Taxes Top Priority for Indiana Farm Bureau

first_img One of many standing votes during the IFB policy meetingOver the weekend, the state’s largest farm organization met to set policy for the coming year. Taxes topped the list of priorities for Indiana Farm Bureau. The daylong meeting produced spirited debate on several issues, but one issue that saw a unanimous consensus was property taxes.  IFB President Don Villwock said farmers are united in their opposition to the proposed soil productivity formula, “Some counties would see a 35% increase in their farmland property tax as a result of this new formula; coming in a drought year, that is a real slap in the face for farmers.”  The Department of Local Government Finance set the formula last year based on data that was more than 10 years old. Villwock told HAT more time is needed to develop a new formula that is based on reality, “Even the agronomy department at Purdue said  there was not a validity of the data used to calculate the new formula.”  NRCS has also stated they need more time to study the formula. Farm Bureau lobbied for, and got, a one year delay in the implementation of the new assessment. Now Villwock says legislators must step up and address a long term solution to the issue, “It is time for lawmakers to take a leadership role on this issue.”AFBF Tax Specialist Pat Wolf addresses Indiana policy meetingPolicy delegates also sent a strong message on federal taxes, especially the estate tax which is set to increase sharply at the first of the year. Villwock said, if Congress allows these increase to go into effect, it will be devastating for farm families, “The exemption will drop from $5 million to $1 million and the rate goes from 35% to 50%. I think that is unconscionable.”  AFBF tax specialist Pat Wolf told the group on Saturday that no action on tax reform will take place in Washington until after the election. She said there are some in Congress who want to let the taxes increase so they can lower them again later in the year and take credit for it.The IFB policy resolutions are developed on the county level and then brought before a meeting of delegates and IFB board members from around the state.  These policies will set the organization’s position on state issues. IFB positions on federal issues will be presented to the American Farm Bureau Federation for adoption into their national policy.  Over 270 delegates participated in Saturday’s meeting in Indianapolis.[audio:https://www.hoosieragtoday.com//wp-content/uploads//2012/08/taxwrap.mp3|titles=Taxes Top Priority for Indiana Farm Bureau]Audio Playerhttps://media.blubrry.com/hoosieragtoday/p/www.hoosieragtoday.com//wp-content/uploads//2012/08/taxwrap.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Podcast: Play in new window | Download | EmbedSubscribe: RSS SHARE Taxes Top Priority for Indiana Farm Bureau SHARE Facebook Twitter Home News Feed Taxes Top Priority for Indiana Farm Bureau Facebook Twitter By Gary Truitt – Aug 27, 2012 Previous articleTwo Percent of Indiana Corn HarvestedNext articleWorkshops will help Landowners Earn Income, Conserve Land Gary Truittlast_img read more

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Seed Consultants 3/20/2013 Market Closing with Gary Wilhelmi

