXPLORER:Singapore | Hong Kong | South AfricaYou can follow Jim on twitter at @jimhamilton4 and watch his new show, Don’t mess with Jim, on Rugbypass weekly credit: rugbypass Posted By: rugbydump Share Send Thanks Sorry there has been an error See it to Believe it Related Articles 25 WEEKS AGO WATCH: Experts explain what actually happens… 26 WEEKS AGO WATCH: Leigh Halfpenny makes yet another… 26 WEEKS AGO Parisse alley-oop magic sets up brilliant… From the WebThis Video Will Soon Be Banned. Watch Before It’s DeletedSecrets RevealedYou Won’t Believe What the World’s Most Beautiful Girl Looks Like TodayNueeyUrologists Stunned: Forget the Blue Pill, This “Fixes” Your EDSmart Life ReportsDoctors Stunned: She Removes Her Wrinkles With This Inexpensive TipSmart Life ReportsIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier Living30+ Everyday Items with a Secret Hidden PurposeNueeyThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

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Station Center Family Housing / David Baker + Partners Archit…

first_img Year:  Year:  CopyAbout this officeDavid Baker + Partners ArchitectsOfficeFollowProductsWoodConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousingApartmentsUnion CityPabricoUnited StatesPublished on May 17, 2013Cite: “Station Center Family Housing / David Baker + Partners Architects” 17 May 2013. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Read commentsBrowse the CatalogSinkshansgroheBathroom Mixers – MetrisVinyl Walls3MVinyl Finish – DI-NOC™ EffectPartitionsSkyfoldIntegrating Operable Walls in a SpaceBricksEndicottBrick Facade at the Bruce Nesbitt African American Cultural CenterBathroom FurnitureBradley Corporation USAToilet Partition CubiclesSkylightsLAMILUXGlass Skylight F100 CircularLightsLouis PoulsenOutdoor Lighting – Flindt GardenRailing / BalustradesSolarluxBalcony Glazing – SL 60eUrban ShadingPunto DesignPublic Architecture in Residential ComplexDoorsLinvisibileLinvisibile Products in Palazzo VolpiChairshorgenglarusUpholstered Chair – diva 5-154Wall / Ceiling LightsHE WilliamsLED Downlight – 4DR RoundMore products »Read commentsSave世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream Timmons Design Engineers CopyMuralist:Mona CaronDeveloper:MidPen Housing CorpCity:Union CityCountry:United StatesMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© Bruce DamonteText description provided by the architects. Station Center is at the heart of Union City’s vision to create the Station District, a vibrant city center bustling with neighborhood retail, community parks and high-quality housing. Save this picture!© Bruce DamonteEnabled by the Proposition 1C TOD voter-approved bond program, Station Center Family Housing is the affordable inclusionary component of the Union City Master Plan, which calls for Union City BART Station to be revamped into an intermodal station.Save this picture!© Bruce DamonteThe LEED for Homes Platinum development stands on a former brownfield site sandwiched between the existing commuter and freight lines and currently cut off from the BART station by tracks. Save this picture!© Bruce DamonteThe workforce housing comprises 157 affordable rental units in two buildings that frame a public playground and overlook a new plaza and eventual direct connection to the BART station. Save this picture!© Bruce DamonteThe building is ringed with active edges: The elevation along the main thoroughfare is lined with retail arcade that is soon to house a corner caféand a market. Along the smaller residential streets, additional public and private entryways connect to the sidewalk. At the rear, the housing “wraps” the neighborhood-serving garage, shielding it from view. The garage serves to buffer the housing from the sound of the adjacent rail line.Save this picture!© Bruce DamonteInside, the central community room connects to a fitness center and pool deck, and opens entirely to a grand courtyard, creating a large indoor-outdoor gathering space.The courtyardfeatures allotment gardens for residents, formal and informal seating areas, and a play yard populated by playful concrete gorillas.The Bay-Friendly Rated landscape design will save 193,282 gallons of water per year compared with a conventionally landscaped property.Save this picture!© Bruce DamonteThe main entry is framed by a towering portal that is adorned with a community-sourced mural visible from the neighborhood and train line. The mural, inspired by an intrepid local plant pushing through the broken concrete, reaches to the sky, while the flower is “rooted” at ground level in multi-lingual messages of welcome contributed by new residents.Save this picture!© Bruce DamonteSays one nine-year-old who lives in the building: “Everyone here has roots in different parts of the world, and together we grow and blossom as a community.”Save this picture!PlanProject gallerySee allShow lessKickstarter Campaign Aims to Transform Denver Parking Lot into Outdoor ClassroomArchitecture NewsThe City of Fort Lauderdale Votes in Favor of BIG’s Marina LoftsArticlesProject locationAddress:Union City, CA, United StatesLocation to be used only as a reference. It could indicate city/country but not exact address. Share Architects: David Baker + Partners Architects Year Completion year of this architecture project Fletcher Studio Mechanical Engineer: ArchDaily Mark Thomas & Company 2012 Photographs Structural Engineer: Tipping Mar + Associates, FBA Structural Engineers Station Center Family Housing / David Baker + Partners ArchitectsSave this projectSaveStation Center Family Housing / David Baker + Partners ArchitectsSave this picture!© Bruce DamonteApartments•Union City, United States Barry Swenson Builder photographs:  Bruce DamontePhotographs:  Bruce Damontecenter_img Station Center Family Housing / David Baker + Partners Architects Civil Engineer: 2012 ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/372768/station-center-family-housing-david-baker-partners-architects Clipboard Horton Lees Brogden Lighting Design Apartments Projects United States + 26 Share Contractor: ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/372768/station-center-family-housing-david-baker-partners-architects Clipboard “COPY” Lighting Designer: Landscape: “COPY”last_img read more

