The Gold Coast is glittering again

first_imgAfter languishing behind the major cities for years, something is up on the Gold Coast – house prices.In their June report, nationwide property valuers Herron Todd White found, “the Gold Coast has put the GFC behind it with a recovering market.“Prices are well off the bottom across all residential property categories and land values on the Gold Coast are reported to have increased by 10.7% over the past year.”So what is driving the renaissance?According to HTW, the economic mix has largely turned in the Gold Coast’s favour, led by higher population growth.All of these new residents had to find a home somewhere, but residential construction had come a near complete halt during the GFC. As the population continued to grow, the surplus of housing stock was soaked up, sparking a rebound in prices.Tourism, a key employer and money generator, is also on the rebound thanks to a falling dollar making Aussie holidays cheaper for overseas and local tourists alike.Gold Coast tourism is on the rebound thanks to a falling Aussie dollar.Villa units in Palm Beach sell for about $500,000 – $600,000.To find out more about the revival and where the best deals are for home buyers, we spoke with Lucy Cole of Lucy Cole Prestige a key player in the local market for 20 years.“We certainly weathered a drop off during the GFC, but the winning of the Commonwealth Games and the building of much needed infrastructure, like the Gold-LinQ tram, has sparked a revival,” she says.“There has also been a surge in interest from buyers from Singapore, New Zealand and China which has helped move the market up.”What to buy – first home buyersFor first time buyers with a typical budget of $500,000 – $600,000, Cole suggests looking beyond the central areas of the coast as this market has already moved ahead strongly.“With this sort of budget, buyers wanting a three-bedroom family home should look in areas like Nerang and Pacific Pines.“The other option would be to head south towards an area like Palm Beach where you should be able to find a nice villa for this budget.”What to buy – up to $1 millionAstute buyers can find an apartment for $1 million in Broadbeach.More from news02:37Purchasers snap up every residence in the $40 million Siarn Palm Beach North12 hours ago02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa1 day agoFor those with a more solid budget, Cole sees good opportunities for the astute home buyer.“An example of what to look for is an apartment we sold recently for $850,000 in the Sentinel Building which had 178 sqm of living space.“At around a million dollars, good apartments do pop up in quality buildings in areas like Broadbeach, Main Beach or a little back from the main strip in Surfers Paradise.“At this price you should be aiming for two-bedroom, two-bath unit with 90 -120 sqm of living and beach views and typically these come with cars spaces and lock up storage.The market has a history of bursts of activity followed by flat periods.“The other option in this range is to look at an older style house a little back from the main centres in areas like Benowa. These will usually require work to be brought up to a reasonable level of presentation, but we do see houses in excellent positions come on to the market from time to time.”Buyers new to south east Queensland should be conscious that this market does have a history of bursts of activity followed by flat periods.But buyers who tap into local knowledge and are rigorous in property selection can be well rewarded by the right home on the Gold Coast.last_img read more

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UK considering national investment vehicle for LGPS

first_imgThe launch of a single national investment vehicle for nearly 90 local authority funds in England and Wales is one of three cost-saving measures being examined by the UK government.According to a tender launched by the Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG) earlier this month, it is seeking to hire an actuarial or investment consultancy to offer a “robust analysis of the costs and benefits associated with structural reform” of the Local Government Pension Schemes (LGPS).Noting the £500m (€590m) annually spent by the funds on asset management and administration, the department said the study would examine the benefits of a single investment vehicle for all LGPS in the region.It will also look at two further options – launching several vehicles with “closely aligned” investment approaches, or the potential for merging the existing funds with each other. It follows a recently concluded consultation on the future shape of the pillar in which DCLG made clear it was not “wedded” to the current number of funds – 89 in England and Wales.In the tender notice, DCLG added: “Building on this initial call for evidence, the Cabinet Office and the Department for Communities and Local Government would like to commission further advice to explore the savings that might be realised by collaboration.“The purpose of this research is to provide government with robust analysis of the costs and benefits associated with structural reform of the Local Government Pension Scheme, to develop a roadmap to implementation and to consider how that reform might be applied to other funded public service pension arrangements.”The tender is now closed to applicants.Welsh local authorities have previously considered pooling assets in a single investment vehicle, and a similar approach was also proposed by the Wandsworth Borough Council Pension Fund.Several neighbouring local authorities in England have, meanwhile, considered merging their pension funds, although the proposal was made as part of an overall merger of the three councils.last_img read more

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Registration limited for free Fetal Alcohol Syndrome program

first_imgBatesville, In. — The director of the Indiana National Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, Susan Elsworth will hold a free presentation Thursday, May 30 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Ivy Tech in Batesville. The seminar includes information about parts of the brain that may be affected and suggested positive intervention.Registration is now available for up to 30 participants by emailing ocof@onecommunityonefamily.org or call 812-932-1026.The program is sponsored by One Community One Family, the Coalition for a Drug-Free Batesville, choices Collaborated Care Solutions, United Families, the Indiana Family Social Services Administration and the United Way of Greater Cincinnati. Continuing education credits are available.last_img

