AMC stock is flying. Should I buy now?

first_img Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares Shares in US cinema operator AMC Entertainment (NYSE: AMC) have had an incredible run recently. Last week, the stock rose 85%. Over a year, AMC is up around 710%.It appears UK investors have been getting in on the action. Last week, AMC was the most purchased stock on Hargreaves Lansdown by a wide margin. It was also the most traded stock on Freetrade, with buy orders up 300%.5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…Should I buy AMC myself? Let’s take a look at what’s going on.Why AMC stock is risingThe reason AMC stock has surged over the last few weeks is that Reddit (WallStreetBets) traders have piled into it. As a result, it appears to have experienced a combination of a ‘short squeeze’ and a ‘gamma squeeze’.A short squeeze occurs when short sellers (who have borrowed shares and sold them in order to try to profit from a falling share price) buy back shares to close their short positions.A gamma squeeze occurs when options traders buy large quantities of call options (which give the trader the right to buy the stock at a set price in the future). This forces market makers to buy stock in order to hedge their risk exposure. As it continues to rise, market-makers must continue buying more to maintain their hedges, further boosting the share price.Ultimately, the huge share price rise has very little to do with the company’s fundamentals. Don’t take my word for it. In a regulatory filing on Thursday, AMC said: “We believe that the recent volatility and our current market prices reflect market and trading dynamics unrelated to our underlying business, or macro or industry fundamentals.”90% downsideLooking at AMC stock now, I see it as a very risky investment. Sure, there have been some positive developments recently. Last week, for example, the company sold 11.6 million shares at an average price of around $51 each, raising nearly $590m. This will strengthen the company’s balance sheet.The company should also benefit as the US reopens in the months ahead. This year, analysts expect revenues to be double what they were last year.However, right now, the company’s share price and valuation make no sense at all, in my view. Currently, AMC’s share price is nine times Wall Street’s average target of $5.25. In other words, if Wall Street analysts are right, the stock could lose 90% of its value.AMC’s warning to investors It’s worth noting that, in a very unusual move, AMC has actually warned investors about buying its stock at the moment.“Under the circumstances, we caution you against investing in our Class A common stock unless you are prepared to incur the risk of losing all or a substantial portion of your investment,” it said in a filing last week.And Vanda Research, which tracks retail investor flows, said interest in AMC stock may have peaked last Wednesday. Since Wednesday, the stock has fallen 23% (which shows how dangerous these kinds of ‘meme’ stocks can be if my timing is poor).Better stocks to buyOf course, AMC stock could keep rising. Currently, short interest remains high. The short squeeze could have further to go.However, given the risks, I will be avoiding AMC. I think there are much better stocks I could buy. Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! Edward Sheldon, CFA | Monday, 7th June, 2021 | More on: AMC Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner.But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared.What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations.And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. Edward Sheldon owns shares in Hargreaves Lansdown. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Hargreaves Lansdown. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.center_img See all posts by Edward Sheldon, CFA “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” Image source: Getty Images. AMC stock is flying. Should I buy now? Enter Your Email Address Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this.last_img read more

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First female Anglican bishop for Africa elected