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Hermes City Plaza / Standard Studio

first_img Apartments CopyApartments, Apartment Interiors•Rotterdam, The Netherlands Architect In Charge:Wilsum & van LoonCollaborator:Joyce KelderInterior Fit Out:Smeulders InterieurgroepCity:RotterdamCountry:The NetherlandsMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© Wouter van der SarRecommended ProductsMetallicsKriskadecorMetal Fabric – Outdoor CladdingWoodGustafsWood Veneered Wall & Ceiling PanelsWoodBruagBalcony BalustradesSuspension SystemsMetawellAluminum Panels for Ceiling SailsText description provided by the architects. Standard Studio, in collaboration with Joyce Kelder, designed the interior of the apartments and common areas of the ‘Hermes City Plaza’ building in Rotterdam. The former office building by Van der Broek & Bakema was transformed and extended by VANWILSUMVANLOON architectuur & stedenbouw into a residential building with 218 student houses.Save this picture!© Wouter van der SarEach year the Erasmus University program houses their freshman year students in the student houses. Inspired by the tiny house movement, Standard Studio succeeded in getting all these independently functioning homes into the building on the Stadhuisplein in Rotterdam.Save this picture!© Wouter van der SarThe challenge was to turn 15m2 into a complete student home. Complete means that this is fully equipped with a toilet, shower, vanity, kitchen, dining table, desk, couch, queen size bed and plenty of storage space. This has been made possible by using all of the surfaces that the small room has to offer. To be able to accommodate this the furniture has dual functionalities and the room’s height is used to the maximum.Save this picture!© Wouter van der SarSave this picture!© Wouter van der SarInspiration for the design comes from the tiny house movement. In tiny houses, space is used smarter and more importantly – not standard. Because of the wish for a queen-size bed, smart space was created from the height of the former office building. The bed is attached to the ceiling and hangs 2meters above the floor. The large wardrobe also forms a sturdy staircase to the bed.Save this picture!Section ASave this picture!Section BSave this picture!Section CBecause the house offers no space for a vanity unit and a sink in the kitchen, both have been ingeniously combined. The sink is divided by a floating panel which is on one side a sink with a mirror. And on the other hand, it is a sink in the kitchen with a handy chalkboard.Save this picture!© Wouter van der SarSave this picture!© Wouter van der SarBamboo is preferred over other types of wood because it is strong, durable, and light, yet has a warm appearance. The use of light shades allows the room to be as spacious as possible.Save this picture!© Wouter van der SarThe building is an extension of the houses. The facilities that you will not find in the apartments can be found within the building. From common areas such as the roof terrace, music room, TV rooms, a laundry bar to a study area. There are also individual facilities such as a bicycle spot and a private garden. Save this picture!© Wouter van der SarProject gallerySee allShow lessWakeup Academy / SU-CHI EXPRESSIONSelected Projects33rd Street House / Meridian 105 ArchitectureSelected ProjectsProject locationAddress:Rotterdam, The NetherlandsLocation to be used only as a reference. It could indicate city/country but not exact address. Share Save this picture!© Wouter van der Sar+ 77Curated by Martita Vial della Maggiora Share DuPrie bouw & ontwikkeling Hermes City Plaza / Standard StudioSave this projectSaveHermes City Plaza / Standard Studio Manufacturers: Mosa, Fest, Frandsen Project, MOSO, Tortu ArchDaily The Netherlands “COPY” ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/915432/hermes-city-plaza-standard-studio Clipboard Area:  4500 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project Hermes City Plaza / Standard Studio Projects ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/915432/hermes-city-plaza-standard-studio Clipboard 2017 Architects: Standard Studio Area Area of this architecture project Photographs:  Wouter van der Sar Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project Photographs “COPY” Year:  General Contractor: CopyAbout this officeStandard StudioOfficeFollowProductsWoodGlassConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousingApartmentsInterior DesignResidential InteriorsApartment InteriorsRotterdamThe NetherlandsPublished on April 20, 2019Cite: “Hermes City Plaza / Standard Studio” 20 Apr 2019. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogPanels / Prefabricated AssembliesTechnowoodPanel Façade SystemRailing / BalustradesMitrexIntegrated Photovoltaic Railing – BIPV RailingMetal PanelsAurubisCopper Alloy: Nordic BrassHanging LampsVibiaHanging Lamp – VOLConcreteKrytonCrystalline Waterproofing – KIMSkylightsLAMILUXGlass Skylight FE PassivhausPorcelain StonewareCosentinoSurfaces – Dekton® Chromica CollectionBricksFeldhaus KlinkerThin Bricks – ClassicGlassDip-TechDigital Ceramic Printing for Interior DesignWoodStructureCraftEngineering – FootbridgesAluminium CompositesCymat Technologies Ltd.Bundang Doosan Tower – Alusion™ Stabilized Aluminum FoamTable LampsRoss GardamDesk Lamp – OraMore products »Save世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my streamlast_img read more