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Supporters Celebrate President Trump’s Birthday with Rallies

first_imgYet another group, known as “Palm Beach Indivisibles,” has organized a “Caravan for Racial Justice” beginning at 11:30 a.m. at Dreher Park in West Palm Beach.An online flyer for the event states, “It’s Flag Day & a certain President’s birthday. Many of our brothers and sisters will never see another flag wave or birthday… Join us to send a positive message for JUSTICE.”Meanwhile, supporters for former Vice President, now Democrat nominee, Joe Biden, are also planning to support for their candidate.Biden supporters are set to meet across different locations in South Florida, including one in West Palm Beach, and then will drive past Trump properties.All of the participants are encouraged to adhere to CDC guidelines on social distancing, and will follow all state and local traffic laws. Sunday is President Trump’s 74th birthday, as well as National Flag Day, and several groups will be celebrating and showing their support with rallies across Florida.“Boaters for Trump” have organized a boat parade that will begin at the Square Grouper Tiki Bar in Jupiter and head down the Intracoastal Waterway to the Southern Boulevard bridge and back.In addition, a group called “Trucks for Trump” gathered at Pirate’s Well Restaurant & Bar in Lake Park at 10 a.m. with plans to caravan to Southern Boulevard, then return to the restaurant for an after party.Motorcyclists with “Bikers for Trump” are meeting at the Cracker Barrel in Stuart and following the trucks to Southern Boulevard, then gathering at the Harley-Davidson store on 45th Street in West Palm Beach for an after party.last_img read more

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Other Sports Pro Kabaddi League 2019 to be held from July 19 to October 9

first_img For all the Latest Sports News News, Other Sports News, Download News Nation Android and iOS Mobile Apps. Mumbai: The seventh season of Pro Kabaddi League (PKL) will be held from July 19 to October 9, an official said on Monday. Conceding that there was a dip in season 6 viewership, PKL commissioner Anupam Goswami cited the change in the league window as the main reason as it coincided with the festival season. “We have gone back to the original window of July in season 7 after season 6 commenced in October 2018.”We will have the next season in 2020 also in July,” Goswami said here, prior to the auction featuring 441 players from 13 countries.    The auction features 388 Indian and 53 overseas players. Each of the twelve franchise teams has a purse of Rs 4.4 crore to spend at the auction after deducting from the salaries of retained players.RELATED    Goswami said while there had been an increase of 15 per cent in the scoring of points between season 5 and 6, the defenders had also tackled better with an increase of 21 percent tackles between the last two seasons. The seventh edition of Pro Kabaddi League will begin on July 19.The sixth edition was held in October 2018.The PKL Auction will feature 388 Indian and 53 overseas players.center_img highlightslast_img read more

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Scorpions script dramatic 7-run win over defending Champs

first_img–Chanderpaul lauds team batting spirit despite narrow lossBy Clifton Ross IT was a dramatic end to an early morning of action as Jamaica Scorpions bowled their way to one of the most upsetting, yet courageous wins, over defending champs Guyana Jaguars who lost their way by a mere 7 runs.The Final day at Providence was mixed with emotions after Guyana were left clinging on for dear life at 155-9 when day 3 ended, with Anthony Bramble ending innings number 2 as the top-scorer with 32.The home team failed to pull off what would have been a daring heist, being restricted to 174 all out in their second innings; thanks in part to the failures of their top and middle-order batsmen.The instrument of the Jaguars demise was the lanky debutant spinner and Man-of-the-match, Peat Salmon, who grabbed 7-57, all of which came in the latter half of the penultimate day.It was a rather heroic effort from the last pair of Veerasammy Permaul and Keon Joseph, who, for the last session of day 3 and the hour of play on the final day, provided the most entertainment.Permaul scored a defiant 28 from 101 balls with 2 fours while the pacer, Joseph, showed application and grit for a number 11 as he chipped in with 11, batting for hours in an attempt to rescue the champs.The pair survived a number of scares but remained firm throughout the hard times. Both batsmen were keen to negate deliveries and deny possible wicket-costing runs, which in the end might have been another reason they came up short.After no inroads were made by Salmon and company on day 4, the wearing of the ball made way for the introduction of seamer Derval Green (1-14) who put the final nail in the coffin two delivers into his first over.The celebrations were taken to the dressing room where the last placed team celebrate beating the defending champions and table-leaders in their own back-yard, to possibly get their momentum going this season.The last wicket stand of 49 was crucial to the Jags response and following the match, batting coach Shivnarine Chanderpaul told Chronicle Sports that he was proud of the effort as it showed the Champs are slowly becoming an 11-man team capable of producing runs down to the last batter.Guyana will now fix their attention on the Windward Volcanoes who they face in the next round.last_img read more

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Opponent preview: What to know about Penn State

first_imgSyracuse (4-2, 0-1 Atlantic Coast) and Penn State (5-1) will close out its week at the NIT Season Tip-Off at 7 p.m. on Friday. Both teams lost their first game in the Barclays Center on Wednesday night. The Nittany Lions blew a 16-point halftime lead in a close loss to Ole Miss while the Orange lost by 14 to Oklahoma State. Below is what to know about Penn State ahead of the matchup.All-time series: Syracuse leads, 62-43Last time they played: This will be the first time the Orange have played the Nittany Lions since 1982. Syracuse won that meeting 69-68 and was led by Erich Santifer, who scored 16 points. The Penn State report: The Nittany Lions are a top-3o team in defensive efficiency per KenPom.com, and have only allowed more than 70 points once this season (against Ole Miss). The Nittany Lions have played mainly a seven or eight-man rotation thus far through the season and don’t have a player taller than 6-foot-9 on the roster. Still, Penn State will look to attack the basket often. Senior forward Lamar Stevens is averaging nearly a double-double with 17.7 points and 8.2 rebounds per game. Mike Watkins, a senior forward, stands one inch taller than Stevens at 6-foot-9 and averages 11.3 points and 8 rebounds per game. AdvertisementThis is placeholder textHow Syracuse beats OSU: For the Nittany Lions, success starts down low, which is exactly where Syracuse has struggled defensively so far this season. Syracuse needs a big day out of Bourama Sidibe in the middle of the 2-3 zone or perhaps a spot appearance from Jesse Edwards who flaunts a large wingspan and height advantage over Penn State’s forwards. Regardless, it’s going to be a struggle for Syracuse to limit the Nittany Lions offensively. In what will likely become the story of the year for SU, it just simply needs to shoot better than it did against Oklahoma State. Syracuse has defined itself as a 3-point shooting team. If those shots don’t fall, the Orange won’t win many games this year. Stat to know: 41.6%— Syracuse currently ranks 330th in the country in percentage of opponents’ scoring coming from 2-pointers. That might seem counterintuitive considering zone defenses typically yield 3-point shots, but SU has aggressively run shooters off the line instead of staying compact. This will come into play Friday as Penn State is mainly a two-point scoring team. Syracuse may be handing Penn State scoring opportunities in the exact spots the Nittany Lions want them. KenPom odds: Syracuse has a 45% chance to win the game Friday, with a final score prediction of the Nittany Lions winning 69-68 per KenPom.Player to watch: Stevens, Forward No. 11The image of Lamar Stevens rising to the hoop for an uncovered dunk could be replaying on SportsCenter all of Friday night. An All-Big Ten First Team selection last season, Stevens currently ranks fifth all-time in scoring at Penn State. In 2018-19, he scored in double digits in all but one game. Comments Published on November 29, 2019 at 2:35 pm Contact Josh: jlschafe@syr.edu | @Schafer_44 Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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‘Baseball is baseball’: An inside look at the Somerset Patriots and the challenges of independent ball

