DeGroote Professor Workplace Policy Helps Shape New Law and More Toronto News

first_img Last Updated Apr 27, 2018 by Jillian MarkowitzFacebookTwitterLinkedinemail regions: Toronto This week, Toronto business schools discuss substantial contributions to the workplace, researchers from DeGroote and Ryerson have each worked to make workplaces more just and equitable, and a new book by Rotman professors gives practical tools for incorporating AI into business.Doing Right By Employees Ultimately Pays Off – McMaster Brighter WorldResearch from Isik Zeytinoglu, professor of human resources and management at McMaster University’s DeGroote School of Business, has shown that treating employees well may be a shrewd move for employers. Dr. Zeytinoglu, whose research influenced the World Health Organization’s WHO Healthy Workplace Framework, has been touting the benefits of a healthy relationship between employers and workers for over 30 years. The Fair Workplaces, Better Jobs Act, which came into effect at the beginning of April, had many benefits and protections for workers, including a requirement that part-time and temp employees must receive the same pay as full-time staff for the same work.“In the long term, equity helps society, the community, and the economy,” Zeytinoglu said. “Throughout history, there have been employers who considered fairness and behaved justly toward their workers, and they are the ones who have prospered.” It is no coincidence that the new law aligns with much of Zeytinoglu’s research; in fact, the government consulted the professor during the bill’s formative stages.Read more about the new bill and Zeytinoglu’s work here. These Are the Workplace Gender Equity Tactics That Actually Work – Canadian BusinessThis week, professors at Ryerson University’s Ted Rogers School of Management, Martin Fabro and Chris MacDonald, wrote an article on gender equity for Canadian Business; a follow-up to one the authors wrote in late March, “A Seven-Step Plan To Improve Gender Diversity At Any Company.” While the first piece offered actionable instructions to improve gender diversity, Fabro and MacDonald focused their follow-up on which of the most popular gender diversity tactics were rooted in evidence-based practices.The Ryerson researchers explored which gender equity practices helped to either, “actively improve gender diversity (and in particular to increase the number of women in leadership roles), and to reduce underlying gender bias and discriminatory attitudes within the organizational culture.”Learn more about improving gender equity in the workplace here.PREDICTION MACHINES: The Simple Economics of Artificial Intelligence – Rotman New ReleasesIn their new book, PREDICTION MACHINES: The Simple Economics of Artificial Intelligence, Ajay Agrawal, Joshua Gans, and Avi Goldfarb took on the task of theorizing the possible role of artificial intelligence in business. In the past, the possible effects of AI on business seemed so vast, they were difficult to tackle. Agrawal, Gans, and Goldfarb demystify AI, by re-framing it as a prediction tool.“More than just an account of AI’s powerful capabilities, PREDICTION MACHINES shows managers how they can most effectively leverage AI, disrupting business as usual only where required, and provides businesses with a toolkit to navigate the coming wave of challenges and opportunities.”A book launch was held at the Rotman School of Management on April 16.You can read more about PREDICTION MACHINES here. About the AuthorJillian MarkowitzView more posts by Jillian Markowitz center_img RelatedDeGroote School of Business Dean Leonard Waverman Re-AppointedSince January 2013, Leonard Waverman has been the Dean of the McMaster’s DeGroote School of Business. Due to his accomplished service, the Board of Governors re-appointed Waverman as Dean starting July 1. “Dean Waverman has accomplished much in his time at McMaster, launching the new Executive MBA program in Digital…August 1, 2017In “Featured Region”Millennial Men Taking on Parental Leave, and More – Toronto NewsToronto’s finest business schools have been contributing to social, political, and scientific advances this week. We’ve laid out the highlights below. How Testosterone May Be Influencing Men’s Purchasing Decisions – The Globe and Mail Nature Communications recently published research from Western University Canada’s Ivey Business School that explored the relationship…September 6, 2018In “Featured Home”Trudeau Comes to Rotman, Trump Tariffs Addressed, and More – Toronto NewsToronto business schools have seen some exciting news this week, and we’ve collected some of the highlights. DeGroote Professor Talks Tariffs on CTV — CHCH.com CTV recently interviewed Marvin Ryder, assistant professor at McMaster University’s DeGroote School of Business, regarding U.S. President Donald Trump’s proposal to place tariffs on aluminum…March 9, 2018In “Featured Home” DeGroote Professor Workplace Policy Helps Shape New Law, and More -Toronto Newslast_img read more

Read More »