first_img Previous articleISDA Director takes Message Home on Ag DayNext articleBig Oil’s Big Stall Hoosier Ag Today SHARE Home Indiana Agriculture News Seed Consultants 3/20/2013 Market Closing with Gary Wilhelmi SHARE Seed Consultants 3/20/2013 Market Closing with Gary Wilhelmi By Hoosier Ag Today – Mar 20, 2013 Facebook Twitter FinancialDow hits new high then backs up to close at 14,511 up 56S&P 1559 up 12 close to the high as was NADAQ up 25 at 3254Fed makes no changes and sees a slow growth period aheadRussia is closing in on Cyprus with an eye on their resources and maybe the establishment of a naval base.I spent a few years studying Russian history and they don’t changes their waysWTI crude up $ .80Gold off $6Dollar down 27 at 82.83Fed Ex falls 7% after weak international earningsLivestockShort covering in April cattle up $ .87 and April hogs $.35 higherBoxed beef has raised $10 in the last few weeks while cash cattle have lost $3Premium of futures to cash is a drag on hogsIowa-Minnesota hog’s weights are about steady at 277 #Grain and soybeansWheat and beans close $ .14 higher and nearby corn up $ .4Export Sales Thursday: last week wheat was near 1 MT, while corn remained weak and soybeans slippedChina cancelled 10-12 MT of Brazilian soybean purchases but transference to US products cannot be assumedGulf bean just are just steady and that is a warming signBrazilian beans are cheaper and the crop will get shippedCold and dry out 6-10 days in the HRW countryAnother storm is brewing in the meantime so let’s see where it goesReports next week in plantings and stocks with corn acres guessed at 97 m and soybeans 78In the stocks 5 b corn and 940 m beans as of 3-110:32 updateApril cattle off $.47 and hogs down $ .50 at new lowsHog futures premium to cash adds pressureMay corn off $.1 and wheat up $.7Gulf soybeans steady at 65 cents over the May as is corn at 3 lowerLess expensive Brazilian beans weigh on basis10:14 updateFed has been main driver in stock market advance with policy statement at 1 PM CDTDow up 77 at 14,533 with high at 14,544Light volume in Ag marketsMeats steady and grains a shade betterMarket OpeningFinancialCypriot parliament rejects bail out and Russian are lurkingRussian nationals have large amounts of capital in Cyprus and also have interest in their uncertain fuel resourcesA major Russian oil company also has involvement in Mozambique oil, so watch them as they have money and ambitionFed Ex earnings fall short of target due to international softnessFed policy statement at 1 PM expected to be unchanged, but watch for hints of winding down of asset purchasesWTI $92.95 up $ .79Brent crude $108.40 up $ .95Gold $1607 down $4Dollar index 82.78 off 20More talk of Chinese economic vulnerabilityLivestockLight cattle trade at $125 off $2Boxed beef down $1.66 on choice but up $10 versus a week ago as cash has fallen $3Cash breakeven is around $140Pork cutout on 75 loads, carcass down $1.14, loins $4.80 lower and hams off $.40Early Easter ham shank at $.78 and whole hams at $.98 are offered along with $6.99 salmon fillets, $7.99 choice standing ribSupport under the liquidating cattle market is at $122Hogs at their lowGrain and soybeansOld crop new crop spreads keys to reading markets ahead of next weeks reportAcres 97 m corn and 78 m beans also more wheatCorn 3-1 stocks 5 B and soybeans 940 mInterior basis firms in tightly supplied cornColder than normal and dry with a storm comingExport sales Thursday has been good in wheat, poor corn and slipping in beansS American maturing weather has been idealHigh dollar has crimped exportsDon’t pay too much attention to market commentators as they talk out of their positionsOn the trading floors I was besieged by brokers who were arguing for their position thinking I could sway the trade, and that was nonsense Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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Ethanol Industry Divided on EPA Ruling, Mulling Next Steps