first_imgFirst female Anglican bishop for Africa elected Anne Warrington Wilson says: July 20, 2012 at 2:42 pm What wonderful news — the clear acceptance of women in leadership in yet another province of the Anglican Communion — and a clear call for rejoicing! Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Thomas Vocca says: Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Anglican Communion, Christopher Epting says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Hopkinsville, KY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Thomas Vocca says: Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Comments (24) Submit a Press Release Kevin Sanders says: July 19, 2012 at 5:47 pm Like the C of E? Tim Yeager says: Rector Smithfield, NC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET V. Tupper Morehead, MD, MDiv, TSSF says: Lynn Marini says: July 19, 2012 at 6:29 pm This is cause for great joy & thanksgiving. There is now a foot in the door of the Anglican Church. No doubt they may go through similar commotion we went through with the election of +Gene Robinson. We have become , in my opinion, a stronger Church. Growth is never without its growing pains. Blessing on Bp. Elect Wambukoya and her Diocese. The Spirit is alive and moving. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI July 19, 2012 at 9:49 pm Hope we get information on how/when we could go there for consecration celebration! July 20, 2012 at 3:57 am The reformation continues . Glory Be. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET July 19, 2012 at 8:42 pm This is great news, I am so happy for her, I know the Holy Spirit is working through her. Many Blessings to the new Bishop elect. Maria R.Forman, All Saint’s Episcopal Church, Redding, Ca Joan Desilets says: Rector Collierville, TN Submit a Job Listing Women’s Ministry Harriet B. Linville says: July 19, 2012 at 9:13 pm The Holy Spirit is NOT static! May God give you peace……….-T- This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Elizabeth Bishop says: The Rev. Phil Reinheimer says: Rector Belleville, IL Rector Bath, NC Rector Shreveport, LA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Maria Forman says: July 19, 2012 at 9:33 pm The holy spirit is definitely dancing! Thanks be to God. Comments are closed. Rector Martinsville, VA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Bruce Klaiss says: July 20, 2012 at 11:09 am The whole Diocese of Iowa rejoices with our Companion Diocese of over thirty years as we share in this moment. Bishop Mabuza invited me to share in the first ordinations of women priests in Swaziland together with a team of visitors from Iowa including the Reverend Barbara Schlachter, one of our own early Episcopal priests who was the preacher for the day. We followed this up with inviting three women priests from Swaziland to join us at Convention celebrating 30 years of women’s ordination in 2006. Last year I spent my sabbatical in the Diocese and served with the Rev Ellinah for the whole of Holy Week at the University Chaplaincy. She is a wonderful choice, and clearly being nominated at a later ballot, a modern day Ambrose of the Spirit’s making. Jeffrey Parker says: Bishop Alan Scarfe says: Cher Stone says: July 20, 2012 at 10:09 pm South Africa is once again the liberating capitol of the Spirit. Thank you! July 20, 2012 at 1:39 am The simplest and best thing to say is: Thanks be to God. August 2, 2012 at 10:13 am The Parish of Woodlands, Montclair with Yellowwood Park ( in the Diocese of Natal) recieved this news with great joy. We wish Bishop Elect Ellinah Ntombi Wamukoya Gods richest blessings and we pray for her and her family. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Marge Christie says: Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET July 19, 2012 at 6:28 pm Swaziland is in a “long term relationship” (companion diocese) with the Episcopal diocese of Iowa. We are so proud! In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET [Anglican Communion News Service] The Anglican Church of Southern Africa July 18 made history by electing the first female Anglican bishop on the continent.The Rev. Ellinah Ntombi Wamukoya, 61, became the bishop-elect of Swaziland and the first woman bishop in any of the 12 Anglican provinces in Africa. It is thought she is only the second bishop elected in a mainline church on the continent.Her election comes as the Anglican Church of Southern Africa — which also includes Angola, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa and Lesotho — commemorates 20 years since the ordination of women to the priesthood as presbyters and bishops. The 1992 synod was, coincidentally, held in Swaziland.Wamukoya was not initially a candidate, but after seven rounds of elections yielding no results, fresh nominations were invited from the Elective Assembly. She subsequently received the required two-thirds majority in both houses of laity and clergy.The assembly was described by one observer as a “particularly spirit-filled atmosphere” and there is said to be much excitement in the diocese over her election. Founded in 1968, the Diocese of Swaziland comprises of three archdeaconries: Eastern Swaziland, Southern Swaziland and Western Swaziland. Her predecessor is the Rt. Rev. Meshack Mabuza, who became bishop of Swaziland in 2002.Wamukoya is currently chaplain at the University of Swaziland and St. Michael’s High School in Manzini, Swaziland. She also serves as chief executive officer of the City Council in Manzini.The election has to be confirmed by the members of the Synod of Bishops. When that happens, Wambukoya will become the 24th non-retired female bishop of the Anglican Communion. The member Churches that have appointed or elected women bishops to date are Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia; Australia; Canada; The Episcopal Church, Cuba and now Southern Africa.As there are several other dioceses of Anglican Church of Southern Africa electing bishops before the end of the year, it is likely there will be one big consecration service for them all, early next year.Celebrations of the 20th anniversary of the ordination of women to the priesthood in Southern Africa will be held in September 2012 on the margins of the Provincial Standing Committee meeting, with the Episcopal Church’s Bishop Barbara Harris as a special guest. An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Africa, The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group July 19, 2012 at 6:17 pm Marvelous! Tom Morson says: Youth Minister Lorton, VA Featured Events Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs July 19, 2012 at 7:47 pm Wonderful news!Here in the companion diocese of Brechin (Scotland), we are all delighted. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK martha knight says: Lovette Tucker says: TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab July 20, 2012 at 9:24 am A monumental step forward. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Tags Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Press Release Service July 19, 2012 at 5:48 pm The Holy Spirit is revealing to us all, and we are listening. My heart is dancing and grateful. By ACNS staff Posted Jul 19, 2012 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH July 19, 2012 at 3:47 pm Congratulations and welcome to the community of progressive believers. We are eagerly anticipating this action in the anglican diocese of the western, developed nations of the world. Rector Pittsburgh, PA Mervyn E. Singh says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York July 19, 2012 at 8:03 pm This is wonderful news! I wish the Bishop elect the blessing of health and support for a long, effective episcopate. Curate Diocese of Nebraska Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Bill Cruse says: Hugh Magee says: People, Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Director of Music Morristown, NJ July 20, 2012 at 8:51 am We rejoice with you in this great news. Submit an Event Listing Associate Rector Columbus, GA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Knoxville, TN July 19, 2012 at 7:41 pm Blessings to Bp. -elect Wamukoya and to the Diocese of Swaziland. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY Rector Tampa, FL July 19, 2012 at 9:00 pm What a wonderful day for women and young girls who need positive role models in their lives. The Lord works in wonderful ways. Blessings to all in Africa. Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC July 19, 2012 at 9:03 pm I recall reading, when Katharine Jefferts Schori was elected as presiding bishop, that Desmond Tutu’s reaction was “Oh, goody!”. My reaction to this news is much the same. I must say that it came as a surprise, as it seems that Swaziland has had female clergy a relatively short time. But it is small surprise because, as an Iowan, I know the faith, courage and generous spirits of our good friends in the diocese of Swaziland. I wish them well as they go on from this new beginning! Course Director Jerusalem, Israel July 19, 2012 at 2:51 pm This news makes me want to dance!last_img read more

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Florida among states with most COVID-19 workers’ compensation medical claims

first_img You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 The Florida state flag flies. railway fx / Shutterstock.com Please enter your comment! Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. TAGSClaimsCOVID-19DatafloridaMedical ClaimsStatisticsThe Center SquareWorkers’ Compensation Previous articleApopka Police Department Arrest ReportNext article1.7 Million Fewer Floridians are Forecast to Travel for Year-End Holidays Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Please enter your name herecenter_img Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate The Anatomy of Fear By John Haughey | The Center SquareFlorida was in the top five nationally in the rate of COVID-19-related workers’ compensation insurance medical claims filed in the first six months of 2020, a report released this week by the National Council on Compensation Insurance (NCCI) said.Florida recorded more than 300 COVID-19-related workers’ compensation medical claims for every 100,000 active claims between January and June, the NCCI reported, a 50% increase from 2019 averages.Only Alaska, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida and New Jersey topped 300 COVID-19-related workers’ compensation medical claims for every 100,000 active claims, according to the report, which doesn’t explain why these states have more such claims than others or what the exact per-100,000-claims ratio is, reporting only aggregates.A workers’ compensation claim is considered a “medical claim” if an injured or ill worker received at least one “medical encounter” while the claim is active. The NCCI compiled its medical claims data from its “medical data call.”The increase in medical claims is offset by a 15% decline in overall active workers’ compensation claims in the first quarter of 2020 and an 18% decrease in active workers’ compensation claims in the second quarter of 2020, according to NCCI.“There is no question that the COVID-19 pandemic has had and will continue to have a measurable impact on medical treatment of injured workers in the workers compensation (WC) system,” report authors David Colón and Raji Chadarevian wrote. “The question is … to what extent? The simple answer is a single metric, and that is time. It may be years before we grasp the full effect of this pandemic on WC.”According to the report, about 1,200 COVID-19 medical claims were filed in Florida during the first six months of 2020, with 70% filed by women.“One potential contributing factor to this disparity is that women represent a significantly greater portion of healthcare employment,” the report said. “According to the US Census, by far, the largest healthcare occupation is registered nurses, with over 2.4 million workers, followed by 1.2 million nursing, psychiatric, and home health aides. Women make up more than 85 percent of workers in both large occupation groups.”The vast majority of active workers’ compensation claims related to COVID-19 do not include a medical encounter or require hospitalization, NCCI noted.However, 20% of the medical claims required inpatient hospital stays, the report said, with 19% requiring admission to intensive care units.“Not surprisingly,” NCCI said, “admission into intensive care units drives the costs of COVID-19 workers’ comp medical claims.”According to the report, workers admitted to ICUs, on average, stayed in the hospital for 11.5 days compared with non-ICU patients who stayed an average 7.5 days.Hospitalization for patients who required admission to ICUs totaled an average of $67,300 per inpatient stay compared with $38,500 per inpatient stay for patients who weren’t admitted to ICUs, according to the report.While people with pre-existing conditions or comorbidities are most at risk from COVID-19, NCCI’s report showed only 16% of medical claims submitted in the first six months of 2020 had an “identifiable comorbidity,” such as hypertension or diabetes.“Worth noting, though,” the report said, “comorbidity is identifiable only if treated and reported by health care providers during the encounters. Additionally, at 16 percent, comorbidities play a larger role in COVID-19-related workers’ compensation claims than in non-COVID-19 claims, where just 5 percent of the claimants have co-morbidities.” LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitterlast_img read more

