Netflix says LacMegantic footage will be removed from Bird Box movie

first_imgOTTAWA — After initially refusing, Netflix has agreed to remove images of the 2013 Lac-Megantic disaster from its blockbuster film, “Bird Box.”WATCH: Netflix apologizes after using Lac-Megantic footage A spokesman says in an email to The Canadian Press that the streaming company is sorry for any pain it caused to the residents of Lac-Megantic, Que.READ MORE:Canadian MPs condemn Netflix for using Lac-Megantic images in Bird BoxQuebec culture minister scolds Netflix over Lac-Megantic footage in ‘Bird Box’Netflix apologizes to Lac-Megantic for using rail disaster footage in ‘Bird Box’ People in the town and across the province were shocked after learning in January that footage from the derailment and explosion that killed 47 people was used in the drama starring Sandra Bullock.Demands that the brief scene be removed came from politicians at all levels, including Lac-Megantic Mayor Julie Morin.WATCH: Outrage over use of Lac-Megantic footagecenter_img Quebec Culture Minister Nathalie Roy wrote to the company in January calling for it to remove the footage of the burning town.The company apologized and promised to do better, but until now it had refused to edit the film to remove the images.last_img read more

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Sugar Ray Leonard Foundation Presents Big Fighters Big Cause

first_imgB. Riley & Co. and The Sugar Ray Leonard Foundation present The 4th Annual “Big Fighters, Big Cause” Charity Fight Night to benefit The Sugar Ray Leonard Foundation in its support for Juvenile Diabetes Research and The Wounded Warrior Project.This prestigious invitation-only Red Carpet event will take place at The Santa Monica Pier on May 21, 2013.Anthony Anderson will be the Master of Ceremony for the evening, which will feature a PROAM fight card commissioned by the California State Athletic Commission and USA Boxing. Songstress Franchesca Robi (daughter of The Platters’ Paul Robi) will sing the National Anthem to ring in the fights. The fight card will consist of amateur and professional heavyweight bouts.The event anticipates a targeted audience of over 1000 guests, comprised of C-suite executives from nearly 200 public companies across a range of sectors, leading institutional investors, high net worth individuals, financial services professionals, celebrities, sports legends, and other high-profile individuals.Zota Pop, a Top 40s band comprised of world-class musicians, will provide musical entertainment along with DJ BABY CHINO, the 10-year-old DJ phenomenon who has been seen on Nickelodeon’s hit show “Figure It Out”.Rusnak, Maserati, BMW and Porsche, part of the Rusnak Auto Group is proud to support the Sugar Ray Leonard Foundation. Sugar Ray Leonard will honor Medtronic, Inc. by presenting an Award in the ring for its work in Juvenile Diabetes with the Insulin Pump. The Hauser Insurance Group is also a proud supporter of the cause. The evening will be set against a rich environment for both charitable and business development opportunities.A true highlight of the evening will be the Live Auction to raise funds for the cause. Sparkling Hill Resort, a European-inspired wellness resort known as the first resort in the world to incorporate Swarovski crystal elements into every aspect of its design, stands out. The winner of this Live Auction Item will receive a gift certificate for a 5 night Couples Escape in a stunning penthouse suite, with access to a wide range of wellness treatments featured at the resort’s world-renowned Kurspa – a 40,000 square foot spa providing over 100 treatments and therapies.Guests will enjoy an abundance of delicious food and beverages offered to guests to relish. Legends Beer will offer its premium craft beer in the Legends 100% recyclable aluminum bottle. Legends believes that consumers can have both great beer, and interesting content with the same package.Other fantastic beverages available to guests are Asombroso Tequila, Monster Energy Drink, Hansen, Sneaky Pete’s Beverage, Tito’s Handmade Vodka, and Weaver’s Coffee & Tea. More delectable food sponsors include: Beachy Cream, Sheila G’s The Original Brownie Brittle Company, Deano’s Deli, Good Greek Grub, Jalisco’s Mobile Taco Grill, Monsoon Café, Rollin’ Rib BBQ, Sabra Dipping Co., SUSHI POPPER, and Sweet Insanity Bake Shop.The Sugar Ray Leonard Foundation was launched by boxing legend and six-time world champion Sugar Ray Leonard to benefit the Juvenile Diabetes Research. The mission of The Sugar Ray Leonard Foundation (SRLF) is to find a cure for diabetes and its complications through the support of research. After watching his father struggle with Diabetes and its complications for years, Ray is very passionate about finding a cure for Juvenile Diabetes. Ray is also very passionate about empowering wounded warriors dealing with post-traumatic stress disorder and other lasting effects of combat. Part of the proceeds from this event will be going to the Wounded Warrior Project (WWP). For more information about the Foundation and their cause, click here.Source:PRWeb.comlast_img read more