GMAT Scores International Students Jump at NYU Stern

first_img Related regions: New York City Last Updated Jul 26, 2018 by Jonathan PfefferFacebookTwitterLinkedinemail GMAT Scores, International Students Jump at NYU Sterncenter_img About the AuthorJonathan PfefferJonathan Pfeffer joined the Clear Admit and MetroMBA teams in 2015 after spending several years as an arts/culture writer, editor, and radio producer. In addition to his role as contributing writer at MetroMBA and contributing editor at Clear Admit, he is co-founder and lead producer of the Clear Admit MBA Admissions Podcast. He holds a BA in Film/Video, Ethnomusicology, and Media Studies from Oberlin College.View more posts by Jonathan Pfeffer Last week, the NYU Stern School of Business shared a preliminary profile of its Class of 2020. Even amid some declines, the school showed gains in the diversity of its class and added a few points to the average GMAT score for incoming students.This year saw 3,781 applicants—down from 3,927 for the Class of 2019. Among the new applicants, 876 were admitted (23 percent) and a total of 375 enrolled. Last year, 822 applicants were admitted (21 percent), yielding 402 enrolled students.Although the percentage of female students dropped slightly from the previous year (38 to 35 percent), the Class of 2020 is more global than the Class of 2019. International students increased from 37 percent last year to 39 percent, even as overall international MBA application volume to U.S. schools faltered. “International applications were down about 10 percent this year, but they still represent about half of total applications, so we had a very strong pool of applications from which to admit,” an NYU spokesperson says.The percentage of minority students held steady at 29 percent—the same as the previous year. But of those, 13 percent this year are underrepresented minorities (U.S. citizens and permanent residents who identify as African American/Black, Hispanic, or Native American/Alaskan Native), up 2 percentage points over the Class of 2019.The average GMAT score for incoming students this year increased to 717—a three-point gain over the previous class. However, the median GMAT maintained the same score as the previous class, sitting at 720. At the same time, applicants opting to submit GRE scores instead of GMAT scores jumped from 12 to 19 percent, while the average GPA slipped slightly from 3.48 to 3.45.The NYU Stern Class of 2020 sported a 717 GMAT average; three points higher than the previous class.The Class of 2020 has a diverse educational background. Approximately 29 percent of students studied business as undergrads, more than any other major. Another 20 percent of the incoming class have degrees in engineering, math, and science. Economics, humanities, and social sciences majors make up the rest of the class, totaling 18 percent, 17 percent, and 16 percent, respectively.Stern also continued its efforts to recruit military veterans and active duty service members, including through the Fertitta Veterans Program. Now in its second year, the program underwrites more than half of the tuition bill for approximately 20 incoming students annually. Veterans and active duty service members comprise 7 percent of the Class of 2020, similar to last year.The average work experience among incoming students increased from 4.9 years for the Class of 2019 to to 5.3 years this year. More than a quarter—26 percent—of the Class of 2020 comes in with previous experience working in financial services, and another 13 percent come from consulting. The three next largest feeder industries are technology, entertainment/media, and military/government, making up 9 percent, 7 percent, and 7 percent, respectively. With regard to post-MBA career aspirations, members of the Class of 2020 are increasingly interested in consulting, technology, entrepreneurship, and healthcare.Click here or more information on the NYU Stern Class of 2020.This article has been edited and republished with permissions from our sister site, Clear Admit.last_img read more

Read More »