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Drugsline’s first campaign dinner raises £280,000+

first_img Howard Lake | 8 May 2006 | News Drug and alcohol addiction charity Drugsline held its inaugural campaign dinner last night at the Grosvesnor House Hotel in London’s Park Lane and raised over £280,000 at the event.Over 400 guests attended the dinner which marked fifteen years of operation for the East London-based organisation.Hosted by Linda and Dennis Baylin, the event included an emotive video which conveyed to guests the message that all children are vulnerable to the influence of drugs and alcohol. Advertisement Sir Jeremy Beadle conducted an auction, which included an “Apprentice” poster and book signed with a personalised message by dinner guest Sir Alan Sugar. Master of Ceremonies, former model Jilly Johnson, and comedian Johnnie Casson also entertained guests. Tagged with: Events Research / statistics  35 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThiscenter_img Drugsline’s first campaign dinner raises £280,000+ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

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Senate Report Shows EPA Enforcing WOTUS Rules Despite Court Injunction

first_imgHome Indiana Agriculture News Senate Report Shows EPA Enforcing WOTUS Rules Despite Court Injunction Facebook Twitter By Hoosier Ag Today – Sep 20, 2016 The American Farm Bureau Federation says Tuesday’s Senate report on the Clean Water Act proves the need for the Senate to act against the Waters of the U.S. rule. Farm Bureau President Zippy Duvall says the case studies presented in the report reflect “the serious concerns” Farm Bureau has raised over the last two years. The Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works released the report this week that Farm Bureau says exposes “reckless and unlawful actions in enforcing the Clean Water Act.” Farm Bureau alleges the Environmental Protection Agency and the Army Corps of Engineers have unlawfully stretched the limited authority Congress gave the agencies. Specifically, AFBF says, through the Clean Water Act, the federal agencies have regulated ordinary plowing, a normal farming activity exempted by Congress, and claimed authority to regulate tire ruts and puddles found on the farm.Duvall says the report shows the Senate should reconsider the measure to stop the Waters of the U.S. rule “at its earliest opportunity.” Scott Yager, Environmental Counsel with the NCBA, says this report will put pressure on Congress to pass legislation that would put an end to WOTUS.Source: NAFB News Service Previous articleFarm Groups Cautious of Merger Trend at Senate HearingNext articleSoybeans will be Silver Lining in 2016 Hoosier Ag Today SHARE Senate Report Shows EPA Enforcing WOTUS Rules Despite Court Injunction Facebook Twitter SHARElast_img read more

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TCU battles through injuries, wins Shawn Robinson’s first game as starting quarterback against Texas Tech , 27-3

first_imgBoschini: ‘None of the talk matters because Jamie Dixon is staying’ Garrett Podellhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/garrett-podell/ Boschini talks: construction, parking, tuition, enrollment, DEI, a student trustee Garrett Podellhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/garrett-podell/ ReddIt printMissing its starting QB (Kenny Hill), both starting LBs (Travin Howard, Montrel Wilson), starting free safety (Niko Small), starting kicker (Jonathan Song), and true freshman quarterback Shawn Robinson making his first start.The Horned Frogs shut down Texas Tech’s high-flying offense and the Robinson’s offense put up enough point to defeat the Red Raiders, 27-3. Although games aren’t decided after each team’s first possession, it sure felt that way. The Red Raiders opening drive lasted 21 plays, gaining 70 yards, and TTU head coach Kliff Kingsbury burned his first two timeouts. However, the Red Raiders had to settle for three on a 20-yard field goal by kicker Clayton Hatfield because their passing attack faltered in the red zone. Red Raider quarterback Nic Shimonek completed seven of his first nine passes for 42 yards, seemingly completing five-yard outs and slants every which way, but Patterson’s defense forced Shimonek outside the pocket and broke up a pass in the end zone on a critical down.Next, it was freshman Shawn Robinson’s debut as TCU’s starting quarterback. He only completed one pass for two yards, but the running game was a different story. The DeSoto product was lethal on the ground, gaining 68 yards on four carries including a 41-yard gain on a first-and-25 after a holding penalty.Horned Frog wide receiver capped off TCU’s first possession with a KaVontae Turpin two-yard rushing touchdown on a misdirection wide receiver reverse after Robinson faked a handoff up the middle to running back Kyle Hicks.“It was cool to see him get success right away,” TCU center Austin Schlottmann said. “It was pretty important for us to run the ball because it takes pressure off of him, and him having the ability to run helps.”Robinson became the first true freshman to start at quarterback in the 17 seasons Gary Patterson has been head coach. The last true freshman to start at quarterback for TCU was Casey Printers Sept. 25, 1999, at Arkansas State, a 24-21 Horned Frogs’ win. Patterson was in his second year as TCU’s defensive coordinator.He finished the game with 169 total yards and a touchdown pass, and the freshman led TCU in rushing with 113 yards on ten carries.“We won it with a freshman quarterback, he’s got a lot to learn, but he did a nice job,” TCU head coach Gary Patterson said. Kicker Cole Bunce lined up for the first field goal attempt of his career from 43 yards out, and he drilled it right up the middle to give TCU a seven-point lead, 10-3, with 1:14 left in the first half.The 43-yard field goal was the longest make of the season by a Horned Frog, and it occurred on Bunce’s first collegiate attempt.After Texas Tech opened the game going three-for-five on third down, TCU stopped the Red Raiders on their last seven third downs of the first half.With 7:11 left in the third quarter, Horned Frogs had the ball on their own 20. A couple plays later, the ball  was on the ground after Tech defensive back Justus Parker punched the ball out of Robinson’s hands on an option keeper, and the Red Raiders recovered for the first turnover of the day. Three plays later, the Red Raiders lined up to attempt a 20-yard field and then this happened. Linkedin Garrett Podellhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/garrett-podell/ ReddIt TCU baseball finds their biggest fan just by saying hello Garrett is a Journalism and Sports Broadcasting double major. He is the Managing Editor for TCU360, and his passions are God, family, friends, sports, and great food. Previous articleTCU students participate in LEAPS day of serviceNext articleHoroscope: November 20, 2017 Garrett Podell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR + posts TCU quarterback Shawn Robinson runs the ball against Texas Tech. (Photo courtesy of GoFrogs.com)center_img Twitter Men’s basketball scores season-low in NIT semifinals loss to Texas Listen: The Podell and Pickell Show with L.J. Collier After Hatfield and the Red Raiders were stopped short by the TCU to come away with points on a drive that started at the TCU six, Robinson and TCU would put the game away.“That was huge,” TCU linebacker Ty Summers said. “We just trying to show Shawn that it’s ok, we’re here for you, and that whenever you fall, we’re going to pick you back up.”TCU running back Kyle Hicks said that stand change the game.“That was big for offense because previously we’ve had some struggles,” Hicks said. “After the defense got that stop and we marched down the field and scored, that was a big turnaround for the offense and our football team.”Early in the fourth quarter, Texas Tech was within striking distance once again with the ball on the TCU 30; however, the Horned Frogs evened the turnover battle after TCU linebacker Sammy Douglas jarred the ball loose from Shimonek on a scramble with 13:50 left in the game.After the fumble, the Horned Frogs utilized 12 plays to cover 78 yards and extend their lead to 17, 20-3, after Bunce nailed his second field goal of the day from 25 yards out.“Besides the kick out of bounds, I thought knucklehead [Cole Bunce] did a great job,” Patterson said affectionally. “He kicked field goals the way we needed to.”On the Red Raiders next possession, the TCU defense got on the scoreboard. After Tech reached the Horned Frog 11, Shimonek threw toward the left sideline, and Horned Frog cornerback Jeff Gladney ripped the ball away from Tech wide receiver Dylan Cantrell to run it all the way back 93 yards for a touchdown. The score increased the Horned Frog cushion to 24, 27-3, with 4:39 left to play.“Turnovers are huge because it’s just a complete swing in momentum,” Summers said. “When we had that, especially it gives our offense confidence knowing they can go out there and try to get big plays and force plays for big yardage because they know if we fail, we have there backs to get the ball back to them to give them another chance.”Patterson’s defense has now held its last five opponents dating back to Kansas scoreless in the second half.“First drive, we were in a four-man front on the defensive line, and then I switched to a three-man front,” Patterson said.  “The biggest thing is Texas Tech spreads things out, three-man front doesn’t look like you have as many people in the box, but you get as many people and you have more coverage people on the wideouts, especially the way we change coverages. The kids did a great job of that today.”Up NextThe Horned Frogs are now one win away from an appearance in the Big 12 Championship Game at AT&T Stadium Dec. 2. There’s just one thing standing in their way: its I-35 rivals from Waco, the Baylor Bears.“It’s really meaningful to have the opportunity,” Hicks said. “That’s one of our goals we set out to do this year is play in the Big 12 Championship game. That job is not done yet. We have to go out there on Friday and take care of business.”TCU hosts Baylor in its regular season finale Friday Nov. 24 at Amon G. Carter Stadium. Kickoff is set for 11 a.m. Linkedin Garrett Podellhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/garrett-podell/ Facebook Another series win lands TCU Baseball in the top 5, earns Sikes conference award TCU rowing program strengthens after facing COVID-19 setbacks Facebook Twitter Garrett Podell last_img read more