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Eddie Izzard Begins Marathon Challenge For Sport Relief

first_imgEddie Izzard has completed the first of his 27 marathons for Sport Relief.Eddie Izzard Starts Marathon ChallengeThe actor and comedian began his challenge to compete 27 marathons in 27 days from Mbashe Bridge, near the town of Mvezo in the Eastern Cape of South Africa. The spot is the birthplace of Nelson Mandela, who inspired Eddie to take on this epic challenge, which will see him run over 700 miles in temperatures of up to 30°C.The new BBC Three will cover Eddie’s journey from his first marathon on 23rd February to his last marathon on 20th March.Eddie has chosen to run 27 marathons to reflect the 27 years that Nelson Mandela spent in prison. Throughout his journey he will explore the history of South Africa and Nelson Mandela as well as visiting organisations and families that have been helped by the work of Comic Relief.Eddie’s mammoth undertaking will culminate in Pretoria on Sunday 20th March, at the same time as the Sport Relief Games will be taking place across the UK.The challenge will be an important one for Eddie as he had to pull out of a similar feat in South Africa in 2012 for health reasons. That attempt followed his fantastic effort for Sport Relief in 2009, when he completed 43 marathons in 51 days across the UK, raising over £1.8m.Speaking about his training regime, Eddie said: “I have been prepared since the day that I stopped back in 2012. Since 2012, I have been prepared to go back. I stay match fit the whole time but I don’t have a complete regime – I am holistic in my approach to things.”The money raised from the Eddie Izzard: Marathon Man challenge will be used to help transform the lives of some of the most disadvantaged people both at home in the UK and across the world’s poorest communities.BBC Three, which launches on Tuesday 16th February, will document Eddie’s progress every step of the way via its new digital and social channels.last_img read more

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William F White Intl Announces Inaugural Winner of the William F WhiteVilmos

first_imgAdvertisement Login/Register With: Advertisement Paul Bronfman, Chairman/CEO of Comweb Corp. and leading equipment provider, William F. White International Inc. (Whites) announced the winner of the inaugural William F. White/Vilmos Zsigmond Cinematography Scholarship at the annual Whites VIP TIFF Reception at the TIFF Bell Lightbox. Congratulations to Adam Madrzyk on winning $3,000.00 towards completing his 3rd year of Film Studies at Ryerson University. Adam, who is already an accomplished independent filmmaker with several feature films, short films and music videos to his name, also submitted a compelling essay highlighting the cinematographic and technical achievements of Zsigmond’s Oscar-winning film, “Close Encounters of the Third Kind.”The William F. White/Vilmos Zsigmond Cinematography Scholarship was created to provide a new generation of Canadian cinematographers with access to post-secondary hard skills training and development. Applicants were adjudicated by a scholarship committee which chose the successful candidate by taking into account academic achievement, extra-curricular activities and interests, community involvement and awards.“We wanted to honour Vilmos’ recent passing, along with our longstanding friendship and business partnership with a lasting tribute, something which we could do in perpetuity,” states Bronfman. “After all, Vilmos was a terrific gentleman and world-renowned cinematographer who helped Whites gain respect throughout Europe and beyond. We feel honoured and privileged to have been his partners at Sparks Camera & Lighting in Budapest for over 25 years and this scholarship is the perfect vehicle by which to pay homage to his legacy and contributions to the art of cinema.” “We’re really excited that Adam has won the first ever William F. White/Vilmos Zsigmond Cinematography Scholarship,” said Whites VP, Business Development, Rick Perotto. “Adam’s demo reel is outstanding and we’re very proud to support his education and future career endeavors.”Famed cinematographer and Oscar-winner, Vilmos Zsigmond passed away on January 1st of this year at the age of 85. A long-time business partner of Whites since 1991, Zsigmond was one of the founders and owners of Whites’ affiliate, Sparks Camera and Lighting Ltd., a leading Budapest, Hungary-based provider of top-notch professional production equipment servicing western and eastern European content creators. Sparks was originally co-founded through Whites as a joint business venture with Zsigmond.Zsigmond was not only well-known for his artistic merit, but also for his numerous industry achievements, including his co-founding of the Global Cinematography Institute in Los Angeles and membership on the Board of Governors at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences, among many others. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Facebook Advertisement Twitterlast_img read more

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Jennifer Holness and Sudz Sutherland win The Jackie Robinson Fortitude Award

first_imgAdvertisement Facebook LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Login/Register With: Advertisementcenter_img Advertisement Congratulations to Jennifer Holness and Sudz Sutherland, winners of The Jackie Robinson Fortitude Award! Presented by the Toronto Community Advisory Board, it recognizing their achievements in film and television, and their exemplary example of partnership and relationship. They founded their TIFF, Gemini and Canadian Screen award winning production company Hungry Eyes Film & Television. They have 3 beautiful daughters and are active in their community, mentoring young filmmakers.Jen and Sudz’s newest project is CBC’s Shoot The Messenger TV Series , a gripping 8-part drama series that follows a rookie reporter who witnesses a murder, and while investigating becomes enmeshed in a sticky web of drugs, guns, gang and too big to fail plot of political and corporate corruption. You can watch all four episodes online at bit.ly/SHTMEp1 and new episodes Mondays at 9pm on CBC!Award presented at 1st Fridays Women & Men Edition : This Friday November 11th, 2016 @ FUSE Restaurant2nd Floor – 366 Queen St. E., Toronto ON Twitterlast_img read more