first_imgIn other words: It’s not spring weather. It’s not baseball weather. And it sucks.While the weather isn’t indicative of the season, on the diamond at TD Bank Ballpark, members of the Somerset Patriots won’t let you know it. Mother Nature is doing her best to keep the players’ spirits down, but there are wide smiles, hearty laughs and — most importantly for players — an abundance of hope.”I looked at independent ball and said, ‘Do you wanna keep on playing? Do you believe in yourself as a major-league caliber player?'” said Alfredo Rodriguez, an infielder for the Patriots. “I did. So I said, ‘This is your opportunity. Make the most of it.'”MORE: Watch ‘ChangeUp,’ a new MLB live whiparound show on DAZNThe Patriots are upfront with two organizational goals: win a championship and help their players move on and up in baseball. For some, that may mean getting back to affiliated baseball or the majors. For others, it’s their last chance at reaching that level for the first time. It’s not about the money for a lot of these guys right now — it’s about chasing the dream. It’s both an electrifying and sobering thought for many.The Patriots, the most decorated, successful team in the Atlantic League of Professional Baseball is rife with players from all backgrounds and levels of experience. They’re in their first week of spring training, with Opening Day for the Atlantic League just over a week away, even though the weather isn’t allowing for those thoughts to enter the mind. With just two weeks of prep time for the season, there’s lots of work to be done: The roster needs to be solidified. They need to replace players who they were expecting to have who moved onto other leagues. They need to get in game shape.It’s a welcome grind for players, whose opportunity with the Patriots is a second — or third, or fourth — chance at a shot to get back to affiliated or Major League Baseball. For indy ball veterans, the window for opportunity to get to that next level is tantalizing. It’s a high they continuously chase.But there’s a throwback attitude for indy ball players in the Atlantic League — not to say they are old-fashioned or behind the times, but there’s a clear focus on team, fun and family in baseball over the pageantry, pomp and circumstance. A lot of focus is set on making most of the opportunity in the ALPB with the Patriots.Part of that old-school nature is the 6,100-seat ballpark, which is nestled just a few miles away from downtown Somerset, N.J., a picturesque Pleasantville-like area of New Jersey. The ballpark and its surroundings are another fitting snapshot of that dose of Americana: Across the street from the park, there’s a strip mall — a New Jersey staple — with a Target, Bed Bath & Beyond and a Home Depot. It’s like a bad movie cliché.Nicknamed “The Jewel of the Atlantic League,” the stadium might be a far cry from baseball cathedrals like Fenway Park, Wrigley Field or Yankee Stadium, but it’s home for indy ballplayers trying to make or rediscover their names. Oftentimes, players’ first impression of indy ball is this stadium, which doesn’t always match their low expectations when they sign on. Director of baseball operations and pitching coach Jon Hunton and manager Brett Jodie say most newcomers take a look at the park and their minds are set at ease, knowing that they aren’t playing in a back alley in front of 10 people and a stray cat.If there’s anyone who exemplifies that gritty, nose-to-the-grindstone, old-school ballplayer attitude, it’s Craig Massey. He’s an indy ball lifer, whose sole goal is to win a championship with Somerset. Individual goals come secondary.After a day of fielding practice, batting practice and an intersquad game, the 2018 Atlantic League batting champ takes a seat in the dugout and stares out to the TD Bank Ballpark field, soaking it in wearing a shirt soaked in sweat.”It’s awesome,” Massey says with pride, dignity and a hint of humility. “It has that big-league feel for me.”The Somerset Patriots are in many ways a microcosm of independent baseball — the hope, the dreams, the fun, the frustration and the reality that baseball careers don’t last forever. These are some of their stories.The way backIt’s game time, and Brett Oberholtzer is locked in.He’s laser-focused on every pitch. He’s examining delivery. Release point. Pitch selection. Batter’s reactions. The only thing is, Oberholtzer’s not doing this from the mound — he’s doing this from the seats behind home plate. “Good pitch!” Oberholtzer yells, clapping his hands, supporting his teammate on the mound. Between every toss, he calculates every answer to my questions, with his focus 95 percent on the game and 5 percent on me — the 5 percent might be generous.Before ending up with the Somerset Patriots, the big lefty pitched in 82 games during his major league career, starting 44 of them, hurling to a 4.36 ERA. Not terrible by any stretch, but inconsistencies may have been his undoing at the major league level, where he spent time with the Astros, Angels and Phillies.Oberholtzer isn’t scheduled to pitch in today’s game, but needless to say he would rather be 60 feet, 6 inches from home plate, not 10 rows behind it.“Obviously, I’m not complacent and don’t want to pitch here,” Oberholtzer says. “Even though, if it ended up being that way, it’s the best option. That’s how I see it.”Oberholtzer’s words don’t knock the Atlantic League or his teammates, but rather illustrate the frustration of being stuck in something of a baseball rut. In fact, he repeats over and over again how he couldn’t be more appreciative of the opportunity and praises the family-like atmosphere and loose approach to the game in the Atlantic League. But to be here and not in a major league camp or stadium or affiliate? That stings, and it’s palpable. (Somerset Patriots) https://images.daznservices.com/di/library/sporting_news/a6/67/craig-massey-ftr-embed-somerset-042419_r8vzdotzachr1kyvw49l0mp9q.jpg?t=1336242130&w=500&quality=80 “It’s not difficult,” Oberholtzer says uncomfortably. “Baseball is something I’ve done, I’ve played. But it’s not who I am. Then again, once baseball does end, I might be singing a different tune. I hope not, I don’t think I will be.”He pauses.”It’s gonna end for everyone some day.” (Somerset Patriots) https://images.daznservices.com/di/library/sporting_news/78/4a/brett-oberholtzer-somerset-ftr-042419_xm2hu9de04li1b3261ry04kqd.jpg?t=1334990194&w=500&quality=80 (Getty Images) https://images.daznservices.com/di/library/sporting_news/97/54/tyler-cloyd-embed-ftr-042419_132qqnlkxx97l1gfm8g2tqqdtw.jpg?t=1334990194&w=500&quality=80 Cloyd’s time with the Patriots this year might have been short, but he’s always been grateful for what Somerset offered him in 2019 and in the past. The Patriots took a chance when no one else would, and with that platform he got back to affiliated ball. In the process, he also rediscovered something he may have lost sight of in the past.”Playing fields might not be as nice as the big leagues. Stadiums ain’t gonna be as nice. Travel ain’t gonna be as nice,” Cloyd said.”But I love baseball way too much to say, ‘I’m not in affiliated ball, I’m not gonna play anymore.’ This is fun, it brings back a little bit more of the fun-ness of baseball. In the end, you realize how much fun you should have no matter where you’re at.”The way up For Mike Fransoso and Alfredo Rodriguez, the scent of baseball is, presumably, intoxicating.If you’re a fan, the smell of a ballpark might tickle your nose, too: hot dogs, fresh-cut grass, bubblegum, pine tar, dirt, all coming together to give off that all-too-familiar baseball aroma. It’s euphoric. It’s tantalizing. And it’s something Fransoso and Rodriguez don’t want to give up yet.Fransoso and Rodriguez both have affiliated ball experience, with the Pirates and Brewers, respectively. While both have been away from affiliated ball for a few years, they understand the window to get through to the majors isn’t closed just yet, even if it may appear that way from those looking on from the outside.Fransoso has baseball in his DNA. He’s from Portsmouth, N.H., noted Red Sox country. He’s played ball his entire life. A 2013 27th-round draft pick of the Pirates, Fransoso is entering his second year with the Patriots and has spent three of the past four years playing with independent leagues. Things didn’t exactly work out as he’d hoped in the minors: at High-A ball, Fransoso hit .209 with a .539 OPS in 73 games; he played in 213 minor-league games total, hitting .238 in total. Independent baseball has turned Fransoso’s offensive struggles around, hitting .276 with a .772 OPS in 294 across three seasons in the Atlantic League, Australian Baseball League and the Canadian-American Association.”(Independent ball) is actually a lot of fun. It gives you a second chance once you’re out of affiliated or a first chance if you didn’t get an affiliated opportunity to come out and continue to play baseball, try to move up the ladder,” Fransoso says. “Maybe you were a backup, and now you get your shot. It’s a good opportunity for guys, and now you get a shot to play.”This is one of the biggest goals of the Patriots — they want to help players like Fransoso and Rodriguez get to the next level, back to affiliated ball, to see them succeed at the highest level. While Oberholtzer and Cloyd pitched in front of major league crowds, Fransoso and Rodriguez haven’t had that same opportunity. But Somerset continues to push them upward.Rodriguez, a 32nd-round pick of the Brewers in 2011, echos Fransoso’s sentiment.”This is my third year, so I’ve become familiar with Somerset,” Rodriguez says. “They’ve given me an opportunity to show my talents in this league, a very good independent league. They’ve just provided that kind of platform to get seen by major league teams, and hopefully get that next opportunity.”And for those who get signed whose names aren’t Alfredo Rodriguez?”You can’t really get caught up in who’s getting signed, who’s not getting signed,” Rodriguez says. “You just have to go play your game.”For Fransoso, Rodriguez and other members of the Patriots, the idea of returning or getting to affiliated ball is invigorating, but they understand that it’s something out of their hands, a lesson they learned along the way in independent ball. Fransoso, now 28, reached high A-ball with the Pirates before venturing out onto the independent circuit, trying to carve out a path to the majors.While it’s a daunting task, both stress the importance of doing your job every day, playing hard and earning your spot. The rest will take care of itself.”It was nice for me because I got an opportunity to play every day,” Rodriguez says. “With the Brewers, I was not playing every day and I wasn’t playing my natural position at shortstop.”Independent ball has allowed me to get back to what I was in college and my first year in pro ball, and I did that in the Frontier League and here,” Rodriguez continues. “It’s really given me the opportunity to play my natural position and give me my confidence to show my skill set.”Rodriguez is coming off his best offensive season as a professional ballplayer, hoping to make his name known among tough competition. “I think every guy in affiliated ball, they think it’s a different quality of baseball. But you’re playing with all the guys that have played in the major leagues, in Triple-A and higher levels. Essentially, it’s a Double-A, Triple-A level, sprinkle in some major league guys and younger guys.””Even here, there’s that second level of mental toughness, where you can’t really worry about what’s happening around you, what’s happening above you in different leagues,” Rodriguez says.Craig Massey, resident “sponge,” has spent his life in indy ball learning just that.Massey has the energy of a Labrador, demonstrably thrilled to be back on a baseball field. The 29-year-old Alabamian has traveled across the United States, overseas and back playing independent baseball. He’s taken grounders down under in Australia. He briefly shagged flies under the Northern Lights in Canada. Along the way, he’s tried to soak up as much information from other players as possible — from major leaguers, other indy guys, coaches and more.That information has come to good use: Massey is ready for another season, one in which he’s going to defend his 2018 Atlantic League batting title. His Patriots’ shirt is drenched in sweat after a day of workouts and a short intersquad game. But instead of fatigue, his eyes are filled with energy and excitement when talking about another season. The pressure of performing isn’t getting to him. (Somerset Patriots) https://images.daznservices.com/di/library/sporting_news/7d/7b/mike-fransoso-somerset-ftr-42419_6wyppjsm3haizs78k7gpg7bp.jpg?t=1334990194&w=500&quality=80 (Somerset Patriots) https://images.daznservices.com/di/library/sporting_news/e3/8a/brett-jodie-embed-042419_6iese6kw43m31wyisgd4r4bcu.jpg?t=1334990194&w=500&quality=80 A 1998 sixth-round selection of the Yankees, Jodie pitched just a season in at the major league level — eight games, to be exact — before finding himself pitching for the Patriots in 2003, so he’s familiar with the way things operate in the Atlantic League. He’s been manager of Somerset since 2013, taking over for another former Yankee, Sparky Lyle. Lyle was the first employee hired by the organization in 1998.Jodie led the Patriots to a league championship in 2015, the sixth in Somerset’s history. But his odyssey with the team started well before, while rehabbing a shoulder injury; Jodie’s agent said the best spot for him to pitch would be with the Patriots as he was looking for places to play. He knew nothing — literally nothing — about Somerset or independent ball, but Jodie says he fell in love with the Atlantic League, and the rest is history.”We work very hard to keep a certain reputation here,” Jodie says. “We’re very honest up front. If you start telling one person one thing, and another person another, it’s gonna get out. We try to be very consistent with how we handle our business, what we do, trying to get guys outta here, get ’em signed, no matter what it does to our club. “If it hurts us, that’s fine. That’s part of the game. We want to help these guys out and move ’em on.”Somerset doesn’t shy away from its reputation of being something of a stopover for players of all calibers. Jodie and Jon Hunton, the team’s pitching coach and director of baseball operations, stay in contact with affiliates, overseas leagues and even MLB teams to try to bolster some players’ reputations and work endlessly to find them new organizations.”I’ll reach out to teams on my own if I feel the need,” Hunton says. “I’ll say, ‘Hey, I don’t know what you guys need, but consider this guy or that guy.’ We have scouts that reach out to us, and say, ‘Hey, give me the top five starters in your league.’ They respect our opinions, and we prove ourselves. Which is great, that’s what we want.”As players are signed and move on, the organization has to be ready to fill the gaps. It was but two seasons ago when the Patriots had 18 players signed from its roster during the season, and the team had to rebuild almost constantly and fill holes on the fly.”It’s very unique and it’s very tough, and that’s what makes this league fun, but frustrating,” Jodie says. ” … It’s very tough to keep a complete team that you know is exactly how you want it, because it gets picked apart.”Hunton stressed the difficulty of keeping a team together.”We lost two guys to go to Mexico within the last two weeks,” he said. “Guys that we were expecting that were gonna be here if they didn’t get picked up.”Hunton affirms much of what Jodie says. The Patriots want players who come in hungry, ready to compete and want to be a part of the team. Hunton says he spends little time chasing players down — if a player wants to be a part of the Patriots, they’ll come to him.As someone who played indy ball, Hunton understands that it takes a special kind of player to tough out an indy season.”I tell them this: You gotta come in and have drive,” Hunton says. “…You gotta compete. You’re not gonna be handed anything. Whether it’s a role or a roster spot. You gotta compete and show your worth. I tell that to returners or new guys.”I’m gonna give you the exact information what it is, not what I think you want to hear. I’ll give you the information, if you’re interested, (but) I want you to come to me, because that shows me you really want to be here. Don’t expect me to call you tomorrow or the next day, because I’m leaving this in your corner now. They get it. I don’t want a guy coming here because I swayed them to come here, because they may not be bought in to indy ball.” (Somerset Patriots) https://images.daznservices.com/di/library/sporting_news/a0/eb/jon-hunton-somerset-patriots-ftr-042419_1w76rqxvdph3e1s24tnn5skju0.jpg?t=1334990194&w=500&quality=80 An indy-ball lifer, Massey has seen offensive success throughout his indy career. As such, he’s learned a lot from major leaguers he’s come across: how they approach the game, their routines, their pace during the day-to-day grind. Massey has learned a lot, but the one thing he’s focused on more than anything else is winning a ring. “A big, fat ring,” he says.But playing indy ball isn’t for the faint of heart, either. For most players — like Oberholtzer — playing in indy ball is an uncomfortable realization of the closing window on their baseball lives. How do players handle that unease?”You just gotta embrace it,” Massey told SN. “You just gotta appreciate it, realize pressure is a privilege. Indy ball is like playing on a one-day contract, every day. You can either embrace it, or let it get to you — eat you alive.”Or you can do what you gotta do, work hard and see what happens.”The way inBrett Jodie has a very difficult job.A full spring training compacted into a two-week period isn’t easy. In such a short time, Jodie and the rest of the staff has to figure out the key pieces to the 2019 Patriots season. Just before spring training started, the Patriots lost two players who joined a Mexican league. That’s just the start of what they can expect from the continuously shifting roster throughout 2019.Building out a roster isn’t easy. Jodie and other Somerset personnel put out calls to agents and ballplayers looking for a home. They don’t waste time trying to sell indy ball to anyone — with an honest approach, they give pros and cons of playing with Somerset. They want guys who want to be there, Jodie says, not guys who are just looking for a check.When a roster’s in place, trying to decide who stays, who goes and who fits in such a short window seems a bit unfair during spring training, even though Jodie won’t say so. “You’re not at liberty to bring in a great amount of guys; you kind of have to go on past history and numbers,” Jodie says. “Are you going to bring in three big league guys, and maybe they don’t have the best camp — are you going to release them? And they’ve been great their whole career. Then you have some younger guys who have to have a good camp, they’re not at liberty to go in there and struggle.”I don’t want to say it’s unfair, because you’re grading them on their past history and the numbers they put up. You have a track record with that, but it’s such a small sample size in a short timeframe, it’s kind of difficult.” BRIDGEWATER, N.J. — It’s a crappy day in Bridgewater.The weather is miserable for a mid-April day. It’s cold and windy. The sun is hidden under a sheet of gray. There’s occasional drizzle, piercing the skin like frozen needles. The sound of birds chirping is nonexistent, replaced by honking horns and cars whizzing by on busy Route 287, just a few hundred yards from the ad-plastered left-field wall. (Somerset Patriots) https://images.daznservices.com/di/library/sporting_news/f0/d3/alfredo-rodriguez-embed-ftr-042419_65k3x5y392qy16iie78jh5wmf.jpg?t=1336295618&w=500&quality=80 Jodie and Hunton say one of the biggest struggles for all players — those with MLB experience and those trying to make The Show — is learning to control what you can control. According to Jodie, if a player is performing well in independent ball, his “internal clock” could start to mess with him.”The biggest thing with players is that they have a timetable in their head,” Jodie says. “‘Man, I had three good starts,’ or ‘I’m hitting .350’ or something, but the phone’s not ringing yet. You gotta control what you can control, and let the other stuff take care of itself. You can’t worry about getting signed. Maybe they want to get off to a really hot start and maybe their first two starts aren’t great, or maybe they’re 0-for-14 or something like that. You can’t let it snowball.”Jodie understands that sometimes seasons are more about “survival” than they are about putting together a perfect roster. Just as an indy ball team is one puzzle piece away from competing, another could get signed away. “I don’t care if a guy gets picked up, that’s what it’s about,” Hunton says. “There is no independent baseball if guys don’t get an opportunity to move on or to get to bigger and better. We strive on wanting to win and have success, but at the end of the day, we want all of our guys to get picked up.”Unfortunately, that’s not the case 100 percent of the time.The way outThere is life after baseball, and