first_imgAmerican Coalition for Ethanol (ACE) Executive Vice President Brian Jennings says the final rule protects the oil industry from meeting the requirements that Congress intended. “When Congress enacted the Renewable Fuel Standard, it voted to side with those of us who said ‘yes we can’ reduce greenhouse gas emissions from motor fuel, ‘yes we can’ allow consumer access to E15 and flex fuels, and ‘yes we can’ spark innovative ways to produce cleaner fuels,” said Jennings. “While we appreciate that the Administration made incremental improvements compared to the proposed RFS rule, unfortunately, today they are choosing to side with those who say ‘no, we can’t’. Regrettably, EPA’s final RFS rule protects the old way of doing business by obstructing consumer access to cleaner fuels, stifling competition in the marketplace, and undermining innovation.” Tom Buis, with Growth Energy, downplayed the possibility of a lawsuit against the EPA, but Dinneen says legal action is likely. “What EPA has done here is a dramatic departure from a program that was working,” he said. “I believe when we finish our review of the final rule that we will want to stand up for the program, stand up for consumers, stand up for carbon reduction, stand up for rural America , and put this program back where it belongs.” Ethanol Industry Divided on EPA Ruling, Mulling Next Steps SHARE Iowa Renewable Fuels Association (IRFA) Executive Director Monte Shaw says the final rule is a blow to farmers and fuel choice for consumers. “Given EPA’s stated rationale for these numbers, one of the most successful energy policies in our nation’s history has been put squarely in the stranglehold of the petroleum industry,” said Shaw. “As a result, consumers will see higher prices at the pump, and Iowa farmers will likely continue to see commodity prices below the cost of production.” Nebraska Ethanol Board administrator Todd Sneller, who is also chairman of the Clean Fuels Development Coalition, called the final rule “disappointing, but not unexpected” and said it means biofuels must move beyond government imposed limits and establish new value based on performance and environmental benefits. Previous articleHighway Funding Bill Includes Crop Insurance FixNext articleMorning Outlook Gary Truitt SHAREcenter_img Ethanol Industry Divided on EPA Ruling, Mulling Next StepsBob Dinneen,Not everyone in the ethanol industry was happy with the EPA ruling released on Monday. Some groups are considering court action against the EPA.The initial reaction by many in the agriculture and ethanol sectors to Monday’s  announcement by the EPA, that it would increase slightly the level of ethanol that can be blended into the nation’s fuel supply, was mildly enthusiastic.  But the fact that the levels are still short of what Congress intended in the Renewable Fuels Standard makes the ruling meaningless, said  Bob Dinneen, with the Renewable Fuels Association. He said the EPA still left the oil companies in charge of how much ethanol to use, “They still reduced the numbers from the statutory levels and embraced the notion of the blend wall … they are effectively turning the nation’s renewable energy program over to the oil companies.” Home Indiana Agriculture News Ethanol Industry Divided on EPA Ruling, Mulling Next Steps Facebook Twitter Facebook Twitter By Gary Truitt – Dec 1, 2015 last_img read more

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Senate Report Shows EPA Enforcing WOTUS Rules Despite Court Injunction

first_imgHome Indiana Agriculture News Senate Report Shows EPA Enforcing WOTUS Rules Despite Court Injunction Facebook Twitter By Hoosier Ag Today – Sep 20, 2016 The American Farm Bureau Federation says Tuesday’s Senate report on the Clean Water Act proves the need for the Senate to act against the Waters of the U.S. rule. Farm Bureau President Zippy Duvall says the case studies presented in the report reflect “the serious concerns” Farm Bureau has raised over the last two years. The Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works released the report this week that Farm Bureau says exposes “reckless and unlawful actions in enforcing the Clean Water Act.” Farm Bureau alleges the Environmental Protection Agency and the Army Corps of Engineers have unlawfully stretched the limited authority Congress gave the agencies. Specifically, AFBF says, through the Clean Water Act, the federal agencies have regulated ordinary plowing, a normal farming activity exempted by Congress, and claimed authority to regulate tire ruts and puddles found on the farm.Duvall says the report shows the Senate should reconsider the measure to stop the Waters of the U.S. rule “at its earliest opportunity.” Scott Yager, Environmental Counsel with the NCBA, says this report will put pressure on Congress to pass legislation that would put an end to WOTUS.Source: NAFB News Service Previous articleFarm Groups Cautious of Merger Trend at Senate HearingNext articleSoybeans will be Silver Lining in 2016 Hoosier Ag Today SHARE Senate Report Shows EPA Enforcing WOTUS Rules Despite Court Injunction Facebook Twitter SHARElast_img read more

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U.S. Ethanol Production Hits 15 Week Low