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A year after Ghomeshi verdict sexual violence experts see significant advances

first_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment There is no doubt public awareness of sexual violence has increased, and that politicians are paying attention, but the same problems still exist, says Isabel Grant, a law professor at the University of British Columbia.She points to the recent decision (now under appeal) by a Halifax judge to acquit a taxi driver of sexual assault despite the extreme intoxication of the complainant as just one example of how the criminal justice system is still failing.“There is so much work to be done,” says Grant. “I think we are at the beginning of it now . . . I don’t think we should feel smug.”Outside the courtroom, crucial supports for women through rape crisis organizations and shelters remain underfunded, and many women, especially from marginalized communities, still face overwhelming barriers to services and protection.“What are we doing for the most vulnerable women?” she says.Educator and activist Julie Lalonde says there is growing recognition from the public and politicians that sexual violence is a widespread and complicated issue — but she says it remains frustrating that it has taken so long to get to this point.“How many high-profile trials (or investigations) will it take for you not to be shocked all the time?” she says of politicians. “Front-line advocates have been talking about this for years . . . You are not listening.”Much of the focus over the past year has been on the criminal justice system, and judges in particular. A pilot program was introduced to provide four free hours of legal advice to sexual assault survivors. The Canadian Judicial Council recommended Camp be removed as a judge after a rare public inquiry. And judicial education is the focus of a fast-tracked federal bill proposing would-be judges undergo mandatory comprehensive training in sexual assault law. The bill also calls for reports on how many current judges participate in continuing education seminars on sexual assault law.There have been “halting but significant advances,” says Amanda Dale, the executive director of the Barbra Schlifer clinic for women experiencing violence, pointing to Camp’s resignation and public debate about ethically-questionable defence lawyer tactics.However, she says, there is a long way to go in removing the reliance on rape myths from investigations and cross-examinations.“Innocent until proven guilty and rigorous cross examination may never be a healing activity for survivors, but they should at least not be principles that justify discrimination and abuse,” she says.The federal government allocating funding to diversity training for judges is a positive step but the government also needs to do a better job of appointing diverse, well-qualified judges, says Gillian Hnatiw, a lawyer who specializes in sexual assault and harassment cases.But faith in the criminal justice system’s ability to properly handle sexual assault cases remains shaken.Hnatiw says she has seen an increase over the past year in the number of women coming forward to talk about their options beyond reporting their sexual assault to the police — whether it is pursuing a claim at the Criminal Injuries Compensation Board, going to the human rights tribunal, going to a regulatory body like the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario, or suing their abuser in civil court.“I think women have become bolder about calling for change and calling out injustice when they see it,” she adds. “I think the Halifax decision is an example of how women are empowered to not just gnash their teeth anymore, but pick up the phone and complain. The Ghomeshi case didn’t make women angry, I think a lot of women were already angry and it was the spark that compelled them to start (speaking out).”In the year since the Ghomeshi verdict, the case’s most high-profile complainant Lucy DeCoutere has spent a lot of time thinking about alternative ways for sexual assault survivors to seek justice outside the criminal court system, like restorative justice programs.“It should be the safest thing,” she says of reporting a sexual assault to the police. “But the legal system is not a friend to you . . . The system is not there to help you. The system is there to go through motions that work as they have for hundreds of years and it takes a long time to turn that ship around.”Though she applauds women who do testify in court, she says the cost to her has been “too expensive for no payback.”By expensive she means not just the financial cost of therapy, but the cost to her health and her professional and social life.The toll of the case, the publicity, the online harassment and the emotionally exhausting conversations with well-meaning strangers left her seriously ill for eight months, she says, and she is only now improving.She is moving forward by educating the young people around her about consent and intimate-partner violence, so that they understand things she did not.“Kids are still being taught the bad guys are in the bushes.”By: Torstar News Service – Originally Published on Sun Mar 26 2017 The resignation of Robin Camp, the judge who asked a sexual assault complainant why she didn’t just keep her “knees together.”A judge who broke new ground by ordering a convicted rapist to pay his victim’s legal bill.The federal government putting $100 million toward a national strategy for preventing gender-based violence. Advertisement Despite a few positive steps in the past 12 months, including changes to tenant and workplace laws in Ontario, it’s important not to overstate progress and how challenging and multifaceted the problem remains, advocates and academics say.“Every time someone asks me how do I better support (a sexual assault survivor) I think we are moving forward,” says Farrah Khan, the co-ordinator of sexual violence education and support at Ryerson University.“But there are still so many women who are sexually assaulted and they still face so much victim-blaming.” Facebook Twitter Advertisement Login/Register With: It has been a year since former CBC radio host Jian Ghomeshi was acquitted of sexually assaulting three women after a trial that led to national debate about the justice system’s handling of such cases, but sexual violence has remained in the spotlight. Advertisementlast_img read more