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No quick solutions, says Brosnan

first_imgPrint Advertisement Linkedin Twitter WhatsApp NewsLocal NewsNo quick solutions, says BrosnanBy admin – February 12, 2009 526 center_img THE Mid West region faces significant economic challenges and there will be no quick solutions, warned Denis Brosnan, chairman of the Task Force, set up by Tanaiste Mary Coughlan, at their first meeting in Limerick, this Tuesday.The Task Force was set up in the wake of the announcement of substantial jobs losses at Dell to examine and report on the policies and strategies necessary to ensure a competitive and sustainable economy in the Mid West region into the future.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up The members are:* Denis Brosnan, Task Force Chairman* Martin Cronin, Chief Executive, Forfas* Roger Downer, former President of the University of Limerick* John Fitzgerald, Chairman, Limerick Regeneration Boards* John Herlihy, VP Onlines Sales and Operation, Google* Anita Higgins, General Manager, Adare Manor Hotel & Golf Resort* Kay McGuinness, Chairperson, Shannon Foynes Port Company* Brian O’Connell, Chairman, Atlantic Way* Ken Sullivan, General Manager, Element Six* Vincent Cunnane, Task Force Chief Executive, and Chief Executive,  Shannon DevelopmentSpeaking after the first meeting Mr Brosnan said: “The Tanaiste has asked us to take an in-depth look at all factors impacting on economic development in the Mid West, and in due course to bring forward proposals to her and to Government on the policies and actions required to drive the Mid West economy. I look forward to working closely with my Task Force colleagues on the important task given to us”. Email Facebook Previous articleHand over idle tavern to museumNext articleLee and Power to fight in ‘Erin go brawl II’ adminlast_img read more

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Man arrested in quadruple murder at North Dakota workplace

first_imgEvgen_Prozhyrko/iStock(MANDAN, N.D.) — A man has been arrested in connection to a quadruple murder inside a North Dakota workplace, police said.Chad Isaak, 44, from Washburn, North Dakota, is being held on four counts of AA felony murder, Mandan Police said at a news conference late Thursday. He is being held at the McClean County Jail.The victims — an owner and three employees — were found dead Monday morning at RJR Maintenance & Management, a property management company in Mandan, said Mandan police.While the causes of death have not been released, the victims were all shot or stabbed, police said.Isaak’s car was identified at the scene of the shooting by surveillance cameras, officials said. Investigators later located the vehicle in Washburn.The suspect was arrested during a traffic stop Thursday, police said.Evidence in the vehicle gave investigators enough probable cause to make an arrest, according to Police Chief Jason Ziegler.The location where the suspect lived was a mobile home park managed by RJR, but police are not sure if that is part of the motive, Ziegler said.Among the victims in the shooting was employee Lois Cobb, 45. Cobb’s husband, employee William Cobb, 50, was also among the dead.The other victims were owner Robert Fakler, 52, and employee Adam Fuehrer, 42, said police.Authorities do not believe the public is in danger – Ziegler said the crime “was very specific to the victims that were involved.”“I don’t think any community across this great country could ever imagine something like this happen in their backyard,” the chief added, calling the crime “devastating” for the community.The chief called RJR Maintenance & Management a “reputable company in our area.”There were security cameras inside the building but the chief did not say if the crime was on video.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Ex-Professor to sue Manchester Uni

first_imgFormer Oxford Professor Terry Eagleton has publicised his plans to sue the University of Manchester for age discrimination after being forced by the University to retire from his current professorship at the age of 65. A failure to renew his contract, which states that every lecturer is under obligation to retire at 65, has led the famed literary critic to take action. Students at Manchester have rallied behind Eagleton and argued that he should be allowed to stay on.last_img

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‘What the hell — why don’t I just go to Harvard and turn my life upside down?’