Great Expectations Small Businesses Upbeat About 2017

first_img Share this article NEW YORK—Donald Trump’s election as president has made many small business owners more upbeat about 2017.Dean Bingham says he’s cautiously optimistic because business picked up at his auto repair shop after the election—people who had put off fixing their cars have decided it’s time to get them serviced.“Over the last month, customers have been coming in with optimism that they didn’t have the last few years,” says Bingham, owner of a Mr. Transmission/Milex franchise in Greenville, South Carolina.The shop has been so busy Bingham’s looking to hire a seventh employee to help out in the front while he works on cars.While many business owners are more confident because their revenue looks to increase in 2017 due to the overall improving economy, they’re also optimistic because they expect Trump to deliver on promises to lower taxes and roll back regulations including parts of the health care law. But owners may not be expecting overnight relief—many recognize it will take time to see what the administration’s plans are, and what it will accomplish.Business owners were considerably more optimistic about 2017 in a survey taken shortly after the election. Forty-six percent of the 600 questioned in the Wells Fargo survey said the operating environment for their companies would improve next year; that compares to 30 percent two years ago, after the last congressional elections. Just over half the owners said actions that Trump and Congress will take next year will make their companies better off. Twenty-six percent said the government’s actions would have no effect, and 17 percent said their businesses would be worse off. Nick Braun expects his pet insurance business to benefit because he thinks consumers will feel more comfortable about buying nonessentials like health coverage for their pets.Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump leads a Hispanic leaders and small business owners roundtable in Las Vegas on Aug. 26, 2016. Left is Pastor Pasqual Urrabazo, of the International Church of Las Vegas, and right is Irma Aguirre, a local business owner. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert) Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump leads a Hispanic leaders and small business owners roundtable in Las Vegas on Aug. 26, 2016. Left is Pastor Pasqual Urrabazo, of the International Church of Las Vegas, and right is Irma Aguirre, a local business owner. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)“I truly believe that 2017 will not only be a great year for our business, but the U.S. economy in general,” says Braun, whose company, PetInsuranceQuotes.com, is based in Columbus, Ohio.Braun thinks promised changes to the health care law will be one factor encouraging consumers to spend on things that aren’t their top priorities. He’s also hoping that changes to the law will make it easier for him to buy insurance for his six staffers, which he provides even though the law doesn’t require him to. He says he’s had to change carriers several times because many insurance companies haven’t wanted to write policies for small businesses.Related CoverageStreet Closures Around Trump Tower Reduced to Help Local BusinessesSome companies that cater to other small businesses see the hopefulness in their customers, and it’s infectious.“The election does give me more optimism than I would have had otherwise,” says Kurt Steckel, CEO of Bison Analytics, which does software consulting. Bison’s inquiries from prospective clients, small companies that are looking to expand, have nearly doubled since the election.Steckel is also upbeat about an overhaul of the health care law. He says the cost of his small group insurance rose sharply when the law went into effect, and he had to stop offering coverage to his 10 staffers. He says if insurance were to become more affordable, he’d restore coverage.Among the other laws and regulations that small business advocacy groups want to see eliminated or changed are the Department of Labor’s overtime rules that were scheduled to go into effect Dec. 1, but were put on hold by a federal court in Texas. Trump’s nominee for labor secretary, fast-food company CEO Andy Puzder, opposes the regulations.Andy Puzder, CEO of CKE Restaurants Holdings, Inc. attends the Dream Foundation's 14th Annual Celebration of Dreams Gala in Goleta, California on Nov. 7, 2015. (Jesse Grant/Getty Images for Dream Foundation) Andy Puzder, CEO of CKE Restaurants Holdings, Inc. attends the Dream Foundation’s 14th Annual Celebration of Dreams Gala in Goleta, California on Nov. 7, 2015. (Jesse Grant/Getty Images for Dream Foundation)“The decision to appoint Puzder as labor secretary is a big indication that there’s going to be a significant rollback of Obama administration initiatives,” says James Hammerschmidt, a labor and business lawyer with the firm Paley Rothman in Bethesda, Maryland.Federal laws and regulations are only part of the requirements that small businesses must comply with—state and local governments in some parts of the country have more stringent laws and rules. For example, while the federal minimum wage is $7.25 an hour, many states and some cities have a higher minimum, with plans to raise it to as much as $15.“Small business owners whose companies are located in more progressive jurisdictions or operate across local or state borders will have to deal with a patchwork of local and state employment laws that may be difficult, time-consuming and likely aggravating to navigate,” Hammerschmidt says.Related CoverageReport: Obama Might Enter the Media BusinessMany owners may be cautious in the first half of 2017 while they wait to see what the government does, particularly with health care, says Walt Jones, owner of a management consulting business, SEQ Advisory Group, whose clients include small companies. He also expects owners who do business with the government wait to see if federal agencies increase the number of contracts they award to small companies.Jones is optimistic that Trump’s pledge to improve the country’s roads and other parts of its infrastructure will mean more government contracts, and in turn, more business for his company.“As long as the administration sticks to the promises he (Trump) made during the campaign, I definitely see opportunities for small businesses,” Jones says. Great Expectations: Small Businesses Upbeat About 2017 By The Associated Press December 28, 2016 Updated: December 28, 2016 President-elect Donald Trump and Andy Puzder, chief executive of CKE Restaurants, shake hands as Puzder leaves Trump National Golf Club Bedminster clubhouse in Bedminster, N.J., on Nov. 19, 2016. Trump has tapped Puzder as his pick to head the Labor Department. Trump’s election as president has made many small business owners more upbeat about 2017. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File) Show Discussioncenter_img Share  LINKEDINPINTERESTREDDITTUMBLRSTUMBLEUPON   Politics last_img read more

Read More »

ICE Most Wanted Fugitive Found Captured in New Jersey

first_imgJavier Atlixqueno-Vaquero (ICE.gov) ICE ‘Most Wanted Fugitive’ Found, Captured in New Jersey By Jack Phillips February 2, 2017 Updated: February 2, 2017 US Share this article Sharecenter_img  LINKEDINPINTERESTREDDITTUMBLRSTUMBLEUPON   One of the “most wanted” fugitives was captured by the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement this week, according to an ICE release on Tuesday.Javier Atlixqueno-Vaquero, a citizen of Mexico, was arrested on Tuesday night after ICE agents saw him leaving his residence in New Jersey. He’s a convicted felon for the crimes of sexual assault with a minor, felony sale of hallucinogen/narcotic controlled substance, and felony failure to appear.The 37-year-old was ordered removed by an immigration judge on May 7, 2004, and he was sent back to Mexico later that month.But he later re-entered the United States, though it is not known when, ICE’s release stated.Related CoverageUnion-Backed Ronald Vitiello Named to Lead Border Patrol “Protecting national security, public safety and our borders by identifying and removing dangerous criminal fugitives from our communities is the top priority of our fugitive operations teams,” said John Tsoukaris, the field office director of the Enforcement and Removal Operations in Newark, New Jersey.He added: “A convicted felon and one of our most wanted fugitives; Mr. Atlixqueno-Vaquero is a threat no more and is in custody awaiting removal from the United States. I commend the hard work and dedication of our officers.”Since October 2009, the ERO has removed some 1,700 foreign fugitives from the United States. They were sought in their home countries for a litany of crimes, including kidnapping, rape, and murder. Show Discussionlast_img read more

Read More »