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CANADIAN ACTOR FINN WOLFHARD OF STRANGER THINGS EXITS APA OVER SEXUAL ALLEGATIONS

first_imgFinn Wolfhard – Photo by Ryan Gibson LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Twitter After two men came forward alleging that APA agent Tyler Grasham had sexually assaulted them, Stranger Things‘ Finn Wolfhard decided to leave the agency and his agent. This comes after APA said it had launched an internal investigation in Grasham who had been repping Wolfhard.A source close to Wolfhard told Deadline the reason the young actor left was because of those allegations.Earlier this week, former child actor Blaise Godbe Lipman shared allegations of an encounter 10 years ago with Grasham on Facebook. READ MOREcenter_img Advertisement Login/Register With: Facebook Advertisementlast_img

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We meant war not murder

first_img(Preceding photo believed to be of Klatsassin, war chief of Tsilhqot’in, played a lead role in the Chilcotin War of 1864. His name means, “We do not know his name.”)By Jorge BarreraAPTN National NewsResistance to a planned gold and copper mine in British Columbia’s interior echoes another conflict for the Tsilhqot’in people who are leading the fight to have the project stopped.It was a conflict that ended with the death of at least 19 European settlers and the hanging of six Tsilhqot’in chiefs.And like the Chilcotin War of 1864, the current battle with the planned Prosperty mine is over gold, says Xeni Gwet’in Chief Marilyn Baptiste, whose community is one of six that make up the Tsilhqot’in nation.“Our war leaders of 1864 were protecting and saving our land, our title, our rights, our fish and our waters,” said Baptiste. “Back then and now again, they are after gold.”Baptiste invoked the legacy of the Chilcotin War this week during a press conference in Ottawa while explaining the depth of opposition to the mine in her community.She said that many Tsilhqot’in people would sacrifice their lives to stop the Taseko-owned mine.The mine, which is expected to produce about $3 billion worth of gold and copper, would lead to the draining of a lake sacred to the Tsilhqot’in people.“Our war leaders, many generations ago, protected what we are protecting now and if it were not for them we would not be who we are,” said Baptiste.The mine, which has an expected lifespan of 33 years, has been approved by the B.C. government and now needs only the go-ahead from Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s cabinet to become a reality.The project, however, took a major blow this summer when a Canadian Environmental Review Agency panel found the mine would have a detrimental impact on the ecosystem and on First Nations communities who have lived in the region since time immemorial.The 35 square-kilometre mine would see the draining of rainbow trout-abundant Fish Lake which would be turned into a waste rock and low grade ore storage area.Nearby Little Fish Lake and parts of Fish Creek would also be destroyed and turned into a tailings pond.Taseko has pledged to build a replacement lake named Prosperity Lake to be stocked with replacement fish.The panel’s report will be one of several issues weighed by the federal cabinet in its decision on the future of the mine, which would sit about 125 kilometres southwest of Williams Lake, B.C. Williams Lake is about 495 kilometres north-east of Vancouver.When asked in Iqaluit this week for his views on the project and the position of the Tsilhqot’in, newly appointed Indian Affairs Minister John Duncan said cabinet confidentiality prevented him from commenting.“The project is subject to a cabinet consideration at this point and there’s cabinet confidentiality that floats around,” said Duncan. “We’ll know what the result of the process is when it’s announced and before that I’m really not in a position to be able to say anything.”Local Conservative MP Dick Harris has been vocal in his support of the mine and told local newspaper Williams Lake Tribune that the prime minister was “acutely aware of the importance” of the project to the local economy.Baptiste, however, said no amount of revenue would compensate for the destruction of an area described as “pristine” by the federal panel.“We are people connected to the land and the land is connected to us,” she said. “Our wild trout, our wild fish, our wild game that provides for our people as well as the berries and the medicine on our land, you cannot erase those things in our lives and replace it with crackers and soup mix.”Baptiste said the mine threatens to destroy an integral part of her people and its planned development is similar to what the Tsilhqot’in faced in the mid-1800s.Back then they faced a planned toll wagon road aimed at connecting the nascent colony’s Pacific coast through Bute Inlet to the newly discovered gold fields of Williams Creek, in the interior.The project threatened to upend the already besieged Tsilhqot’in people facing their first major outbreak of smallpox, spread in large part by infected blankets sold by traders.