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Bay Area reclaims King’s radical legacy

first_imgOakland, Calif. — For the fourth year in a row, the Anti Police-Terror Project supported the national call to reclaim King’s radical legacy, Bay style. APTP didn’t just have a huge, multinational, spirited and militant march on the Martin Luther King Jr. national holiday on Jan. 15. APTP held its fourth annual 96 Hours of Direct Action to #ReclaimMLK.The overall theme for this year was “#NonCompliance with the Trump/[Oakland Mayor Libby] Schaaf corporate agenda.” This started Jan. 12, with a day themed for actions against state-sponsored violence. Jan. 13 was themed against displacement, for housing for all. Jan. 14, was Indigenous and international solidarity day.Jan. 15 was the grand finale, with everyone joining in on the fourth annual March to Reclaim King’s Radical Legacy. About 2,000 people rallied and marched from Oscar Grant Plaza in downtown Oakland, past the Oakland Police Department headquarters and the county jail, through the Acorn housing projects in West Oakland and ending at the West Oakland Bay Area Rapid Transit station, where a BART police officer had shot and killed Shaleem Tindle, a Black man, only a few weeks ago.The march was led by children and differently abled people, to set the pace. Right behind was a contingent from Third World Resistance, which included banners proclaiming “Black Lives Matter from Haiti to the Bay” and “Hands Off Sacred Land, from Shellmound to Jerusalem, Palestine.”“From the federal government to local agencies, our most marginalized communities are being attacked, surveilled, pushed out and discarded,” said Cat Brooks of APTP. “We will not stand idly by or remain indoors while our friends, children, families are seeing their human rights and dignities stripped away. We will not comply.”Some of the actions which took place during the #96Hours included, on Jan. 12, a human billboard “morning wake-up call to say no to white supremacy” at the Rockridge BART, a rally to end state-sanctioned sexual violence in downtown Oakland and a giant projection to #DefendDurham on the San Francisco Federal Building.On Jan. 13, the major action was a campout on Oakland Mayor Schaaf’s lawn. This was in response to her “solution” to the housing crisis, calling on Oakland residents to open their homes to houseless people. APTP challenged the mayor to lead by example.Jan. 14 included a protest at the Richmond County Jail/Immigration and Customs Enforcement Detention Center; Third World Resistance’s teach-in on Martin Luther King’s resistance to racism, war and capitalism; a prayer at the West Berkeley Shellmound; and a #DefendTPS! [temporary protected status] rally for Salvadorans and Central Americans.As in past years, APTP organized this entire weekend of actions by calling out to the entire Bay Area movement, individuals and organizations, to come to spokes council meetings, which started in December. The spokes councils were a place where people could bring their ideas for actions, ask for or offer support and calendar their events so that they didn’t conflict with one another.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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Presidential election in Afghanistan: local media on the front line