US Restricts Electronics From 10 Airports Mainly in Middle East

first_img  LINKEDINPINTERESTREDDITTUMBLRSTUMBLEUPON   A passenger walks to his gate at Cairo International Airport. (REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh) Share this article Share US center_img WASHINGTON—The Trump administration on Tuesday imposed restrictions on carry-on electronic devices on planes coming to the United States from 10 airports in Muslim-majority countries in the Middle East and North Africa in response to terrorism threats.The Department of Homeland Security said passengers traveling from those airports could not bring devices larger than a cellphone, such as tablets, portable DVD players, laptops and cameras, into the main cabin. Instead, they must be in checked baggage.The new restrictions were prompted by reports that militant groups want to smuggle explosive devices in electronic gadgets, officials told reporters on a conference call on Monday.The airports are in Cairo; Istanbul; Kuwait City; Doha, Qatar; Casablanca, Morocco; Amman, Jordan; Riyadh and Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; and Dubai and Abu Dhabi in United Arab Emirates.Officials said the decision had nothing to do with President Donald Trump’s efforts to impose a travel ban on six majority-Muslim nations. DHS spokeswoman Gillian Christensen said the government “did not target specific nations. We relied upon evaluated intelligence to determine which airports were affected.”On March 6, Trump signed a revised executive order barring citizens from Iran, Libya, Syria, Somalia, Sudan and Yemen from traveling to the United States for 90 days. Two federal judges have halted parts of the ban, claiming it discriminates against Muslims. Trump has vowed to appeal up to the Supreme Court if necessary. The airports affected by the electronics rules are served by nine airlines that fly directly from those cities to the United States about 50 flights a day, senior government officials said.The carriers—Royal Jordanian Airlines, Egypt Air, Turkish Airlines, Saudi Arabian Airlines, Kuwait Airways, Royal Air Maroc, Qatar Airways, Emirates and Etihad Airways—have until Friday to comply with the new policy, which took effect early on Tuesday and will be in place indefinitely.Several of the carriers, including Turkish Airlines, Etihad and Qatar, said early on Tuesday that they were quickly moving to comply. Royal Jordanian and Saudi Airlines said on Monday that they were immediately putting the directive into place.An Emirates spokeswoman said the new security directive would last until Oct. 14. However, Christensen termed that date “a placeholder for review” of the rule.The policy does not affect any American carriers because none fly directly to the United States from the airports, officials said.Officials did not explain why the restrictions only apply to travelers arriving in the United States and not for those same flights when they leave from there.The rules do apply to U.S. citizens traveling on those flights, but not to crew members on those foreign carriers. Homeland Security will allow passengers to use larger approved medical devices.Related Coverage10 Ridiculous Things Passengers Thought the TSA Wouldn’t NoticeAngela Gittens, director general of airport association ACI World, likened the move to years-long restrictions of liquids on planes, which she said also came suddenly, in response to a perceived threat, and caused some disruption.Airlines will adjust to the electronics policy, she said. “The first few days of something like this are quite problematic, but just as with the liquids ban, it will start to sort itself out.”DHS said the procedures would “remain in place until the threat changes” and did not rule out expanding them to other airports.The agency said in a statement it “seeks to balance risk with impacts to the traveling public and has determined that cellphones and smartphones will be allowed in accessible property at this time.”Related CoverageFive States Challenge Trump’s New Travel BanThe government said it was “concerned about terrorists’ ongoing interest in targeting commercial aviation, including transportation hubs over the past two years.”Reuters reported Monday that the move had been under consideration since the U.S. government learned of a threat several weeks ago.U.S. officials have told Reuters the information gleaned from a U.S. commando raid in January in Yemen that targeted al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula included bombmaking techniques.Related CoverageEmirates, Etihad Boarding as Usual After Second Trump Travel Ban BlockedAQAP, based in Yemen, has plotted to down U.S. airliners and claimed responsibility for 2015 attack on the office of Charlie Hebdo magazine in Paris.The group claimed responsibility for a Dec. 25, 2009, failed attempt by a Nigerian Islamic terrorist to down an airliner over Detroit. The device, hidden in the underwear of the man, Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab, failed to detonate.In 2010, security officials in Britain and Dubai intercepted parcel bombs sent from Yemen to the United States.The Homeland Security Department stepped up security of U.S.-bound flights in July 2014, requiring tougher screening of mobile phones and other electronic devices and requiring them to be powered up before passengers could board flights to the United States. Show Discussion US Restricts Electronics From 10 Airports, Mainly in Middle East By Reuters March 21, 2017 Updated: March 21, 2017last_img read more

Read More »

California Man Pleads Guilty in Murder of Son 5

first_img Share this article US California Man Pleads Guilty in Murder of Son, 5 By Jack Phillips August 2, 2017 Updated: August 2, 2017 Share Show Discussioncenter_img A California man has pleaded guilty to the murder of his 5-year-old son—months after the boy was reported missing by his mother.Aramazd Andressian Sr., 35, of South Pasedena, pleaded guilty in court on Tuesday to one count of murdering Aramazd Andressian Jr.—nearly one month after investigators found the boy’s body near Lake Cacuma in Santa Barbara County. In his court appearance, he stayed calm and serious, CNN reported.Andressian’s attorney, Ambrosio Rodriguez, said that his client is “beyond words in regretting” killing the child. He added that his client told police about the location of his son’s remains.He now faces 25 years to life in prison. His sentencing date is Aug. 23, the Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Office stated, according to KTLA. (Police handout)His son, known as “Piqui,” was reported missing in April by his mother, Ana Estevez, two days after he and his father went to Disneyland. Police say Estevez and Andressian Sr. were embroiled in a divorce and custody over the son. Andressian Sr. may have killed the child in retaliation, they said.In a police report cited by KTLA, Andressian Sr. told police that he had harmed the boy and left him in Santa Barbara County.“This is a tragedy. Cases like this really tug at your heartstrings,” Deputy District Attorney Craig Hum said outside court, as reported by CBS News.  LINKEDINPINTERESTREDDITTUMBLRSTUMBLEUPON   Aramazd Andressian Jr. (Police handout)last_img read more