first_imgHome Energy U.S. Ethanol Production Hits 15 Week Low U.S. Ethanol Production Hits 15 Week Low SHARE Facebook Twitter Previous articleLicensed Grain Facilities Can Apply for Temporary or Emergency StorageNext articleEducation Key to Understanding FAA Drone Regulations Gary Truitt Facebook Twitter By Gary Truitt – Oct 13, 2016 According to EIA data analyzed by the Renewable Fuels Association, ethanol production averaged 962,000 barrels per day (b/d)—or 40.40 million gallons daily. That is down 18,000 b/d from the week before and tied for the lowest total in 16 weeks. The four-week average for ethanol production stood at 978,000 b/d for an annualized rate of 14.99 billion gallons.Stocks of ethanol stood at 19.4 million barrels. That is a 3.9% decrease from last week and the lowest total since the week ended 11/13/2015.Imports of ethanol remained flat at zero b/d for the seventh week in a row.Gasoline demand for the week averaged 389.1 million gallons (9.264 million barrels) daily. Refiner/blender input of ethanol averaged 916,000 b/d.Expressed as a percentage of daily gasoline demand, daily ethanol production was 10.38%. SHARElast_img read more

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RFA: EPA Must Allow RIN Markets to Work

first_img Facebook Twitter RFA: EPA Must Allow RIN Markets to Work Home Energy RFA: EPA Must Allow RIN Markets to Work Previous articleFirst Farmers Bank & Trust to Open New BranchesNext articleEU to Buy More Soybeans from US After Deal Made Hoosier Ag Today Facebook Twitter The most effective way to reduce the prices American consumers are paying at the pump is to let Renewable Identification Numbers (RINs) do the job they were intended to do by stimulating increased ethanol production and blending, the Renewable Fuels Association wrote in a letter to House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Environment Chairman John Shimkus (R-Ill.) and Ranking Member Paul Tonko (D-N.Y.).The subcommittee held a hearing yesterday morning on RINs, which are used to demonstrate compliance with annual Renewable Fuel Standard blending obligations.“RIN credits are the engine that drives the RFS. Not only are RINs used to demonstrate compliance with annual RFS blending obligations, but they also serve as a critical economic incentive to expand the production and use of renewable fuels,” RFA explained to the lawmakers. “Studies show that higher RIN prices facilitate deeper discounting of ethanol-blended fuels (such as E15 and E85) relative to gasoline, and that wider discounts lead to greater consumption of these blends. In turn, greater demand for E15 and E85 stimulates increased production of ethanol, which leads to increased RIN generation and larger supplies,” the letter noted.Contrary to the rhetoric coming from some in the refining industry, RINs aren’t negatively affecting the financial performance of refining companies, since merchant refiners who do not blend ethanol recoup their RIN costs by slightly marking up their selling price of gasoline blendstock, RFA explained to the lawmakers. Multiple economists and outside experts have testified to this fact.Additionally, “there is no evidence to support the notion that RINs push retail gas prices higher. In fact, RINs and retail E10 gas prices tend to be negatively correlated, with periods of high gas prices occurring during periods of low RIN prices and vice versa,” RFA explained.EPA’s recent issuance of approximately 50 small refinery compliance exemptions from 2016 and 2017 RFS requirements has increased RIN stocks to nearly 3.1 billion RINs—more than double the level of RIN stocks just two years ago, RFA explained in its letter. As a consequence, RIN prices have dropped from 95 cents in late November 2017 to just 25 cents today, decreasing the incentive for blenders and refiners to increase volumes of E15 and other higher-level ethanol blends.These small refiner waivers have destroyed demand for ethanol, RFA wrote. “Despite very favorable blending economics (i.e., ethanol is priced 70 cents per gallon below gasoline at the wholesale level), ethanol blending activity has slowed in 2018….The 2018 weekly ethanol blend rate has been below year-ago levels in 21 of 28 weeks so far. Meanwhile absolute blending volumes have lagged year-ago volumes in 18 of 28 weeks, including 16 of the past 20 weeks,” RFA explained.“U.S. ethanol producers and farmers across the country who have invested in this important value-added market opportunity are extraordinarily concerned by EPA’s recent intrusion into the RIN market, and believe it irreparably undermines the integrity of the Renewable Fuels Standard,” RFA wrote. “Providing waivers from RIN obligations to wealthy oil companies that are recovering RIN costs in the crack spread, creating new RINs not tied to a specific gallon of biofuel to accommodate the retroactive granting of a small refinery waiver, and forgiving the RIN obligations of a certain refinery in bankruptcy proceedings when the source of that refinery’s financial distress was well understood to be unrelated to its RFS obligations are all examples of EPA’s wanton disregard for the statute and its biofuel demand destruction campaign. All of this must end. EPA must allow RIN markets to work,” RFA concluded.A copy of RFA’s letter to the lawmakers is here.Source: The Renewable Fuels Association SHARE By Hoosier Ag Today – Jul 25, 2018 SHARElast_img read more