first_imgNews “The credibility of this election is crucial in the run-up to the departure of the US-led coalition’s troops,” said Reporters Without Borders secretary-general Christophe Deloire. “Given the risks of fraud and corruption, the media will have a key role to play as a source of information for the population and as observers of a free and democratic election.“We have drafted specific recommendations for the authorities, who we urge to comply with their duty to guarantee journalists’ safety. This report is also targeted at the main candidates, who must give clear undertakings to ensure that freedom of information is firmly rooted in the Afghan people’s daily lives.”During its visit in September, Reporters Without Borders conducted an information campaign aimed at improving the preparation and protection of journalists while covering the election.Attacks and threats against local journalists in connection with their reporting are increasing in frequency. Since the start of the campaign in February, Reporters Without Borders has registered more than 20 cases in various parts of the country especially the cities of Kabul, Herat and Mazar-i-Sharif. Supporters of candidates have been responsible for some of these attacks and threats.Reporters Without Borders has a Handbook for Journalists during Elections that it published in partnership with the International Organization of the Francophonie. Persian and Pashto translations were produced to help Afghan journalists covering this election, one that is particularly sensitive and important for the country’s democracy. Copies were distributed to journalists attending a seminar that Reporters Without Borders held in Kabul and to 40 northern journalists who attended the meeting that RWB organized in Sayad, in Kapisa province, on 28 September. The handbook is available on the RWB website:Read it in Persan (فارسی/دری)Read it in Pashto (پشتو)The report condemns the impunity enjoyed by those responsible for acts of violence and harassment against journalists, most of which take place outside the capital. At least 19 journalists have killed in connection with their reporting since 2002. Women journalists in particular are often the targets of violence and intimidation. Afghanistan currently has 30 women running news media, most of them privately-owned. Although the government is supposed to ensure that 30 per cent of civil servants are women, none of the 68 state-owned media is run by a woman. The report also analyses the growth of the Afghan media and the uncertainties that affect them, which are related to their economic situation and the withdrawal of foreign troops.In its recommendations, Reporters Without Borders urges the authorities to revive the investigations into past crimes of violence against journalists that have remained unpunished; to ensure better cooperation between police, prosecutors and judges so that those responsible for violence against journalists can be brought to justice more quickly; and to adopt the law on access to information before the election.Reporters Without Borders also urges the government and the religious authorities to defend and promote the right of women to work as journalists, just as men do, including in the broadcast media.Read the report AfghanistanAsia – Pacific to go further News Reporters Without Borders is publishing a report on Afghanistan ahead of the presidential election scheduled for 5 April. The fruit of a fact-finding visit to the northern provinces of Parwan, Kapisa and Panjshir in September 2013, it is entitled “Presidential election in Afghanistan: local media on the front line.” The report evaluates the current state of freedom of information in Afghanistan on the eve of the election, in which the media will have a key role to play in providing news coverage despite the uncertainties and dangers to which they are constantly exposed as the withdrawal of foreign troops approaches. Situation getting more critical for Afghan women journalists, report says Related documents en_rapport_afghanistan_bd2.pdfPDF – 1.28 MB June 2, 2021 Find out more May 3, 2021 Find out more Follow the news on Afghanistan Help by sharing this information center_img Organisation March 28, 2014 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Presidential election in Afghanistan: local media on the front line RSF asks International Criminal Court to investigate murders of journalists in Afghanistan Receive email alerts News Afghanistan : “No just and lasting peace in Afghanistan without guarantees for press freedom” RSF_en News AfghanistanAsia – Pacific March 11, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