first_imgLife stories from Annette Gordon-Reed, Martin Karplus, Steven Pinker, E.O. Wilson, and many more, in the Experience series. The setting of her childhood — Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley — instilled in Drew Faust a dual passion for history and justice.Weekend trips to battlefields and joining her brothers to play soldier helped to deepen her interest in the Civil War. Decades later, her study of the conflict’s devastating toll in blood and grief, “This Republic of Suffering: Death and the American Civil War” (2008), was named a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize.The inequality she saw in the world drove Faust’s early devotion to civil rights. At age 9, she penned a letter to President Dwight D. Eisenhower urging him to support integration. As a freshman at Bryn Mawr, inspired in part by Freedom Rider John Lewis, she skipped a midterm to march from Selma to Montgomery, Ala.Faust was a member of the faculty at the University of Pennsylvania for 25 years before her appointment, in 2001, as founding dean of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. Six years later she became the first woman to lead Harvard University, or, as she said at the time, “I’m not the woman president of Harvard, I’m the president of Harvard.” She will step down on July 1.ExperienceDrew FaustGazette: You grew up in the Shenandoah Valley. I’d love to hear a little bit about that and what your early life was like.Faust: I grew up on a farm. My father was in the horse business, so I was always surrounded by animals. I rode a pony, had sheep in the basement, little lambs that we saved when their mothers died in the winter, and ducks, chickens, rabbits, dogs, cats, everything you can imagine. When I was in, I guess, seventh grade, I got very interested in joining the 4-H Club and in animal husbandry. So I raised a steer both my seventh- and eighth-grade years. The first one was named Toby, after Sir Toby Belch in “Twelfth Night,” and the second was named Ferdinand, after the book about Ferdinand the bull who sits down and smells the flowers.I’d get up every morning before school, go feed them, and groom them in the afternoon. And I’d go to the 4-H meetings. I was the only girl interested in animal husbandry, all the other girls were doing sewing and canning and those kinds of things. I was always kind of a tomboy.Gazette: You’ve described yourself as a rebellious daughter who clashed with your mother. What were those clashes about?Faust: A lot of them were about clothes, because I guess clothes make the woman, she would have thought. She was always trying to put me in what she regarded as appropriate clothing. There’s a portrait of me painted when I was 4. I remember coming home from school and being put in this little pink organdy dress that itched. The sleeves were tight. I hated it, and I didn’t want to sit still. It always seemed to me that boys’ clothes were much more comfortable and adapted to what I wanted to do, which was run around and go feed the steer or whatever.My mother’s desire to have me be a proper lady came up against constant resistance on my part. And then there were things like what my three brothers were allowed to do compared to what I was allowed to do. You could get a driver’s license when you were 15 in Virginia. So my mother established a rule that I wasn’t allowed to drive with the boys at night. I don’t know what she thought I’d be up to, whether it was she thought I’d be killed because they were crazy drivers or we’d be up to no good. I don’t know. But that infuriated me. Why was there that rule that applied to me and not to them? There were some rules about gender that I’m describing. But there were also these rules about race that I could never understand, and they seemed to me preposterous.We had a cook who worked for us named Victoria who was wonderful and a man named Raphael who just did everything — drove us to school; did errands for my father; everything you can imagine around the house; fixed things. We were very attached to him. He was very funny and very attentive to the kids.There was a bathroom off the kitchen that Raphael and Victoria used, and we were told not to use it. We had a segregated bathroom in our house. I couldn’t understand why I couldn’t use that bathroom if that was the nearest one. It all seemed very odd to me. It was explained to us that it was their bathroom and you shouldn’t be intruding on their privacy. And I’d say to my mother: “They don’t care. Why do you care?”Gazette: You wrote a letter to President Eisenhower when you were 9 urging him to support integration. Does it strike you now, looking back, that you had such a strong opinion about right and wrong at such an early age?Faust: I would explain it as a product of being a pretty intellectual, rational kid and being told one set of values in Sunday school and at school about what America was, and then seeing just enormous contradictions with what was going on in the world around me.  There’s a way in which the clear-eyed sight of a child doesn’t have the nuance to erase contradictions. It seems very stark. And I think it just seemed stark and contradictory to me. I was pretty outspoken on stuff. And I think maybe having to struggle for my own rights as a little girl made me think, “Who else is being excluded or treated unfairly?”,Gazette: You talk about being intellectual from a young age. Did that come from one parent or the other, or both?Faust: My father graduated from Princeton and was, I think, really smart. And my grandmother, his mother, who lived near us, was really smart and read a lot. Daddy was not intellectual. He read trashy books, but he was always very amusing and verbal and smart. My mother never graduated from high school. I think she was dyslexic. Two of my brothers are dyslexic. One’s a lawyer and the other has a Ph.D. in geology, so they’ve overcome it. But they had to have a lot of attention in school.My mother was led by emotion, not reason. That’s why I fought with her all the time, because I’d come up with these syllogisms of this is true, that’s true, therefore it is true that I should be allowed to do X. And she’d look at me and blow up and say, “I don’t care. Argue away. You’re going to do it because I said you are.”Gazette: Was there one critical thing you took from each of your parents?Faust:  I did take things from both of them. There are all these sayings my father had that I impose on everybody around Massachusetts Hall all the time, some of which I think are quite wise, such as that there’s no excuse for being lousy. In other words, treat people decently. There’s never an excuse for mistreating somebody. I think that’s a pretty good saying.And another one was, “Any one you walk away from is a good one.” He used to say after family occasions, when there were 24 people at Christmas lunch, and everybody had a beef with everybody else, you know, the whole normal family holiday thing — whose politics, whose resentments are going to come out over this meal? — when we’d get in the car and go home, he’d say, “Any one you walk away from is a good one.”After he died, I wondered where this came from. So I typed it into Google and I learned it was an aphorism used by pilots in the early years of aviation who crashed their planes all the time. So, of course, any one you walk away from is a good one. “My mother’s desire to have me be a proper lady came up against constant resistance on my part.” Gazette: What about your mother? It sounds like your relationship could be challenging.Faust: Yes, she was very intensely moral and moralistic — not to say judgmental about things. So she was pretty powerful in her insistence on things.Gazette: What do you think your mother would have thought of you becoming the president of Harvard?Faust: It’s just unimaginable to me. She died in 1966, when I was a junior in college. I don’t know what she expected me to grow up to be, certainly not president of Harvard. She was never very academically engaged. She always found it kind of puzzling and bewildering that I was a good student and loved school, so I think the whole academic dimension to my career would have been very startling to her, much less the Harvard president part.,Gazette: I was surprised to learn you were so young when you left Virginia. I think it was at 12 or 13 that you enrolled at Concord Academy — is that right?Faust: I was a year ahead of myself in school. I finished eighth grade when I was 12. It was in a little private school in Virginia. Most of the kids at that time went away to boarding school. It was also a