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Fernandez Receives Extension Director’s Award

first_imgHome Indiana Agriculture News Fernandez Receives Extension Director’s Award SHARE Fernandez Receives Extension Director’s Award SHARE By Hoosier Ag Today – Dec 10, 2018 More than 350 Purdue Extension educators and extension specialists gathered at the Purdue Memorial Union for the annual Professional Development Conference, an event that recognizes individuals for outstanding service and offers educational and collaborative opportunities.Jason Henderson, director of Extension and associate dean of Purdue Agriculture, welcomed guests and recognized several individuals for their achievements, including Marcos Fernandez, associate dean and director of academic programs and professor of animal sciences. Henderson presented Fernandez with the 2018 Director’s Award.“Marcos is tremendously supportive of Extension,” Henderson said. “From day one, he has sought to strengthen the integration of academic programs and Extension, to the point of investing in our summer internship program. Personally, I am deeply appreciative of his vision, leadership, counsel, and passion for education and agriculture.”Angie Abbott, associate director of Purdue Extension and program leader for Health and Human Sciences Extension, presented the Paul B. Crooks Award to Carla Kidwell, director of Purdue Extension Warrick County. Kidwell’s advocacy of healthy living programs led the first group of Indiana 4-H teens to deliver health programming to the residents of Warrick County. Her effort garnered national recognition, sending her to the national 4-H Healthy Living Summit in Washington, D.C.Renée McKee, program leader for Indiana 4-H Youth Development and assistant director of Purdue Extension, said Kidwell has been a driving force in Indiana 4-H for nearly 30 years.“We are all so grateful for Carla’s ongoing, devoted service,” McKee said. “Her success shines through her dedication, leadership and innovative methods of teaching and instruction, which have benefitted so many.”The Outstanding Extension Faculty/Specialist Award was given to Amanda Deering, clinical assistant professor with Purdue Extension and specialist in Produce Food Safety, who many refer to as the “go-anywhere specialist” for her work locally and globally. Deering’s tireless efforts were particularly invaluable after the Indiana cantaloupe illness outbreak in 2013, educating growers and assisting them with potential FDA inspections. After this, she helped secure funding for the Food Safety Education Hub, currently under construction near Vincennes.Awards were presented to numerous individuals for their significant contributions, including the areas of Indiana Extension Educators Association (IEEA) and Purdue University Cooperative Extension Specialists Association (PUCESA) awards.Kara Stewart, assistant professor of animal sciences and PUCESA chair, announced the following awards:Hancook: Barb Beaulieu and educators.Team: CCA Crop Conference Planning Committee.Early Career: John Orick.Mid-Career: Maria Marshall.Career: Larry DeBoer and Keith Johnson.Spirit of Extension: Barry Fisher.Student in Extension: Brooke Stefancik.Leadership: Tamara Benjamin.Melessa Wiesehan, Indiana 4-H Youth Development educator for Purdue Extension – Jennings County and IEEA chair, presented the following awards:Friend of Extension: Wayne and Janice Robinson, Elkhart County.4-H Youth Development Bob Amick: Robert Kelly, Elkhart County.4-H Youth Development Individual: Rebecca Wilkins, Harrison County.Agriculture and Natural Resources (ANR) Individual: Elysia Rodgers, Dekalb County.Community Wellness Coordinator (CWC) Individual: Mindy Duckett, Hendricks, Putnam and Parke counties.HHS Individual: Molly Hunt, Delaware County.International: Cultural Immersion Team, Ikaria, Greece and the program, “Lessons from Ikaria, Greece” with team members Jean Akers, Naomi Bechtold, Meagan Brothers, Jennifer Cannon, Molly Hoag, Jane Horner, Kelsie Muller, Demarcus Sneed, Christina Bautista Swathwood and Stephanie Woodcox.4-H Youth Development Team: Teri Hornberger and Elisabeth SmithANR Team: Indiana Small Farm Conference Committee with team members Ashley Adair, Roy Ballard, Tamara Benjamin, Kamille Brawner, Phil Cox, Jodee Ellett, Steve Engleking, Sarah Hanson, John Hawley, Karen Mitchell, Michael O’Donnell, Tiffanie Stone, Amy Thompson, Emily Toner, Andrew Westfall, and James Wolff. Former members include Mark Kepler, Paul Ebner, Mike Hornbach and Corinne Alexander.Community Development Team: Beginner’s Guide to Grant Writing with team members Jennifer Allen, Gina Anderson, Naomi Bechtold, Jennifer Cannon, Roberta Crabtree, Curt Emanuel, Christina Ferroli, Mary Foell, Melinda Grismer, Vickie Hadley, Karen Hinshaw, Teri Hornberger, Patty Keating, Annette Lawler, Terri Newcom, George Okantey, Kris Parker, Janet Reed, Katie Whiteford, and Steve Yoder.CWC Team: Animal Science Day Camp with team members Mary Ann Lienhart-Cross, Kelly Heckaman, and Robert Kelly.HHS Team: Master Food Preserver with team members: Harriet Armstrong, Linda Curley, Brenda Hagedorn, Jane Horner, Nancy Hudson, Annette Lawler, Joni Muchler, Monica Nagele, Karen Ritchey, Atina Rozhon, and Janet Steffens.Years of Service Awards also were given to individuals with 10, 25, 30 and 45 years working with Extension. Curtis Campbell, Hans Schmitz, and Andrew Westfall were recognized for 10 years of service; Eugene Matzat, Davis Osborne, and Denise Schroeder for 25 years of service; Julie Gray for 30 years of service; and Polly Gettinger for 45 years of service.Source: Purdue Ag News Facebook Twitter Facebook Twitter Previous articleFarm Bill Passage This WeekNext articleFormer Ag Secretary Bergland Passes Hoosier Ag Todaylast_img read more