Read More »

New US Travel Ban on 8 Countries Is Indefinite and Tailored

first_img  LINKEDINPINTERESTREDDITTUMBLRSTUMBLEUPON   Share this article A U.S. Customs and Border Protection agent. New travel restrictions announced Sept. 24, 2017, will bar almost all citizens from seven countries to the United States indefinitely. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images) US News Show Discussioncenter_img Share WASHINGTON—New, more refined travel restrictions were issued in a proclamation by President Donald Trump late Sept. 24.Citing national security threats, Trump placed limits on citizens from eight countries traveling to the United States.Almost all citizens of Chad, Iran, Libya, North Korea, Syria, Somalia, and Yemen will be banned indefinitely from entering the United States as of Oct. 18. Some Venezuelan citizens will be restricted, and Iraq citizens will not be subject to restrictions, but will face heightened scrutiny.Chad, North Korea, and Venezuela are new to the list. The other countries had been named in Trump’s original 90-day visa ban announced in January and again in March in the revised version following a court injunction that blocked the original ban. Restrictions were lifted on Sudan, which was also named in previous bans.Each of the eight countries has tailor-made restrictions, but citizens from most of them will be unable to emigrate under the new ban. Travelers at a security checkpoint inside Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport in Arlington, Va., on Dec. 22, 2016. (SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images) The new rules do not apply to legal permanent residents of the United States, and visas already issued to citizens from those countries will not be revoked. Once the nonimmigrant visas expire, however, they will be subject to the new restrictions.“Following an extensive review by the Department of Homeland Security, we are taking action today to protect the safety and security of the American people by establishing a minimum security baseline for entry into the United States,” Trump said in a statement on Sept. 24.“We cannot afford to continue the failed policies of the past, which present an unacceptable danger to our country. My highest obligation is to ensure the safety and security of the American people.”The Immigration and Nationality Act states that the president may “suspend the entry of all aliens or any class of aliens” whenever he “finds that the entry of any aliens or of any class of aliens into the United States would be detrimental to the interests of the United States.”Review ProcessThe Department of Homeland Security (DHS) reviewed almost 200 countries between March and July to identify those that needed to provide more information with visa applications to satisfy U.S. authorities that the individual is not a security or public-safety threat.One criterion was document integrity—for example, whether a country issued passports with an embedded chip or not, or whether the country could provide evidence that their citizens are who they say they are.Other criteria include whether the country is a known or potential terrorist safe haven; whether it is a participant in the Visa Waiver Program; and whether it regularly fails to receive its nationals who are subject to orders of removal from the United States.The DHS initially identified 16 countries as being “inadequate” and 31 additional countries as “at risk” of becoming “inadequate” based on those criteria.The State Department then spent 50 days engaging with those countries to help them meet the criteria and avoid travel restrictions.“Those engagements yielded significant improvements in many countries,” the proclamation states. “Twenty-nine countries, for example, provided travel document exemplars for use by Department of Homeland Security officials to combat fraud. Eleven countries agreed to share information on known or suspected terrorists.”ExceptionsOfficials said waivers can be granted on a case-by-case basis if denying entry would cause the foreign national undue hardship, and if allowing entry would not pose a threat to the national security or public safety of the United States, and if entry would be in the national interest.Individuals with close family ties in the United States could be exempt from the restrictions.More than 1 million immigrants from more than 150 countries are provided with permanent residency in the United States every year, with a path to citizenship, according to DHS.The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services has an asylum backlog of more than 270,000 people.Many of those immigrating and traveling to the United States come from areas with serious terrorism concerns, significant instability, substantial stresses on public systems, and other security and safety threats, the administration said.“The restrictions and limitations imposed by this proclamation are, in my judgment, necessary to prevent the entry of those foreign nationals about whom the United States Government lacks sufficient information to assess the risks they pose to the United States,” Trump said.The travel restrictions can be lifted from the countries at any time, once the criteria have been satisfactorily met, he said.8 Countries With Restrictions*The restrictions distinguish between immigrants and nonimmigrants, mostly because immigrant visas lead to lawful permanent resident status. “Lawful permanent residents are more difficult to remove than nonimmigrants even after national security concerns arise, which heightens the costs and dangers of errors associated with admitting such individuals,” the proclamation states.North Korea, SyriaImmigrant and nonimmigrant entries are suspended.Chad, Libya, YemenImmigrant entries are suspended. Nonimmigrants on business (B-1), tourist (B-2), and business/tourist (B-1/B-2) visas are suspended.IranImmigrant entries are suspended. Nonimmigrant entries are suspended, except those with valid student (F and M) and exchange visitor (J) visas—although they’re subject to enhanced vetting.SomaliaImmigrant entries are suspended. Nonimmigrant visa adjudications are subject to additional scrutiny.VenezuelaOfficials of government agencies involved in screening and vetting procedures and their immediate family members, as nonimmigrants on business (B-1), tourist (B-2), and business/tourist (B-1/B-2) visas are suspended.  Other visa holders are subject to additional measures to ensure traveler information remains current.*IraqWhile citizens of Iraq do not face travel restrictions, travelers are subject to additional scrutiny. Follow Charlotte on Twitter: @charlottecuthbo New US Travel Ban on 8 Countries Is Indefinite and Tailored Trump adds North Korea, Chad, and Venezuela to the list; Sudan gets reprieveBy Charlotte Cuthbertson September 25, 2017 Updated: September 28, 2017last_img read more