time when the public schools in Virginia were closing instead of integrating, and there were a lot of lawsuits. So we did this tour of private schools. I looked at St. Timothy’s in Maryland and Milton and Concord and others. I just fell in love with Concord. It seemed very not full of itself, just sort of rational and more open than a lot of schools. It was, to use a word that gets overused, transformational for me to be taken seriously as a girl who loved intellectual things and to be in a community where there were a lot of strong women. It was an all-girls school at that time.Concord was really important for me in so many ways. One of them was a kind of growing and broadening of my political consciousness. In the summer before my senior year, I went on this trip to Eastern Europe. I visited East Germany, Czechoslovakia, Yugoslavia. We were a group of about 10. Three of the members of the group were African-American. I had never been close with African-Americans before who weren’t Victoria or Raphael. One of these young women was someone who had been one of the first to desegregate schools in Atlanta. One was a co-leader of the group, the brother of Sara Lawrence-Lightfoot and the father of Kimiko Matsuda-Lawrence, who created I, Too, Am Harvard.It was just an introduction to the inside view of what was changing in race in America that spoke to me. Concord made me open to it and aware of it. That summer, thinking about what freedom is behind the Iron Curtain, with a group of Americans who also were thinking about what is freedom, what is justice — that had a huge impact on me, and I think established the context for my outlook, my politics, since that time.The next summer, the person who ran these trips decided he was going to do one into the South. So I spent the summer of 1964 with a group of young people in civil rights hotspots in the South. We were in Orangeburg, we were in Birmingham, we were in Prince Edward County.Gazette: What was that like?Faust: It was pretty extraordinary. The point was to try to reach across difference. I remember a meeting we had with town officials in Farmville, Virginia, a town that had closed the public schools for six years rather than integrate them. We asked them why they’d done that, why they felt as they did about race, and we heard very directly the racist logic that undergirded segregation — the idea of inferiority. We were sitting there with African-Americans in the group. We stayed in Orangeburg with families. The family I stayed with had a 9-year-old who had been arrested 10 times for being active in the civil rights movement.While we were in Orangeburg, I was walking with an African-American from our group, and we got chased by a carload of white segregationists who were throwing things at us. Just as we were starting that work, the civil rights workers Schwerner, Goodman, and Chaney disappeared in Mississippi and were found dead later that summer. That summer we also spent time in Birmingham on what was called Dynamite Hill because white segregationists threw bombs at it trying to blow up the houses. It was a kind of upper-middle-class enclave. It’s the area Angela Davis came from. Her family was there. Successful African-Americans seemed to segregationists the most threatening to the whole notion of racial inequality. So that was a powerful summer.Gazette: And it sounds like Bryn Mawr was a powerful experience?Faust: It’s interesting when I think about why I chose Bryn Mawr. A number of my classmates went to Radcliffe. Looking back, I had no interest in going to Radcliffe.Gazette: Why?Faust:  I think it was a much healthier environment for women at Bryn Mawr than being a second-class citizen at Harvard, which is what I would have been had I gone to Radcliffe at that time. That was still the era when I wouldn’t have been allowed in Lamont Library. All of the faculty that taught me would have been male. At Bryn Mawr, there were male faculty, but there were a lot of very strong, accomplished women on the faculty. Of course, women were in leadership positions and ran the place. So it was a very different environment from what I would have encountered if I were a few years younger and had gone to Princeton or Yale. It would have been a very different experience. So I was in a kind of country of women at Bryn Mawr. “I think it was a much healthier environment for women at Bryn Mawr than being a second-class citizen at Harvard, which is what I would have been had I gone to Radcliffe at that time.” My first year there I was still very much in the mindset from that summer being in the South and less interested in my schoolwork. In letters to a friend that I recently found I questioned being in school when the world was erupting. So I became very active in a variety of political causes, including the then-version of Students for a Democratic Society, which had not become the kind super-radical organization it later did. Then it was a grass-roots democracy organization. We worked with communities in Philadelphia. I worked on rat-control projects and I spent a lot of time on weekends, and other times, too, in the city. I was much more engaged with that than I was with my schoolwork.Gazette: Was that the year you skipped an exam to protest in Alabama?Faust: Yes. When the spring rolled around people in Selma were being battered, including John Lewis, and I saw it on television and I knew I had to go. I persuaded my then-boyfriend, whom I’d worked with on the rat-control project, that we needed to go to Selma. We borrowed his roommate’s car and I told my sociology professor, Mr. Schneider, that I was going to cut the midterm because I was going to Selma. He was really concerned. I was 17 years old, and he asked me if I was telling my parents. I said no. So he said, “I want you to call me every 24 hours, and if I don’t hear from you, I’m going to do something.”So off we went. We alternated driving 100 miles at a time and we arrived in Atlanta exhausted. I knew my way around a little bit from being there the previous summer, so I took us to Morehouse College, where we parked in their parking lot to sleep in our car. (You also had to be worried, then, that you were traveling around with a guy you weren’t married to. That was as big a deal as any of the rest of it.) While we were there a guard came up and knocked on the door, and we thought, “Oh Lord.”  We rolled down the window and told him we were on our way to Selma, and he said, “Bless you,” and kept going.We got to Selma the next day, parked our car, and walked toward the Brown Chapel, where the pre-march gathering was taking place. Halfway there we wondered if we might be killed on this adventure. But we had heard that Lyndon Johnson had nationalized the Alabama National Guard, so that meant there was going to be some law and order. As we were walking from the car to the chapel, we saw these two Alabama National Guardsmen coming toward us. We thought, “Oh, they’re here to protect us.” But as we walked by one of them just hauled back and slugged me in the chest.Gazette: What?Faust: Yes, and then he just kept walking. I think we marched maybe nine miles that day. We spent the night with a local family who took us in, as many families were doing for the marchers.Gazette: You worked for HUD after you graduated from Bryn Mawr. Did your activism in school inform that choice?Faust: Yes. By that time, there had been all the urban rioting. King had been killed the spring of my senior year; cities went up in flames. So a lot of the attention to issues of race and justice in the United States had shifted from the South. King took them more north, and began calling for more economic justice. He was not a popular man at the time he died. He was not seen as a hero; he was seen as antiwar and too left. The North was pretty happy about justice in the South, but not so happy with attacks on discriminatory housing policies and segregation and so forth in the North.So the whole possibility of the clear-eyed moral cause that the early civil rights movement had represented — or the early ’60s and mid-’60s represented — evaporated in the conflicts of 1968. In the time between my freshman year and my senior year, I got very involved with anti-Vietnam campaigns: marches on Washington, working with an organization called Vietnam Summer in the summer of 1967, going door to door to talk to people.I also got involved with something called the Committee of Responsibility (COR), an organization that was set up mostly by doctors who practiced at Temple University who were concerned about children being disfigured in Vietnam by