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White House Adviser Working on Biofuel Mandate Plan

first_img White House Adviser Working on Biofuel Mandate Plan SHARE By NAFB News Service – Dec 7, 2019 Previous articleBurnin’ the Bean- Happenings in DC and Elsewhere in Ag This WeekNext articleImpeachment Trumps all the Clamoring for USMCA NAFB News Service Facebook Twitter White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow is working on improving the Trump administration’s plan for bolstering biofuel requirements.Bloomberg says the move comes after ethanol boosters in politically important farm states said the current proposal doesn’t compensate for waivers that exempt some small refineries from the mandates under the Renewable Fuels Standard.Biofuel producers, corn farmers, and Midwest political leaders blasted the Environmental Protection Agency’s current approach to biofuels as inadequate. They say the EPA mandates completely ignored the terms of an agreement reached on October 1st to raise biofuel blending requirements enough to fully offset refinery exemptions.Senator Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) says the EPA could have the best of intentions but “farmers don’t believe it” because of the agency’s track record.Oil industry leaders say the EPA’s current proposal is illegal, arguing that it would unfairly force the larger refineries to bear a higher burden of biofuel-blending requirements. EPA is currently reviewing public comments as it prepares a final rule that will set the 2020 biofuel quotas.Kudlow’s work could lead to changes in the final rule that would ensure the final measure is more in line with what Trump gave approved in negotiations that led to the October 1st agreement. Facebook Twitter Home Indiana Agriculture News White House Adviser Working on Biofuel Mandate Plan SHARElast_img read more