“These white people, they bring blankets from people who die of smallpox,” said former Tsilhqot’in chief Henry Solomon, in an oral account of the small pox outbreak contained in a book called Nemiah: The unconquered country, by Terry Glavine.“Then he wrap them up and he sell them to these Indians, then the Indian, he didn’t know, he just sleep on it, them blankets. Pretty soon he got them sickness, and pretty soon the whole camp got it. So pretty soon my grandmother and his sister, they’re the only one that survive.”Baptiste said the road plans worried Tsilhqot’in leaders at the time.“Our chiefs and our leaders back then were well aware that if we allowed those people coming through our territory after the gold . . . that they would destroy our fish, our waters,” she said.The road work began to cause friction with the Tsilhqot’in, even though some found jobs with the work crews.There were incidents of road workers raping Tsilhqot’in girls. The Tsilhqot’in who worked with the crews were mistreated and denied food.Then, in the spring of 1864, four bags of flour were stolen from a road crew’s base camp. The crew’s foreman threatened the Tsilhqot’in with smallpox for stealing.Journalist Melvin Rothenburger, who wrote a book called the The Chilcotin War, believes this threat may have helped spark the war.“That could have been an important factor because of the fear of smallpox and it had been rampant,” said Rothenburger, whose great-great grandfather Donald McLean was killed in the ensuing battles with the Tsilhqot’in.News of the smallpox threat and rapes stirred a group of Tsiloqot’in to launch what turned into a guerilla war against the settlers. Of this group, a war chief known as Klatsassin or Lhatasassine, meaning “We do not know his name,” came to embody the Chilcotin War.They fired their first shot on the morning of April 28, 1864. It killed a ferryman who refused Klatsassin and his party passage.The next morning, at daybreak, Klatsassin and his war party descended on the main work crew camp. The cook, tending the fire, was the first to be cut down by gunfire. The Tsilhqot’in then severed the ropes of the tents, shooting and stabbing nine of the crew members to death.Three managed to escape.The war party then moved to another camp. There, the foreman who issued the smallpox threat was killed along with three other men.The Tsilhqot’in used their knowledge of the rugged terrain to their advantage, setting traps, launching ambushes and eluding colonial parties for weeks that had been sent into the bush to track them down.Rothenburger’s greath-great grandfather McLean met his death after falling into a trap set by the Tsilhqot’in. McLean followed a trail of wood shavings carved by the Tsilhoqot’in that led to an ambush. McLean, known to the Tsilhqot’in as Samandlin, wore a breast plate for protection, said Rothenburger.“The Tsilhqot’in knew about this and set it up so they could get behind him,” said Rothenburger.With the colony ramping up efforts against the guerillas, the Tsilhqot’in sought to negotiate peace. Believing they had been granted immunity, Klatsassin and a group of chiefs travelled to meet with Frederick Seymour, then the governor of the colony of British Columbia.They were shackled in their sleep and taken prisoner. Klatsassin and four others were convicted of murder. They were hung at 7 a.m. in what is now Quesnel, B.C., on Oct. 26, 1864.Before he died Klatsassin famously said, “We meant war, not murder.”Two other Tsilhqot’in men also turned themselves in, offering to pay compensation for what they did. They were also arrested and sentenced to death. One managed to escape, but the other man named Ahan, was hung in New Westminster on July 18, 1865To this day, the Tsilhqot’in are still trying to recover his remains.In 1993, the judge in charge of the Cariboo-Chilcotin Justice Inquiry examining the relationship between First Nations and the B.C. justice system recommended the provincial government give the Tsilhqot’in chiefs a pardon.“There was genuine concern that the chiefs were induced to surrender and give inculpatory statements on a promise of immunity. . . Many natives still feel that the trial and hangings were more a showpiece to impress the natives than an honest search for truth,” wrote Judge Anthony Sarich. “That episode in history has left a wound in the body of Chilcotin society. It is time to heal that wound.”The provincial government apologized for the hangings in 1999.Baptiste said the guerrilla war launched by Klatsassin had a lasting impact on her community. She believes the legacy of the war protected Xeni Gwet’in, a community of about 400 people which sits about 250 kilometres west of Williams Lake, from serious encroachment.A highway did not link to her community until the early 1970s and they have chosen to stay off the BC Hydro electrical grid, generating their own power instead through a mix of generators, solar and hybrid system using propane and solar energy.“We have never signed a treaty and we never will,” she said.jbarrera@aptn.calast_img read more