Read More »

Car Collectors Rare Cars Burn Away in California Wildfires

first_img Share this article  LINKEDINPINTERESTREDDITTUMBLRSTUMBLEUPON   Car Collector’s Rare Cars Burn Away in California Wildfires By Colin Fredericson October 21, 2017 Updated: October 21, 2017 Show Discussion Car collector Gary Dower speaks with neighbors at his fire-destroyed home in Santa Rosa, Calif., on Oct. 20, 2017. (Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images) center_img US News A man showed before and after pictures of his rare car collection that burned as the wildfire passed through his neighborhood.After residents were allowed to return home, Gary Dower was able to access the results of the fire that burned his pricey collection of rare cars. He returned to the Oct. 20 devastation and posted photos of the charred metal remains online, the Daily Mail reported. He contrasted the car remains with the pre-fire car photos still on his cellphone. Car collector Gary Dower holds up a photo showing his classic Camaro before it burned at his home in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Oct. 20, 2017. (Josh Edekson/AFP/Getty Images)The most expensive of the vehicles was a 1967 Chevrolet Camaro, valued at over $70,000. The other cars include a 1992 Dodge Stealth, a 2010 Dodge Challenger SRT8 Limited Edition, and a 1973 MGB Roadster.The multiple wildfires that started this month and are still burning in California have killed 42 people. They also caused over $1 billion in damage to uninsured property. Some people are still on missing persons lists, although most are just people that lost contact with their families or didn’t alert police they were evacuating, according to the Daily Mail. Car collector Gary Dower holds up a photo showing his 2010 Dodge Challenger Limited Edition SRT8 before it burned at his home in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Oct. 20, 2017. (Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images) Another car collector was more fortunate to have saved a collection of vintage BMWs, some that couldn’t even drive anymore. Members from the BMW Car Club of America helped him move the collection from his vineyard to safer territory before fires moved in. The cars that were still able to drive were driven, and the ones too old to move on their own were put on tractors and driven to safety, Road & Track reported. Car collector Gary Dower displays a photo showing his 1973 MGB Roadster before it burned at his home in Santa Rosa, Calif., on Oct. 20, 2017. (Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images)Jeff Hecox, a car restorer that helped with the rescue, described the intense scene.“We were sitting there loading cars when five firetrucks drove to the end of the street and were staging 400 feet away,” Hecox said to Road & Track. “You could hear the aircraft flying by, the helicopters carrying water. When I first got there, you couldn’t see the sky. You look at that, it’s your worst nightmare happening.” Car collector Gary Dower holds up a photo showing his 1992 Dodge Stealth before it burned at his home in Santa Rosa, Calif., on Oct. 20, 2017. (Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images)From NTD.tv Sharelast_img read more

Read More »