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‘A Very Hungry Caterpillar Day’

first_img ‘A Very Hungry Caterpillar Day’ TAGS  Pinterest Facebook Pinterest Twitter Facebook By Digital AIM Web Support – February 24, 2021 center_img WhatsApp Local News Twitter WhatsApp Wagner Noel Logo USE THIS ONE Wagner Noël Performing Arts Center and Basin PBS has scheduled A Very Hungry Caterpillar Day from 10 a.m. to noon at the Basin PBS new space, 203 N. Main St., the former Ritz Theater in downtown Midland. The free event will include creating caterpillars, coloring and story time featuring the Eric Carle classics A Very Hungry Caterpillar, Brown Bear, Brown Bear, and 10 Little Rubber Ducks. Snacks and drinks will be provided. Children will be able to enter to win the 50th edition book of A Very Hungry Caterpillar, Brown Bear, Brown Bear, and 10 Little Rubber Ducks plus a family four pack of tickets to the Wagner Noël show on Jan. 21. The play version of the Eric Carle’s timeless classic, A Very Hungry Caterpillar will take place at 2 p.m. on Jan. 21 at the Wagner Noël Performing Arts Center. Go online for information or tickets. Previous articleMATTER OF RECORD: Jan. 11 through Jan. 18Next articleLos Angeles Lakers waive 2-time champion guard Quinn Cook Digital AIM Web Supportlast_img read more

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Superintendents’ summit set for May

first_imgThe Permian Strategic Partnership and Education Partnership of the Permian Basin are joining forces to present a superintendents’ summit with district chiefs from West Texas and Eastern New Mexico. “That’s the reason for this May 5 meeting is so we can talk about how to wisely invest these dollars,” Muri said. Twitter Muri said Texas and New York are the only two in the country that have not released CARES dollars to their school districts. Pinterest Twitter Superintendents’ summit set for May Previous articleTEXAS VIEW: Lawmakers’ response to flood of gun deaths? Make it easier to own gunsNext articleDon’t forget breakfast! Ruth Campbell Bentley added that she wants to hear about what they’re thinking. The three chairs include Jonathan Fuentes, executive dean of Academic Partnerships at Odessa College, Courtney Wardlaw, public and government affairs advisor, Permian Division of XTO Energy, and Lisa Wyman, senior vice president credit union development and human resources at Complex Community Federal Credit Union. By Ruth Campbell – April 21, 2021 He added that this is a chance to talk about the right kind of strategic investments for students. In those three tranches of funds, Muri said there is education funding. He added that districts across the country are waiting for those funds to address learning loss. Ector County ISD Superintendent Scott Muri and TJ Parks, Hobbs Municipal Schools superintendent are acting as point people for the event. Facebook Pinterest The gathering will be held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. May 5 at the Bush Convention Center in Midland. Just before COVID-19 hit, the Grow Our Own concept was endorsed at the last meeting of the leadership team held at the Sewell Auto Tech building. The idea is to prepare students for not only automotive technician positions, but teaching, healthcare, athletic training and other fields. Muri said advocacy is important right now to free up the federal funds. PSP Chief Executive Officer Tracee Bentley said this is a rare opportunity, but hopefully it will be the first of many. “I can’t think of two better leaders to lead this great opportunity,” she said. Jim Nelson, chair of the Texas Impact Advisory Council, said he thinks it’s unlikely this will happen, but it’s important to advocate for the districts through local lawmakers. Nelson, who has been a Texas Education Agency commissioner and interim superintendent at ECISD, said it’s important that local communities have control over this funding and spend it wisely. Vega, executive director of the Education Partnership, said what’s exciting is this could help transform the landscape of education in this region. “We’re really excited to get to work,” Fuentes said. “We’re meeting with the executive committee of the Education Partnership” to determine their service area. Also at Tuesday’s meeting, was the launch of the Grow Our Own Action Network. He noted that the ECISD Board of Trustees in March passed a resolution urging lawmakers to let the federal funds flow to Texas school districts. EducationECISD The total funding, Muri said, would be about $100 million for ECISD over the next three years. This is one-time funding that can be used not only to address learning loss, but for new ventilation systems for schools and personal protective equipment. “All of us are very passionate about the work we’re going to do in the Permian Basin and we look forward to working with you,” Fuentes said. Facebook A PowerPoint presentation during the virtual meeting said the meeting will feature strategic planning focused on system level plans that will help districts effectively address the unfinished learning of students and strategic planning for use of one-time federal funding. WhatsApp The fear is that the state will use the federal funds to replace already designated state funds. WhatsApplast_img read more

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