Alfredo Rodriguez knows it. He feels it creeping closer every offseason.The harrowing reality of independent ball is just that: It’s independent ball. Players are staring down their baseball mortality, wrestling with the idea that they’ll never get back to the majors or sniff a major-league clubhouse. There are 750 active players on major league rosters. There just isn’t enough room for everybody. For some, dealing with the idea that this is my last game, my last at-bat, my last mad dash to home plate isn’t easy.For others, it’s just the way of life. Rodriguez, the soon-to-be 29-year-old infielder, is entering his third year with Somerset and admits to taking his baseball future season by season. He has a degree from the University of Maryland, and is readying for a life after the game.He’s grateful for the opportunity to play baseball every day, but knows that at some point, with every player, life after baseball begins. How often does he think about his next life? “Every offseason,” Rodriguez says, resigned. “Every offseason, I go, ‘I’m gonna go one more year, I’m gonna go one more year.’ You want to pursue the dream to the fullest, but at the same time, I’m realistic.”You have to be a little unrealistic to play independent baseball, but I understand that it’s not the end of the world. People are going to be doing something other than baseball for the rest of their life.” Fransoso added: “For a lot of guys, it’s tough. I know I’ve thought about it before. Baseball’s what we’ve been doing for so long, and a lot of us don’t know anything else besides getting ready for a season, playing the season and repeating. It’s a big part of your life, and that afterthought can put a little damper on things sometimes.” Hunton knows — as do players — that playing independent ball is still a very viable option to getting back to wherever they want to be. They know the stadium is gorgeous. They know the facilities are superb. Players see the stadium, a small neighborhood of baseball heaven, and understand that playing some ball is better than playing none at all. That all said, Hunton addresses the elephant in the dugout.”This is not ideal,” he says. “It’s not ideal to come here, it’s not ideal to play indy ball.”Oberholtzer, itching to get back to a major league squad, doesn’t want to talk about life after baseball. His confidence and mind tell him he can make it back. He knows he’s still got the pathway to the majors, given his pedigree. But the thought of living without baseball has crossed his mind. But through it all, Oberholtzer is having fun. He relishes the opportunity to reinvent himself and make his way back to the majors, with indy ball being just a stepping stone to getting back to The Show. But there’s a certain tinge of impatience and frustration in his voice.”I try to put my ego aside and forget (pitching in the majors),” Oberholtzer says. “I’ve gotten an opportunity. I know there’s some guys who’s had just as equal an opportunity to pitch in the big leagues and didn’t. I’m grateful for the opportunity to do what I did.”It’s a struggle (to think about pitching with Somerset), but I try the most out of it, make every negative a positive.”He thinks he can still pitch at the major-league level. He has his health and he feels he belongs in the majors. He says that the business side of things got in the way of his affiliated ball career, not being in the right place and time, with the shifting landscape of prospects and younger players coming up, interfering with the way of his progression as a major leaguer.This is Oberholtzer’s second stint with Somerset. In 2018, his first short stint resulted in his contract being purchased by the Rockies before he threw a pitch for the squad. He elected free agency at the end of 2018, played winter ball and found himself back with Somerset a year later, knowing that this was a viable path back to affiliated baseball. Back with the Patriots, Oberholtzer hopes he gets to move onto the majors once again. He has the support of his teammates and staff, but the path is difficult to walk for a guy with that much big league experience.”Hopefully, this ain’t it,” Oberholtzer said about pitching for Somerset. “Brett (Jodie) and Jon (Hunton) and the Kalafer family make it fun and easy to play for the team. But it’s never easy.”I’m here now, that’s how I look at it,” he continued. “There’s nothing I can do now. I’m here now. I’ve gotta make the most of it. You learn a lot about yourself when nobody’s really watching.”With independent ball, though, sometimes teams are watching and paying attention — such was the case with Tyler Cloyd.Much like his teammate Oberholtzer, Cloyd is a well-traveled baseball man: he spent time with the Phillies, Mariners, Marlins and Samsung Lions of the KBO league in South Korea. In 2019, less than a week into the Patriots’ spring training workouts, Cloyd got the call to return to the Mariners organization, signing a minor league deal with Seattle.But long before Cloyd’s second stint with the Ms, he made the most of his 2017 opportunity with the Patriots. Following his recovery from Tommy John surgery, in three starts Cloyd pitched to a 1.50 ERA, retiring 16 batters by way of strikeout in just 12 innings. Shortly thereafter, the Mariners signed him to a minor league deal, assigning him to Triple-A Tacoma. Cloyd credits the competition level in the Atlantic League as part of his progress and road back to the majors.”It’s not different at all. Baseball is baseball; there’s good players in every league,” Cloyd says. “You take stuff for granted, you take things lightly and all of a sudden, things can be going haywire.”Cloyd, whose wife and three children live in Nebraska while he embarks on another baseball season, admits that it’s grown increasingly difficult to leave them behind each year while chasing another big league opportunity. While Cloyd’s family visits, FaceTimes and speaks with him as often as possible, he acknowledges that being away from the rest of the Cloyd clan has been a hard sacrifice.”It’s tough being gone for so long,” Cloyd said. “You miss things that you don’t want to miss. But it’s a sacrifice. God willing, they’ll be out here as soon as they can, experiencing this with me.”Cloyd says that his rapid return from Tommy John surgery (10 1/2 months) scared away affiliated teams in 2017, which is how he ended up in Somerset for his first stint as a Patriot. Along with the Patriots’ staff, Cloyd worked out a pitching schedule that showed teams he was healthy and able to pitch, eventually ending up with the Mariners.”The game plays probably about the same, but the atmosphere is a little bit different,” Cloyd says. “It’s more relaxed here. You’re not looking over your shoulder like in affiliated ball after every single game, wondering if you’re getting sent down or getting released.”But you’re still expected to go out there every five days as a pitcher, sometimes every day as bullpen guy or every day as a position player. We’re not just out here messing around. … We’re not lackadaisical. We still get our job done. It’s still a job to do.”last_img read more