Share

first_img Share Show Discussion  LINKEDINPINTERESTREDDITTUMBLRSTUMBLEUPON   Supreme Court Weighs US Right to Detain Criminal Aliens Long After Prison By Matthew Vadum October 11, 2018 Updated: October 11, 2018 The government loses the right under federal immigration law to detain for deportation proceedings a lawful permanent resident convicted of a serious crime, if it fails to arrest the person the day he completes his criminal sentence, an ACLU lawyer told the assembled justices of the Supreme Court.It is “appropriate” for the government to detain the person “the same day,” Cecillia D. Wang, deputy legal director of the American Civil Liberties Union, said Oct. 10 during oral arguments before the court. Wang previously worked for left-leaning Justice Stephen Breyer.The ACLU is the left-wing civil-rights group that spent more than $1 million opposing the nomination of Justice Brett Kavanaugh, who participated in the oral arguments. It was Kavanaugh’s second day of hearing cases at the Supreme Court after being confirmed by the Senate on Oct. 6.The case comes from California, a hotbed of resistance to President Donald Trump’s drive to enforce the nation’s immigration laws and to undermine the practice of cities declaring themselves sanctuaries that harbor illegal aliens.The enforcement of long-neglected immigration laws is a priority of the Trump administration, which has intensified immigration-enforcement efforts in California.California isn’t lifting a finger to help. The state now largely forbids cooperation with federal immigration authorities, presumably a violation of the U.S. Constitution’s Supremacy Clause. State law there now imposes drastic restrictions on communications between local police and federal immigration authorities, including information regarding when criminal aliens are scheduled to be released from local jails. For years, jailers in California and in other sanctuary jurisdictions have been refusing to honor requests from U.S. Immigration Customs and Enforcement (ICE), a division of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), to continue to detain persons scheduled to be released, pending transfer to ICE.In a high-profile case, felon and serial deportee Jose Ines Garcia Zarate was charged with killing Kate Steinle, 32, on a tourist-packed pier on July 1, 2015, after then-San Francisco Sheriff Ross Mirkarimi, a Democrat, defied an ICE detainer notice and put the Mexican national back on the streets.There was widespread outrage when the defendant was acquitted on serious charges and convicted by a state jury on a mere charge of unlawfully possessing a firearm. Trump spoke of the case repeatedly on the campaign trail.ImmediacyThe case heard by the Supreme Court was an appeal of a decision rendered Aug. 4, 2016, by the oft-overturned U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. The Supreme Court agreed to review the case on March 19 of this year at the request of the federal government.With few exceptions, a federal legal provision cited as 8 U.S.C. § 1226(c) directs the government to detain for removal proceedings green-card holders immediately upon completion of their sentences for serious crimes.The relevant part of the law states the U.S. “shall take into custody any alien who … is inadmissible by reason of having committed any offense covered in section 1182(a)(2) of this title,” which covers crimes of “moral turpitude,” as well as attempts or conspiracies to commit such crimes.Aliens convicted of other serious crimes, including those for which the person “has been sentenced to a term of imprisonment of at least 1 year,” shall be deemed deportable and taken into custody “when the alien is released, without regard to whether the alien is released on parole, supervised release, or probation, and without regard to whether the alien may be arrested or imprisoned again for the same offense.”In the opinion that gave rise to the case at hand, the Ninth Circuit ruled immigration law “unambiguously imposes mandatory detention without bond only on those aliens taken … into immigration custody ‘when [they are] released’ from criminal custody. And because Congress’s use of the word ‘when’ conveys immediacy, we conclude that the immigration detention must occur promptly upon the aliens’ release from criminal custody.”The government rejects this immediacy argument, arguing in a court brief dated Sept. 5, that it’s common sense “that important governmental action is better late than never.” The brief approvingly cites a 2013 case in which the Third Circuit held “[b]ureaucratic inaction—whether the result of inertia, oversight, or design—should not rob the public of statutory benefits.”The entire purpose of the law under attack “is to protect the public from criminal aliens by keeping them detained during their removal proceedings, without the prospect of release.”The Meaning of ‘When’But what happens if, contrary to the requirements of the law, the government fails to arrest potentially deportable criminal aliens when they complete their sentences?The court heard a litany of examples of bureaucratic incompetence, in which ICE has failed to detain criminal aliens when they finished their custodial sentences, sometimes waiting years to reincarcerate such individuals. Sometimes, as Justice Sonia Sotomayor noted, ICE files a detainer request and doesn’t even bother to show up to take the person into custody.A visibly annoyed Justice Breyer asked lawyer Zachary D. Tripp, assistant to the Solicitor General, “Is the government’s position that this paragraph, which says ‘shall be arrested upon release,’ applies to a person who has been released 50 years before?”Tripp sheepishly replied, “Our position is absolutely that this applies, regardless of the time in.”During Wang’s rebuttal arguments, Justice Kavanaugh noted that, “Congress did not put in a time limit, whether it’s reasonable time, as Justice Breyer says, or a year or two years or six months or 48 hours.”“Congress knew it wouldn’t be immediate, and yet, Congress did not put in a time limit. That raises a real question for me whether we should be superimposing a time limit into the statute when Congress, at least as I read it, did not itself do so.”The authority of the federal government to detain lawfully admitted immigrants with serious criminal records for the duration of their removal proceedings, without affording them a detention review, itself was barely discussed during the one hour of oral arguments.At issue was whether the government forfeits its statutory power to indefinitely detain such permanent residents if it fails to take those individuals into custody immediately after they complete their sentences.Although the plain wording of the statute doesn’t give the government discretionary authority to refrain from detaining the individuals concerned, the government argues that the act of failing to detain in a timely manner doesn’t irrevocably deprive it of its power to do so later. The green-card holders in the case disagree with this better-late-than-never approach, arguing that the detention must take place promptly upon release or not at all.Green Card HoldersThe case involves three lawful permanent residents of the United States residing in California, who were taken into custody by ICE years after completing sentences for crimes that triggered the mandatory-detention provisions of the immigration statute.The first individual facing deportation is Mony Preap, a green-card holder since he came to the U.S. as an infant in 1981. He has two 2006 misdemeanor convictions for possession of marijuana and a later conviction for simple battery. Preap was detained by ICE after the battery sentence was complete, even though it was insufficiently serious to trigger the mandatory-detention provision.The second person concerned is Eduardo Vega Padilla, a lawful permanent resident since he came to the U.S. in 1966 as an infant. He has a drug possession conviction from 1997 and another from 1999. In 2002, he was convicted of owning a firearm despite having a prior felony conviction. ICE detained him 11 years after he finished his sentence for the firearm offense.The third litigant is Juan Lozano Magdaleno, a green-card holder since 1974 when he came to the U.S. as a teenager. He has a conviction from 2000 for owning a firearm, despite a prior felony conviction. He was convicted in 2007 of for simple possession of a controlled substance and released from jail in January 2008. More than five years later, ICE detained him and held him without bond.PrecedentA case decided seven months ago may offer a clue as to how the Supreme Court will decide the case.In Jennings v. Rodriguez, decided Feb. 27 by the high court, the court examined a Ninth Circuit decision upholding a lower court ruling that mandated that immigration detainees be given bond hearings every six months. While that mandate of a bail review every six months may sound reasonable to many, it doesn’t appear in the statute.In Jennings, Justice Samuel Alito wrote the majority opinion for a 5–3 court, finding the Circuit Court had acted more like a legislature than a court by inventing the requirement of bond hearings every six months. Because the wording of the statute was clear-cut, the Circuit Court erred in filling in the blanks with a detention-review scheme of its own design. A court “relying on that canon … must interpret the statute, not rewrite it,” Alito wrote.Justice Elena Kagan recused herself in the Jennings case because she acted in it, when she served as President Barack Obama’s solicitor general. But Kagan participated in the oral arguments on Oct. 10.The case heard Oct. 10 is cited at the Supreme Court’s website as Nielsen v. Preap, No. 16-1363. center_img US News Share this article Police officers stand in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington on Jan. 19, 2018. (Reuters/Eric Thayer/File Photo) last_img read more