napalm. The group raised money to bring kids to the United States for plastic surgery and rehabilitation. I think they also thought that if these children were brought to the United States and more people were made aware of what was happening in Vietnam, it would be an antiwar effort as well.So I was active with them, I raised money with them, I gave talks with them. I did a lot of photography when I was a junior and senior in college and together with a psychiatrist at Temple, whom I had met through COR, we proposed this project for North Philadelphia of getting kids in the community Polaroid cameras and having them photograph their communities and use that as a way into mental health issues in the North Philadelphia community. I applied for a grant together with him. It wasn’t funded, so I didn’t get to do that.,Gazette: What inspired your turn from HUD back to academia?Faust: I found much of working in the federal bureaucracy frustrating. I also missed being in universities, colleges, where people could speak their minds. I arrived at HUD in the summer of ’68, when everything was being directed toward getting Hubert Humphrey elected, and then he wasn’t. So there was this political shift. For a political naïf, it was an introduction to the realms of politics. I ended up being asked a lot at HUD to write, because people thought I wrote well.Gazette: You earned honors in history at Bryn Mawr, and hold advanced degrees in American civilization from Penn. I’m really interested in understanding where your passion for history came from.Faust: Oh, my passion for history — it was so overdetermined, because when I was a kid we used to go to the Civil War battlefields on weekends.  My brother collected Civil War armaments. We played Civil War in the woods around the house. History was so present in everything.Gazette: Can you expand on that a little bit? What was it about those childhood experiences that so struck you that you chose to carry them with you into your professional life?Faust: I’d say it’s a pervasive sense of the presence of the past. This is almost a cliché in Southern history, in Southern literature, but I do think it’s a characteristic of the South, the places inhabited, as Faulkner said, by “defeated grandfathers and freed slaves” [“Absalom, Absalom!”]. It’s just that those realities of the war and its memory, and the legacy and the terrible stain of slavery, are omnipresent. It is a force in how people live their own lives in the present, and that’s evident.Gazette: Let’s turn to your writing, in particular “This Republic of Suffering: Death and the Civil War.” I’d love to know how you came to that specific topic.Faust: Two things. I entered Civil War studies as a practicing Civil War historian at a time when U.S. history was changing dramatically. It was moving from a focus on generals, politicians, battles, and war to much more attention on everyday life and social history and the experience of people other than the powerful.So there was this whole shift in emphasis that transformed the historiography of the Civil War, beginning probably in the early ’80s, and I very much benefited from that wave, because it opened up so many other dimensions of the experience of war that hadn’t been really treated adequately before. So that was one thing. I had been trained to think about what was people’s experience, rather than who made what happen on a policy, political, or military level.There was also a personal dimension to it. I was diagnosed in the summer of 1988 with breast cancer. I was 40 years old, and it was this stunning news from a mammogram. I had a mastectomy and was just shocked and kept thinking: What is health? What is sickness? What is life? What is death? It had a big impact on me.Afterwards, I wanted to work with breast cancer patients, and I did so through an organization called Reach To Recovery, where newly diagnosed breast cancer patients connect with breast cancer survivors. I wanted to do it partly because I wanted not to forget what that experience of looking at death had been like when I had my mastectomy — when I was diagnosed. Because I think it so sharpens your perceptions and makes you smell the flowers, makes you re-prioritize, makes little perturbations of life seem irrelevant. And that was very valuable.Also, I kept reading about these 19th-century Americans, and I reported in my lectures in class on this enormous death toll. The fundamental experience for these people was death — either the threat of it or the reality of it; the proximity of it. No historian had talked about this. And as I started reading more about it, I came to see that this notion of living a life in which the awareness of death is ever-present is an enrichment of life rather than a diminution of life. In the 20th century, there’s a lot of literature about our denial of death, our refusal to confront death, our resistance to talking about it. And I could see some of the dimensions of what my experience had brought reflected in how 19th-century Americans thought about the good death and how important it was to think about death. “I wanted not to forget what that experience of looking at death had been like when I had my mastectomy.”center_img But as I embarked on the project, I just found more and more astonishing things that I had not been aware of. No one ever notified a soldier’s family when he died. There were no dog tags, so there were all these people who were unidentified. So it was just unfolding — this panoply of information and insight that was, I think, never addressed before because it was so obvious that no one ever thought to.Gazette: That’s the historian’s dream, right, to be able to look at existing material and come up with something new and different? Did you know that you were onto something that would resonate?Faust: Yes, it became evident to me that this was a really important subject. I was asked to give an honorific lecture — the Fortenbaugh Lecture, which is presented by a historian every year at Gettysburg at the anniversary of the Gettysburg Address. I tried out the death idea there, and people were just so responsive. So I started working away at it, but then along came Radcliffe, and that delayed it a lot. But I was just determined I was going to finish this.Gazette: You were at Penn for 25 years as a member of the faculty. What inspired you to consider switching to an administrative role for the Radcliffe job?Faust: I was asked often to do administrative things at Penn. I was part of this first wave of substantial numbers of women as institutions began to think about placing women in leadership positions and responding to the needs of their female students. So I was asked to consider administrative posts quite a lot, and I always felt I wanted to stay with my scholarship and in my classroom, so I resisted it.Still, as I got further along in my career, I was constantly being asked to do administrative things — run a committee, be vice president of the American Historical Association, run a big committee for [Penn President] Sheldon Hackney. At Penn I was on a committee that ended up being called the Faust Committee, which I objected to strenuously. It was a committee focused on the university community and on inclusion and belonging. Do you know the Penn campus at all?Gazette: No, not really.Faust: There’s this kind of central artery of the campus that used to be a street and was turned into a pedestrian thoroughfare called Locust Walk. One of the issues we faced was that all the Penn fraternities were along Locust Walk, so the campus’s central artery was dominated by these organizations. Guys would sit out in front and comment on all the women when they walked by. So one of the commitments of this committee was to diversify Locust Walk and move a number of the fraternities off of it and to put a women’s center there. Sounds familiar, right?Gazette: Yes.Faust: So I was constantly being asked to do all this, and I thought, I need to get my head on straight and either say no to more of this or really take on an administrative job and do it as my day job and say: I’m committing myself to this. I’m not just going to try to do it on top of everything else.Around that time, [Harvard President] Neil Rudenstine called me and said they had just merged Radcliffe and Harvard and that this new organization was being set up. He was seeking suggestions for what the institute ought to look like and who should be dean. I’d been around the block a couple times. I knew that I was on his list. So we had a conversation. Then he came to Philadelphia and we met and had