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NCBA Rolls Out New Event for 2021

first_img Facebook Twitter The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association Wednesday announced the 2021 Cattle Industry Convention Winter Reboot. Planned for February 23-24, the event allows the organization to come together for industry news, updates, education and networking.NCBA says Winter Reboot attendees will receive a sneak peek into plans for the Cattle Industry Convention and the Cattlemen’s College, moved to August of this year due to COVID-19 restrictions.NCBA CEO Colin Woodall says, “This virtual experience will provide vital industry updates and education as we start the New Year.”Winter Reboot sessions include an NCBA Washington, D.C. issues update and expectations with the new administration. Ten educational programs will be offered covering topics such as sustainability, as well as a tech tool introduction. A virtual marketplace will also be featured during the Winter Reboot to allow attendees interaction with leading agribusinesses.Registration for the Winter Reboot is now open, and details about the event can be found at convention.ncba.org/winter-reboot. SHARE NCBA Rolls Out New Event for 2021 Facebook Twitter Previous articlePurdue Extension Offers Virtual Inheriting Farmland WorkshopNext articleHeightened COVID-Related Measures Slow Product Movement Into China NAFB News Service Home Indiana Agriculture News NCBA Rolls Out New Event for 2021 By NAFB News Service – Jan 7, 2021 SHARElast_img read more

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TCU battles through injuries, wins Shawn Robinson’s first game as starting quarterback against Texas Tech , 27-3