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Updated: July 16: Chamber director talks about the 2014 Kansas Wheat Festival and horse ban in Monday’s interview

first_imgEditor’s clarification: July 16, 2014: Since this story was written and published on July 14, there has been dispute whether the Chamber Executive Director Shelley Hansel had said she was going to ban horses in the parade during an interview at the chamber office on Monday. Since this story has been written, the chamber board presented a letter to the public that no decision on the matter of the horses in the parade has been issued. It has been requested that we take this story down. Sumner Newscow refuses to do so because we stand by the contents of this story as it was presented at the time. by Tracy McCue, Sumner Newscow — The crowds were bigger, the participants in contests were smaller and the term “remember when they used to have horses in the Kansas Wheat Festival parade?” is now a reality.For everything that happened during the five-day 2014 Kansas Wheat Festival – it’s always the bad unexpected things that people will most remember. The 2014 event will be marked by a parade participant Chelsea Easterly, who was bucked off her horse during Friday night’s parade.As a result, come next summer when the 115th Kansas Wheat Festival rolls around, horses will be prohibited from participating in the parade.“If you think about it now, it seems like a disaster ready to happen,” said Wellington Area Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Shelley Hansel. “You have all these people compacted in one area a horse somewhere is bound to get spooked.“So I think for safety purposes, it’s best not to have them in the parade. I just thank God Chelsea wasn’t hurt severely in the accident. I truly believe there was a higher being looking down from above that helped cushion her fall.”Easterly did not sustain serious injury, other than bumps and bruises and a big goose egg on the back of her head after being taken to SRMC for observation.Easterly was part of a group of horseback riders and was riding along with a 4-year-old boy named “Aiden” in front of her when the horse for some unknown reason got spooked and bucked her off just south of the turn on Washington Ave. and Harvey.There were actually four groups in attendance who were riding horses and she was near the tail end. As a result the parade was cut short. There were three parade entries behind them, including the Kansas Shriners, who were unable to participate. Then there were those who were wanting to be in the parade but did not register. Thus they were placed at the end of the parade – which fate would prove they didn’t participate anyway.“It really could have lasted an hour long,” Hansel said of the parade.While the horse incident overshadowed the second big controversy of the parade and that was the new route. It changed due to the Kansas Ag Day Expo being in town that had many large farm implements parked on Washington from Harvey to Eighth Street. The parade usually goes straight through, but because of the expo it turned at Harvey and ended at Jefferson.“I don’t know if we’ll do it again next year or not,” Hansel said. “We just have to wait and see what the Expo people do. I had a few people complain about it while others liked it.”Overall, Hansel said the participation was up. The street dance and chamber beer garden saw significantly more customers. The carnival was again heavily attended.The big negative was the participation in contested events.“We were begging for people to participate in certain events just so we would have enough to hold them,” Hansel said. “Sometimes we would get a bunch of people coming in and participating at the last moment.”Hansel said the Festival also brought in a significant number of outsiders.“I was speaking to Kasha Kelly, the state representative over in Arkansas City,” Hansel said. “And she told me that she wished Ark City had a five-day event like this one. They have Arkalalah but that is a huge one day festival. She was impressed just how Wellington was able to pull it off.”Follow us on Twitter. Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comments (76) Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings Sort by: Date Rating Last Activity Loading comments… Commenting Disabled Further commenting on this page has been disabled by the blog admin. You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. +9 Vote up Vote down momma of Aiden · 317 weeks ago i would love for everyone to get there facts straight. Report Reply 1 reply · active 317 weeks ago +21 Vote up Vote down guest · 317 weeks ago Perhaps portipottys should also be banned since a person had a seizure after getting too hot in one during the Wheat Festival. Report Reply 2 replies · active 317 weeks ago +2 Vote up Vote down lovewheatfest · 317 weeks ago I get it, but hate it!! Report Reply 0 replies · active 317 weeks ago +17 Vote up Vote down Becky · 317 weeks ago Maybe the beer garden should be banned, since it might result in someone driving drunk and killing someone else or themselves. Maybe the carnival should be banned in case someone would happen to fall off a ride and get hurt. Maybe the Wheat Run should be banned in case someone might fall or get too hot. Come on. …. change some things about where the horses are placed, if a horse is causing problems, the rider needs to take them out of the parade, but don’t ban them completely. Report Reply 2 replies · active 317 weeks ago +16 Vote up Vote down Guest 2 · 317 weeks ago Way to go Shelly. That was stupid to ban horses over one accident in how many years! Its not a wonder how many people feel about the chamber and the way they run things. Thats just stupid. Another reason to avoid the parade now. Report Reply 0 replies · active 317 weeks ago +20 Vote up Vote down Guest · 317 weeks ago The Wheat Festival this year seemed to be very unorginized especially the parade. Yes there was a lot more people attending but what a mess the parade was. Turning the corner was a big mistake. Maybe Ag Day and the parade should be on different days? Everyone was so bunched up and HORSES SHOULD be last. The parade itself was good but with it being a shorter distance caused people standing three and four deep not letting everyone see and with the throwing out of candy there was children running out to get it. Maybe that practice should be stopped. My hat is off to the Aviator Church for all their help. Report Reply 0 replies · active 317 weeks ago +6 Vote up Vote down Boo-hoo! · 317 weeks ago Boo hoo! Get over it!! The majority of the parade has been taken over by politicians. Report Reply 1 reply · active 317 weeks ago +19 Vote up Vote down NO DOGS allowed · 317 weeks ago also i am tired of peoples dogs walking up to me, licking me, sniffing me and others, ppl this is not a place to bring dogs, keep them at home where they are cool and not out in large groups such as arts and crafts time, carnival and street dance, keep dogs at home, also with all the kids running around at the street dance, i am done i have one more thing but i will stop now. thanks Report Reply 0 replies · active 317 weeks ago +18 Vote up Vote down cheers · 317 weeks ago Well nice to know the attendance at the beer garden was up..maybe change the name to the Kansas Beer fest…i know that the chamber makes money on that event and sadly about the only one but it is placed between two business that serve Wellington. MAYBE put the stage back on main and let these folks make a living…NOW onto Horses..the rider in this case has been around horses her whole life and has alot of experience. Sometimes things happen. The sad thing is the knee jerk reaction by the chamber. Poorly timed and not well thought out. Take the horses out and the people running for office and well there is no parade. Report Reply 1 reply · active 317 weeks ago +7 Vote up Vote down no candy · 317 weeks ago I think the candy tossing should stop. Kids and adults were going to the middle of the street just to get a mini tootsie roll. They were standing in front of us who were sitting and were really rude. And it is dangerous for the kids who could get hit or run over. I may just avoid the parade next year. Report Reply 0 replies · active 317 weeks ago 12345Next » Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new commentslast_img read more