another good conversation. Then he called me again, maybe late November. In January, he called again. He said, “You may know that I’ve been calling you because I’m really interested in having you be a candidate for this position.” I told him I was never leaving Penn, and that I was never going to be an administrator. He said, “Well, if you have as much as a 1 percent interest, would you just keep talking to me?”Gazette: That’s a good line.Faust: I used that on [current Harvard provost] Alan Garber — the exact same line. It worked too. So we kept talking. He asked me to come up and meet with the committee, and I really didn’t think I was going to do it. I said to Charles, “How would you feel if I said I wanted us to move to Massachusetts?” [Faust married Charles Rosenberg, a historian of medicine, in 1980.] He just didn’t take it seriously, because I’d said no to all these other opportunities over the years.Gazette: You had turned down Harvard before. Why?Faust: The history department was really a mess. They had been unable to appoint anyone in U.S. history for well over a decade. I felt if I came here, I would have to spend my time helping to clean it up, and I had a really nice, happy situation in Philadelphia.Then, come mid-March 2000, I said yes to Neil, much to my astonishment. I think cancer played a role in this decision as well. In January 1999, if I get my dates right, I was diagnosed with thyroid cancer, and I had a thyroidectomy. I remember thinking to myself very explicitly through all these conversations: If there’s going to be risk in my life, why don’t I take some risks instead of having these risks imposed on me?I think that having the second cancer made me think, What the hell — why don’t I just go to Harvard and turn my life upside down? Which I don’t think I would have done, necessarily, without that. It also meant I didn’t have to disrupt my daughter because she was going to college anyway. That made it easier. And then there’s a third part of it, which is that Neil assured me that because it was an institute for advanced study, I would be able to have time to devote to my death project, to my work. It didn’t turn out that I had as much time as he had anticipated, but it was like easing into administration, in the sense that it seemed like I could retain a scholarly identity with it.Gazette: It sounded like it was a challenging time, and that there was a lot of reorganizing and cuts that needed to happen.Faust: I think Neil may have quite consciously chosen an outsider.Gazette: When you say an outsider, not someone who had graduated from Harvard?Faust: Not someone who had gone to Radcliffe, not someone who’d been embedded in the wars. He had described to me the cannon shots up and down Garden Street, between Radcliffe and Harvard. Relations were very difficult. The merger was pulled off through enormous effort and against the wishes of many. I think there were 30,000 Radcliffe alums, and 20,000 of them were irate, but none of them could blame me. I was like an innocent who marched in and said let’s move to the future.So I had all the irate alums to deal with, but then I also had an organization that was ill-suited for what it was supposed to be. It was supposed to become an institute for advanced study, but it had this vestigial structure, staff, identity, that needed to be changed. So I had an early conversation with Neil about where I would get my legitimacy. I’m this person from Penn. You’ve appointed me. Do I just order everybody to do everything?,Together, we decided that I would get a group of distinguished people to come and be an ad hoc advisory committee to help explore how the new Radcliffe should be structured. It was indeed a distinguished group and included the then-heads of the Princeton Institute, the National Humanities Center, the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, so the three most prominent organizations for advanced study. Caroline Bynum, a very respected university professor at Columbia, a Harvard alum, and advocate for women, was the chair. A scientist who is very well respected at Princeton named Shirley Tilghman was on it. She was not yet president. So I got to know her then.This committee was my cover and my advisers. I was named in March. I didn’t take office until the following January [2001]. From June on, the committee started working and they were invaluable. So that was a kind of context that helped me build the constituency for a lot of these efforts.Another thing that helped me was that over the preceding six or eight years, Harvard had recruited many women from Penn to the faculty. So there was this whole slew of women that I knew on the Harvard faculty: Claudia Goldin, Elisa New, Lani Guinier, Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham, Irene Winter. So I had a lot of friends who helped me translate Penn to Harvard.Gazette: At Radcliffe and as Harvard president, how did you balance all your professional responsibilities with being a mother?Faust: When Jessica was little, and really through high school, I was a faculty member, and that gave me a lot of flexibility about how I used my time. I didn’t have to sit in an office from 7 in the morning until 7 at night. I was expected to produce research and scholarship, but a lot of that I could do in the middle of the night or on weekends. So my time was more flexible. I could show up at her endless athletic events, which I loved doing, or go to a student-teacher conference, or stay home with her when she was sick. My husband, as you know, was also an academic, so between us, we outnumbered her — that helped. And we could adjust our time. I can’t imagine how I would have done this job with young children. It just seems impossible to contemplate, partly because it would have been so frustrating to be torn between spending time with children and doing the myriad of things that a president needs to do.Gazette: How do you separate out your private life? It must be challenging to have so many demands on your time and a job that is so outward facing.Faust: I can’t imagine doing this job at an earlier stage of my life, when I had a child at home. I would have had to have been much more aggressive about setting boundaries and so forth. There are not clear lines between the private and the public life in this job. You’re always president of Harvard. Any moment you can get a phone call. Any moment you can get a tweet or a text that something’s going on.We have a place on the Cape, and I would say we escaped there. A big division in my life is when I’m performing as president of Harvard and when I’m not performing the role of president of Harvard — when I’m going to the dump on Cape Cod. I love it. I’m heaving the bags of garbage into the garbage bin, and nobody knows or cares who I am.But even on a Sunday, when we’re walking around Fresh Pond, people recognize me. They don’t necessarily come up to me then. I’ll meet them at some event at Harvard, and they’ll say, “I see you all the time walking around Fresh Pond.” So you are the president of Harvard all the time.Gazette: How has your husband helped you navigate that?Faust: He’s been amazing. I didn’t know what his reaction to this would be or how he’d want to be part of it or not. I anticipated that there’d be so many things he wouldn’t want to be part of and that he would kind of keep his life very separate. He’s embraced it. He’s participated in just about everything. He really, I think, enjoys it.Gazette: And it must be nice to have someone who understands and knows Harvard, too.Faust: He’s hugely supportive. The hardest thing is that he can be very protective. He always wakes up incredibly early, often at four in the morning. So I’ll come stumbling downstairs and The Boston Globe will be there, and he’s been waiting for two hours to say, “What is this about? How dare they say this about you! Who’s going to slay this dragon?” And I’ll read it, and I’ll go, “Oh, that’s nothing,” or “People say that stuff.” He can get much more excited than I do about things that are hostile to me.Gazette: You’ve said knowing that Celtics great Bill Russell struggled with nerves before every game has helped you handle anxious situations at Harvard. Can you single out your most anxious moment as president?Faust: FAS faculty meetings.Gazette: My final question: What is next for you?Faust: I want to learn to be a historian again. That’s my first goal. So I’m going to dig around the archives, see what I want to write.This interview has been edited and condensed.last_img read more

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