Read More »

QualityAuto 1080p720p480p360p240pRewind 10 Seconds

first_imgQualityAuto 1080p720p480p360p240pRewind 10 SecondsNext UpLive00:0000:0000:00ChromecastClosed CaptionsSettingsFullscreen  click to watch video Martha McSally Concedes to Kyrsten Sinema in US Senate Race By Jack Phillips November 13, 2018 Updated: November 13, 2018 US News  LINKEDINPINTERESTREDDITTUMBLRSTUMBLEUPON   GOP Rep. Martha McSally has conceded Arizona’s Senate race to Kyrsten Sinema, a Democrat, making the announcement on Twitter.“I just called Kyrsten Sinema and congratulated her on becoming Arizona’s first female senator after a hard-fought battle,” she said in a video on Nov. 12. “I wish her all success as she represents Arizona in the Senate.” Rep. Martha McSally, (R-Ariz.) at a debate in Phoenix, Arizona, on Oct. 15, 2018. (AP Photo/Matt York)Sinema is the state’s first Democrat elected to the Senate in 30 years since former Sen. Dennis DeConcini retired in 1995.Sinema had 1,097,321 votes, or 49.68 percent, and McSally had 1,059,124 votes, or 47.96 percent, NBC News reported Monday.Over the weekend, Sinema’s lead expanded by more than 32,000 votes after mail-in ballots were counted. Rep. Kyrsten Sinema, (D-Ariz.), goes over the rules in a television studio prior to a televised debate with Rep. Martha McSally, (R-Ariz.), in Phoenix, Arizona, on Oct. 15, 2018. (AP Photo/Matt York)In a statement on Facebook on Monday, Sinema said she will work in government to “find common ground.”“That’s the same approach I’ll take to representing our great state in the Senate, where I’ll be an independent voice for all Arizonans,” she wrote. “I am so honored that Arizonans chose our vision of a better Arizona. And now it’s time to get to work,” Sinema said in her victory speech on Monday night, CBS reported.Sinema succeeds Republican Sen. Jeff Flake, who declined to seek re-election in the state. The state’s other senator is Jon Kyl, a Republican who succeeded the late Sen. John McCain.Brenda Snipes, Broward County Supervisor of Elections, during a canvassing board meeting in Lauderhill Brenda Snipes, Broward County Supervisor of Elections, during a canvassing board meeting in Lauderhill, Fla., on Nov. 10, 2018. (Joe Skipper/Getty Images)Florida RecountIn Florida, Palm Beach County officials said they won’t finish its recount by the Thursday deadline. And in Broward County, additional sheriff’s deputies were sent to guard ballots and voting machines, according to The Associated Press.“An honest vote count is no longer possible” in Florida, Trump said Monday, adding that election night results should be used to determine the winner of the race.Trump also said that “new ballots showed up out of nowhere, and many ballots are missing or forged” and that “ballots (are) massively infected.”Broward Chief Circuit Judge Jack Tuter on Monday held an emergency hearing on a request by Gov. Rick  Scott’s lawyers, who said deputies should be in charge of ballots and voting machines. Tuter responded by saying, “I am urging because of the highly public nature of this case to ramp down the rhetoric.”“If someone in this lawsuit or someone in this county has evidence of voter fraud or irregularities at the supervisor’s office, they should report it to their local law enforcement officer,” Tuter said. “If the lawyers are aware of it, they should swear out an affidavit, but everything the lawyers are saying out there in front of the elections office is being beamed all over the country. We need to be careful of what we say. Words mean things these days.”The Associated Press contributed to this report. center_img Share Share this article Show Discussionlast_img read more

Read More »