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Doris Horning, 65, Belle Plaine: Jan. 13, 1950 – Oct. 2, 2015

first_imgDoris HorningDoris Horning, 65, of Belle Plaine, died Friday, October 2, 2015 at her home with her loving family.Funeral services will be held at 2 p.m., Tuesday, October 6, 2015 at the United Methodist Church in Belle Plaine, KS. Burial will be at the Belle Plaine Cemetery. Visitation will be Monday, October 5th from noon until 8:00 P.M. at the Shelley Family Funeral Home in Wellington. No family night is scheduled. A memorial has been established with the United Methodist Church in Belle Plaine in her name. For further information please visit www.shelleyfamilyfh.com.Doris Carole Horning was born on January 13, 1950 the daughter of Opal W. and Mildred (Parker) Webb in Lindsay, Oklahoma. She was united in marriage with Mark Horning in 1972 in Oklahoma City. Doris enjoyed life immensely, she loved pets, decorating, traveling and reading. She especially treasured her daughter, Emily and son-in-law David, and grandchildren; Anthony, Jerushka and Nicholas. She was a remarkable prayer warrior and loved the Lord her whole life. Doris enjoyed many wonderful friendships and was especially grateful to her church family at Belle Plaine United Methodist Church.Surviving to honor her memory is her husband Mark of the home, daughter, Emily Anne Craddock and husband David of Belle Plaine, three grandchildren Anthony Fergola, Nicholas Wells and Jerushka Craddock, sister, Lois Morris of Lindsay, OK, mother-in-law Monta Horning of Belle Plaine, and brother-in-law Rex Horning of Stillwater, OK.Preceding her in death are her parents and five siblings.last_img read more

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