first_imgBoschini: ‘None of the talk matters because Jamie Dixon is staying’ Garrett Podellhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/garrett-podell/ Boschini talks: construction, parking, tuition, enrollment, DEI, a student trustee Garrett Podellhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/garrett-podell/ ReddIt printMissing its starting QB (Kenny Hill), both starting LBs (Travin Howard, Montrel Wilson), starting free safety (Niko Small), starting kicker (Jonathan Song), and true freshman quarterback Shawn Robinson making his first start.The Horned Frogs shut down Texas Tech’s high-flying offense and the Robinson’s offense put up enough point to defeat the Red Raiders, 27-3. Although games aren’t decided after each team’s first possession, it sure felt that way. The Red Raiders opening drive lasted 21 plays, gaining 70 yards, and TTU head coach Kliff Kingsbury burned his first two timeouts. However, the Red Raiders had to settle for three on a 20-yard field goal by kicker Clayton Hatfield because their passing attack faltered in the red zone. Red Raider quarterback Nic Shimonek completed seven of his first nine passes for 42 yards, seemingly completing five-yard outs and slants every which way, but Patterson’s defense forced Shimonek outside the pocket and broke up a pass in the end zone on a critical down.Next, it was freshman Shawn Robinson’s debut as TCU’s starting quarterback. He only completed one pass for two yards, but the running game was a different story. The DeSoto product was lethal on the ground, gaining 68 yards on four carries including a 41-yard gain on a first-and-25 after a holding penalty.Horned Frog wide receiver capped off TCU’s first possession with a KaVontae Turpin two-yard rushing touchdown on a misdirection wide receiver reverse after Robinson faked a handoff up the middle to running back Kyle Hicks.“It was cool to see him get success right away,” TCU center Austin Schlottmann said. “It was pretty important for us to run the ball because it takes pressure off of him, and him having the ability to run helps.”Robinson became the first true freshman to start at quarterback in the 17 seasons Gary Patterson has been head coach. The last true freshman to start at quarterback for TCU was Casey Printers Sept. 25, 1999, at Arkansas State, a 24-21 Horned Frogs’ win. Patterson was in his second year as TCU’s defensive coordinator.He finished the game with 169 total yards and a touchdown pass, and the freshman led TCU in rushing with 113 yards on ten carries.“We won it with a freshman quarterback, he’s got a lot to learn, but he did a nice job,” TCU head coach Gary Patterson said. Kicker Cole Bunce lined up for the first field goal attempt of his career from 43 yards out, and he drilled it right up the middle to give TCU a seven-point lead, 10-3, with 1:14 left in the first half.The 43-yard field goal was the longest make of the season by a Horned Frog, and it occurred on Bunce’s first collegiate attempt.After Texas Tech opened the game going three-for-five on third down, TCU stopped the Red Raiders on their last seven third downs of the first half.With 7:11 left in the third quarter, Horned Frogs had the ball on their own 20. A couple plays later, the ball  was on the ground after Tech defensive back Justus Parker punched the ball out of Robinson’s hands on an option keeper, and the Red Raiders recovered for the first turnover of the day. Three plays later, the Red Raiders lined up to attempt a 20-yard field and then this happened. Linkedin Garrett Podellhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/garrett-podell/ ReddIt TCU baseball finds their biggest fan just by saying hello Garrett is a Journalism and Sports Broadcasting double major. He is the Managing Editor for TCU360, and his passions are God, family, friends, sports, and great food. Previous articleTCU students participate in LEAPS day of serviceNext articleHoroscope: November 20, 2017 Garrett Podell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR + posts TCU quarterback Shawn Robinson runs the ball against Texas Tech. (Photo courtesy of GoFrogs.com)center_img Twitter Men’s basketball scores season-low in NIT semifinals loss to Texas Listen: The Podell and Pickell Show with L.J. Collier After Hatfield and the Red Raiders were stopped short by the TCU to come away with points on a drive that started at the TCU six, Robinson and TCU would put the game away.“That was huge,” TCU linebacker Ty Summers said. “We just trying to show Shawn that it’s ok, we’re here for you, and that whenever you fall, we’re going to pick you back up.”TCU running back Kyle Hicks said that stand change the game.“That was big for offense because previously we’ve had some struggles,” Hicks said. “After the defense got that stop and we marched down the field and scored, that was a big turnaround for the offense and our football team.”Early in the fourth quarter, Texas Tech was within striking distance once again with the ball on the TCU 30; however, the Horned Frogs evened the turnover battle after TCU linebacker Sammy Douglas jarred the ball loose from Shimonek on a scramble with 13:50 left in the game.After the fumble, the Horned Frogs utilized 12 plays to cover 78 yards and extend their lead to 17, 20-3, after Bunce nailed his second field goal of the day from 25 yards out.“Besides the kick out of bounds, I thought knucklehead [Cole Bunce] did a great job,” Patterson said affectionally. “He kicked field goals the way we needed to.”On the Red Raiders next possession, the TCU defense got on the scoreboard. After Tech reached the Horned Frog 11, Shimonek threw toward the left sideline, and Horned Frog cornerback Jeff Gladney ripped the ball away from Tech wide receiver Dylan Cantrell to run it all the way back 93 yards for a touchdown. The score increased the Horned Frog cushion to 24, 27-3, with 4:39 left to play.“Turnovers are huge because it’s just a complete swing in momentum,” Summers said. “When we had that, especially it gives our offense confidence knowing they can go out there and try to get big plays and force plays for big yardage because they know if we fail, we have there backs to get the ball back to them to give them another chance.”Patterson’s defense has now held its last five opponents dating back to Kansas scoreless in the second half.“First drive, we were in a four-man front on the defensive line, and then I switched to a three-man front,” Patterson said.  “The biggest thing is Texas Tech spreads things out, three-man front doesn’t look like you have as many people in the box, but you get as many people and you have more coverage people on the wideouts, especially the way we change coverages. The kids did a great job of that today.”Up NextThe Horned Frogs are now one win away from an appearance in the Big 12 Championship Game at AT&T Stadium Dec. 2. There’s just one thing standing in their way: its I-35 rivals from Waco, the Baylor Bears.“It’s really meaningful to have the opportunity,” Hicks said. “That’s one of our goals we set out to do this year is play in the Big 12 Championship game. That job is not done yet. We have to go out there on Friday and take care of business.”TCU hosts Baylor in its regular season finale Friday Nov. 24 at Amon G. Carter Stadium. Kickoff is set for 11 a.m. Linkedin Garrett Podellhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/garrett-podell/ Facebook Another series win lands TCU Baseball in the top 5, earns Sikes conference award TCU rowing program strengthens after facing COVID-19 setbacks Facebook Twitter Garrett Podell last_img read more

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