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Alberta tarsands project wins regulator approval despite Metis objections

first_imgThe Canadian PressCALGARY – A northern Alberta tarsands project has been approved by the Alberta Energy Regulator over the objections of local Indigenous people who say it will encroach on sacred lands and poses a risk to their drinking water.The 10,000-barrel-per-day steam-driven Rigel tarsands project proposed by privately held Prosper Petroleum Ltd. of Calgary is in the public interest, the AER said in a decision posted on its website.Construction is expected to cost $390 million, with an additional $50 million to be spent on drilling and completing wells before startup.“Our plan is to start construction in Q4 of this year and we believe we can have it built and in operation in 2020,” said Prosper CEO Brad Gardiner.The project is being built with the support of partner Petrolama Namur Oil Sands Energy, a subsidiary of Czech Republic-based Lama Energy Group, as its first investment in the tarsands, he said.The Fort McKay Metis Community Association board will meet to discuss the decision and to formulate a response, executive director Eddison Lee-Johnson said Wednesday.“It’s close to a sacred place, Moose Lake, which the community has used for centuries and continues to use and this project is definitely going to affect that traditional and cultural use,” he said.In hearings earlier this year, the Metis group and the Fort McKay First Nation told the three-member AER panel that they oppose the development because it would come as close as 1.5 km to Moose Lake.The panel wrote in its decision that it accepts that tarsands development has raised fears of a loss of connection with the land with Fort McKay residents.“The fear expressed is genuine. What is missing is evidence that the Rigel project itself will cause a loss of connection and relationship,” it wrote, explaining that the operating Sunshine Oilsands project and exploration projects by other companies are also located nearby.Social and economic issues and potential impacts on Indigenous and treaty rights were considered in its decision, the AER says in the decision.However, it added it could not consider whether government consultation was adequate. Nor could it account for a provincial proposal to create an access management plan for the Moose Lake area because that plan hasn’t been implemented.The Fort McKay First Nation said it isn’t surprised by the approval and has started legal action against the government of Alberta and the AER.“The AER interprets its mandate very narrowly with respect to protecting our rights as Cree and Dene people,” Fort McKay First Nation Chief Jim Boucher said in a statement Monday night.“It dismissed the cumulative effects of the project and the constitutional promises made by the premiers of Alberta to enhance the protection of the Moose Lake area.”Prosper Petroleum, for its part, is committed to addressing its neighbours’ concerns, Gardiner said.“We have tried to design our project to minimize impact and their ability to practice traditional rights and we will continue to work with them as we go forward with the project,” he said.Canadian tarsands production is expected to rise by 58 per cent rise to 4.2 million barrels per day by 2035, according to the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers in its annual forecast released Tuesdoiay.The Rigel project would use steam injected into shallow horizontal wells to melt the heavy, sticky bitumen crude and allow it to drip into a parallel well to be pumped to the surface, where it would be transported by truck to a buyer or pipeline.It would employ up to six well-pads with eight well-pairs drilled from each pad, with an impact on 106 hectares of its total lease area of 768 hectares, and an expected production life of about 24 years.news@aptn.ca@aptnnewslast_img read more

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Montreal emerges as luxury real estate hot spot Sothebys report says

first_imgVANCOUVER – Montreal is emerging as a luxury real estate “hot spot,” while Vancouver and Toronto sales should pick up this fall after somewhat sluggish times, according to a new report.Sotheby’s International Realty Canada’s rosy outlook comes despite a slew of policy changes, including some from Ottawa and a couple provincial governments designed to cool the country’s hot housing markets. However, Canada’s strong economic performance will boost the market in the coming months, says the real estate sales and marketing company.“The psychological confidence that people had in the marketplace was shaken by all of the different factors that were put in there,” said Brad Henderson, CEO of Sotheby’s International Realty Canada, of a recent drop in sales in properties of more than $1 million in Toronto.In July and August, sales of condominiums and houses over $1 million in Toronto fell 27 per cent compared to the same months the year before, according to the report. Transactions of properties over $4 million in the city fell by nearly the same amount — 28 per cent.Part of that drop came as buyers and sellers in Ontario grappled with a new 15 per cent tax on foreign buyers of properties in the Greater Golden Horseshoe Region, which includes Toronto and several nearby areas, introduced by the provincial government in late April.Ontario followed British Columbia’s footsteps in the policy. The B.C. government implemented a similar levy on foreign buyers in the Metro Vancouver area in August 2016, and the province experienced a drop in luxury property sales shortly thereafter.In Vancouver, the report says, sales of luxury real estate over $1 million dropped 23 per cent in the first half of the year compared to 2016. But, sales increased five per cent during July and August, compared to the same months last year.Sotheby’s anticipated the Toronto market would pull back not only due to the impact of its foreign buyers’ tax, but also because of a move to stricter lending rules by the federal government last year, and two recent hikes in the benchmark interest rate from the Bank of Canada.While that tempered the psychological confidence in the Toronto market, Henderson said, it boosted people’s confidence in Quebec, where the provincial government has yet to intervene.In Montreal, sales of condominiums and homes over $1 million jumped 60 per cent year over year this July and August.Sotheby’s forecasts Montreal will “emerge as a strong leader on Canada’s luxury real estate landscape this fall,” according to the report.Henderson rejects the idea that growth is primarily coming from foreign buyers who have shifted away from the newly-taxed Vancouver and Toronto markets. Though, the report cites some anecdotal evidence of “an uptick in interest from foreign buyers seeking residences.”Instead, Montreal is an attractive place to live and work, Henderson said, with the added bonus of having comparatively less expensive real estate prices.Sotheby’s also anticipates “a brisk and active” market for luxury real estate in Toronto this fall and for Vancouver to regain momentum as a strong Canadian economy is expected to boost confidence and performance in the autumn months.In Calgary, the report says “tentative optimism is set to gain ground” as the city emerges from a recession.— Follow @AleksSagan on Twitter.last_img read more

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Statistics Canada reports wholesale sales up 07 per cent in November

first_imgOTTAWA – Statistics Canada says wholesale sales rose 0.7 per cent in November to $63.6 billion.The food, beverage and tobacco subsector led the increase, rising 1.9 per cent to $12.2 billion.Another major reason for the increase was the motor vehicle and parts subsector, which climbed 0.7 per cent to $12.0 billion.Sales were up in six of seven subsectors, representing 99 per cent of wholesale sales.In terms of volume, wholesale sales increased 0.5 per cent.Regionally, Ontario led the way as it saw sales climb 1.7 per cent to $32.9 billion in November, while sales in Quebec and British Columbia fell 0.5 per cent and 0.7 per cent respectively.last_img

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US factories grew again in January but a bit more slowly

first_imgWASHINGTON – American manufacturers expanded again last month, though more slowly than in December.The Institute for Supply Management, a trade group of purchasing managers, reported Thursday that its manufacturing index dipped to 59.1 in January from a revised 59.3 in December. But any reading above 50 signals growth, and U.S. factories have been expanding for 17 straight months.Among 18 manufacturing industries, 14 grew in January, led by textile mills and makers of fabricated metal products. Export orders grew faster, while manufacturers’ new orders, production and hiring increased more slowly.Overall, American industry remains strong, thanks in large part to a pickup in global economic growth and a weakening dollar, which makes U.S. products less costly in foreign markets.Last week, the Commerce Department said orders for long-lasting manufactured goods rose 2.9 per cent in December, the fastest pace since June, lifted by a surge in orders for commercial aircraft. Excluding the volatile transportation sector, durable goods orders still rose a healthy 0.6 per cent.The American economy as a whole appears to be generally healthy. Economic growth clocked in last year at 2.3 per cent, up from 1.5 per cent in 2016. Unemployment has dropped to a 17-year low 4.1 per cent.last_img read more

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Montreal to host annual world artificial intelligence summit through 2021

first_imgMONTREAL – Montreal has been selected to host a major artificial intelligence summit for at least three years.The London-based firm behind World Summit AI says the event between 2019 to 2021 follows the second edition currently taking place in Amsterdam.Quebec’s largest city has become a global hub for research and excellence in AI, with participation from McGill University and the University of Montreal, where AI pioneer Yoshua Bengio works.The city has attracted major digital players including Google, Microsoft, IBM, Samsung, Thales and Facebook, all of which have set up AI research labs.last_img

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UK business groups plead for deal to prevent nodeal Brexit

first_imgLONDON — Britain’s five leading business groups are pleading with the government to act to prevent the country’s departure from the European Union without a deal.In an unusual expression of unity, the groups that represent hundreds of thousands of businesses employing millions told the nation’s leaders to put their political party affiliations aside and prevent a so-called “no deal” Brexit.The statement says “businesses have been watching in horror as politicians have focused on factional disputes rather than practical steps that business needs to move forward. The lack of progress … means that the risk of a ‘no-deal’ Brexit is rising.”The statement was signed by the British Chambers of Commerce, the Confederation of British Industry, the manufacturers’ organization called EEF, the Federation of Small Businesses and the Institute of DirectorsThe Associated Presslast_img read more

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Japan says it will leave IWC to resume commercial whaling

first_imgTOKYO — Japan says it is leaving the International Whaling Commission to resume commercial hunts but says it will no longer go to the Antarctic to hunt.Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga said Wednesday that Japan’s commercial whaling will be limited to its territorial and economic waters.The IWC imposed a commercial moratorium in the 1980s due to a dwindling whale population. Japan switched to what it calls research whaling and says stocks have recovered enough to resume commercial hunt. The research program was criticized as a cover for commercial hunting as the meat is sold on the market at home.Japan has said the IWC has become more like an opponent of whaling than an organization aiming for sustainability.Japan has cut back on its catch as Japanese consume less whale meat.The Associated Presslast_img read more

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Snowplows ready for the snow in the North Peace

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – A snowfall warning remains in place for the B.C. Peace, and Yellowhead Road and Bridge is getting ready for up to 15 cm of snow.Temperatures are expected to drop overnight which will create the potential for ice.  On top of the ice, the North Peace could receive anywhere from 10 to 15cm of snow.  In the South Peace, some areas could see up to 20 cm, and in the Pine Pass, it could be as high as 25 cm.Yellowhead Road and Bridge maintain the highways in the North Peace say they have a full staff working over the weekend in anticipation of the forecast and will be plowing and sanding throughout the storm. Expected heavy snow tonight with accumulations reaching up to 10cm. YRB will have full staff working through the expected storm to ensure safe travel. Be sure to drive to conditions and check #drivebc for important updates. #hwy97 #yxj— YRB North Peace Ltd (@YRBNorthPeace) November 3, 2018The City of Fort St. John also shared their snow clearing crews are ready for the storm.For updates on the roads, visit www.drivebc.ca or follow YRB on Facebook and Twitter for updates on the storm.If you spot a hazard or road condition contact YRB at 1-888-883-6688.last_img read more

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The Province is seeking interested parties to fill gaps left by Greyhound

first_img* Hope to Princeton on Highway 3The ministry with the federal government and other provinces and territories are continuing discussions as part of an interprovincial working group. Trying to find a viable solution that is long-term to ensure people in B.C. continue to have access to safe and reliable ground transportation.To file for an application to the Passenger Transportation Board for an intercity bus licence CLICK HERE The Province is interested in parties that can provide innovative and flexible ground transportation services. Interested parties that respond to the RFEI are still required to apply to the Passenger Transportation Board for an intercity bus licence.The deadline for interested applicants is Jan. 15, 2019.The routes that the ministry is currently seeking expressions of interest for are as follows:* Cache Creek to Kamloops on Highway 1* Kamloops to Valemount on Highway 5* Valemount to B.C.-Alberta border on highways 5 and 16 VICTORIA, B.C. – After the withdrawal of Greyhound’s service in B.C., the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure is wanting to fill the eight intercity bus routes that remain unfilled by requesting expressions of interest (RFEI)When Greyhound announced its departure, the Ministry moved swiftly by fast-tracking applications from companies interested in providing service on abandoned routes. The result has been 83 percent coverage in part to private operators.The RFEI will help gauge interest coming from private sector operators, non-profit societies, community agencies, local governments, Indigenous communities or other interested parties.center_img * Dawson Creek to B.C.-Alberta border on Highway 2* Salmo to Creston on highways 3 and 6* Cranbrook to the B.C.-Alberta border on Highway 3* Fort Nelson to the B.C.-Yukon border on Highway 7last_img read more

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RCMP continue to investigate after man was swept away in the Peace

first_imgSaunderson adds that Search and Rescue have been suspended for now, pending any new developments on the case.On Wednesday, May 29, 2019, the Hudson’s Hope RCMP were called to a location near the Peace Canyon Bridge after reports that a male had fallen into the river. Local emergency crews immediately started the search with help from North Peace Search and Rescue.The RCMP will not be releasing the identity of the man.If you have any information, you are being asked to contact the Hudson’s Hope RCMP at 250-783-5241. HUDSON’S HOPE, B.C. – RCMP are continuing to investigate the case of a missing man after he was swept away by the strong current of the Peace River.According to Corporal Madonna Saunderson, of the North District RCMP, a dive team was brought in to search for the missing man but was halted due to poor conditions.“The Dive Team was brought in, however, conditions were not in their favour to dive, so they did not, could not dive.”last_img read more

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Fire Chief and Founder of Peace FM in Chetwynd passes away

first_imgCHETWYND, B.C. – A longtime member of the B.C. Peace passed away late Wednesday.Leo Sabulsky of Chetwynd passed away after battling cancer.  Sabulsky helped to launch Chetwynd’s only radio station Peace FM and later the TV station CHET TV.  Sabulsky was also the Fire Chief for the District of Chetwynd since 1998.The following was shared by Peace FM in Chetwynd: In the early evening of July 10th, 2019 – the most giving and tenacious man this world will ever know slipped away from us at the age of 67. Leo Sabulsky leaves behind his devoted and loving wife Janice and their three adoring children Aimee (Daniel and Maisee), Alesia (David, Mateus, Neves and Alyvia) and Michael (Tobi and Nicholas).Born and raised in Grindrod, BC – Leo grew up on the family farm with his father Nicholas, mother Mary and two siblings, Juanita and Dennis. Leo’s compassion and caring for animals was renowned and culminated in numerous awards through 4-H. In 1970 Leo was nationally recognized by 4-H Canada for his exemplary service and was awarded a two-month agriculture scholarship in Japan. Evident by his yearly display of flowers and vegetable filled greenhouse – Leo’s ability to reap harvest of greenery not suited for the region was always a testament to both his natural talent and obstinance.Leo was known far and wide as a selfless man whose sense of community knew no bounds. A man who,when told something couldn’t be done, went out and did it. This became part of who he was and he invited any opportunity to benefit those around him. An educator for 33-years, Leo had an unparalleled gift to connect and communicate with his students. His clever teaching style and passion for history, geography and agriculture is still spoken of with great fondness.As chairman of the Chetwynd Communications Society, Leo pursued his dream of creating Chetwynd’s own radio station. In 1997 he obtained the first “Class A” community radio licence in Canada and thus began the journey of CHET FM. Leo’s pursuits did not end there as he spearheaded the creation of CHET TV, CHAD FM and eventually all that would be known as Peace FM. Leo loved supporting the community and in particular, entertaining listeners with his weekly radio show, Leo & Friends.Leo first got a taste for firefighting at the age of 16 as a summer student with the BC Wildfire Service. He joined the Salmon Arm Volunteer Fire Department in 1976 and in 1977 upon arrival to Chetwynd joined the Chetwynd Volunteer Fire Department. Leo became Fire Chief in 1994 and remained so until his retirement in June 2019. Leo had an exceptional attendance record, even at the height of his illness and was known for his unconventional tactics and unending resolve. Leo’s call to service was tantamount to who he was. This community has lost an amazing teacher, a dear friend and a true hero.A memorial for Leo will be announced later this month. Should you wish to honour Leo’s name, donations can be made in his memory to the Kordyban Lodge in Prince George or the BC SPCA. The Sabulsky family actively encourages you to share your most cherished memories of Leo to assist us all in these times of grief.last_img read more

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