French mother faces 20 years in jail for killing five of her

first_imgColmar (France): French prosecutors on Thursday demanded a 20-year prison term for a woman charged with killing five of her children right after they were born, a crime that only came to light one and a half decades after the corpses were discovered. Sylvie Horning, 55, was detained in November 2017 on suspicions she murdered the five children between 1990 and 2005. Horning, the mother of three adult children, is thought to have hidden her pregnancies even from her partner, giving birth in secret and then strangling the newborns at her house in Wittelsheim in eastern France. Nothing untoward was suspected until the discovery in 2003 of the bodies of four babies in rubbish bags in the nearby Galfingue forest. Also Read – Merkel warns UK Brexit deal ‘unlikely’ without compromise: LondonBut the initial investigation was closed in 2009 after it failed to yield clues to the deaths. It was reopened in 2016 to take advantage of advances in DNA testing, and a year later investigators made the first link between Horning and the deaths, completely by chance, after her DNA was taken in separate case following a fight with neighbours. This then showed that she was the mother of the children whose corpses were found. Horning admitted to strangling five children after giving birth to them in secret in a bathroom. A fifth baby was then found in a freezer at her home. Also Read – India, China should jointly uphold peace and stability, resolve disputes through dialogues: Chinese ambassadorHer partner, who died in 2018, had said he was completely unaware of the events. Horning’s mother is still alive but did not testify at the trial for health reasons. Prosecutor Melody Barbuti said she was asking for 20 years in jail rather than a life sentence, given the possibility that Horning could be reintegrated with society. She told the court in the eastern town of Colmar that the trial has shown Horning “did not love these babies, she considered them as things”. Horning remained immobile in the defendant’s box during the hearings, her voice only breaking with emotion when she described abuse as a child.last_img read more

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Montreal to host annual world artificial intelligence summit through 2021

first_imgMONTREAL – Montreal has been selected to host a major artificial intelligence summit for at least three years.The London-based firm behind World Summit AI says the event between 2019 to 2021 follows the second edition currently taking place in Amsterdam.Quebec’s largest city has become a global hub for research and excellence in AI, with participation from McGill University and the University of Montreal, where AI pioneer Yoshua Bengio works.The city has attracted major digital players including Google, Microsoft, IBM, Samsung, Thales and Facebook, all of which have set up AI research labs.last_img

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Indianorigin head of US pharmaceutical major found guilty of bribing doctors to

first_imgNew York: A 76-year-old Indian-origin head of a US pharmaceutical major has become the first top executive of a drugmaker to be convicted of bribing doctors in America to prescribe addictive painkillers, fuelling a national opioid crisis which has claimed the lives of tens of thousands of people over two decades. John Nath Kapoor, the founder of Insys Therapeutics pharmaceutical company based in Arizona state’s Chandler city, was found guilty of criminal conspiracy by a jury in Boston, Washington-based National Public Radio reported. Also Read – Commercial vehicle sales to remain subdued in current fiscal: IcraKapoor, a onetime billionaire, was convicted on Wednesday along with four other former executives of the company. They face up to 20 years in prison. Kapoor and his co-defendants were accused by the federal government of running a nationwide bribery scheme. India-born Kapoor founded Insys Therapeutics in 1990. Between 2012 and 2015, Insys allegedly paid doctors to prescribe its potent opioid medication and then lied to insurance companies to ensure that the expensive fentanyl-based painkiller would be covered, the report said. Also Read – Ashok Leyland stock tanks over 5 pc as co plans to suspend production for up to 15 daysThe prosecutors claimed that doctors, who were bribed, often prescribed Subsys — approved in 2012 by the US Food and Drug Administration only for use in treating severe cancer — to patients even without cancer. This practice increased the sales for Kapoor’s firm. Kapoor is among the highest-ranking pharmaceutical executives to face trial amidst a national opioid epidemic. He was arrested on the same day US President Donald Trump in 2017 declared the opioid crisis a national public health emergency that has caused tens of thousands of overdose deaths annually. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, almost 400,000 people died from overdoses involving prescription or illicit opioids over the past two decades. Opiate overdose claimed the lives of about 48,000 people in 2017 alone. The guilty verdict could strengthen the cases against other pharmaceutical executives implicated in the opioid crisis, the report said. “Today’s convictions mark the first successful prosecution of top pharmaceutical executives for crimes related to the illicit marketing and prescribing of opioids,” US Attorney Andrew E Lelling said in a statement. “Just as we would street-level drug dealers, we will hold pharmaceutical executives responsible for fuelling the opioid epidemic by recklessly and illegally distributing these drugs, especially while conspiring to commit racketeering along the way,” he said. “This is a landmark prosecution that vindicated the public’s interest in staunching the flow of opioids into our homes and streets,” he said. Brad Bailey, a criminal defence attorney in Boston and a former federal prosecutor, said the 10-week trial represented a rare instance in which the federal government used criminal charges to go after corporate executives. “That’s always unusual. That’s always an attention grabber. The big issue is the use of racketeering charges, which had been originally designed to go after the Mafia,” said Bailey. The prosecutors argued that Kapoor was motivated by money and willing to put patients’ lives at stake to improve his bottom line, the report said. Insys allegedly targeted doctors with a track record of liberally prescribing opioids, inviting them to participate in a “speakers program”, it said. According to the government, doctors were paid handsomely even if nobody showed up for the lectures, but only if the doctors wrote a lot of prescriptions for Subsys. Meanwhile, Kapoor’s lead attorney Beth Wilkinson said: “Dr Kapoor is disappointed in the verdict, as are we”. “Four weeks of jury deliberations confirm that this was far from an open-and-shut case,” Wilkinson said.last_img read more

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Comedian Beaten by Policeman Allegedly Violated Several Traffic Codes

Rabat – Comedian Amine Radi, who filmed himself being beaten by a policeman, has allegedly violated several traffic codes, Moroccan newspaper Al Ahdath Al Maghribia reported.On Saturday,  Moroccan comedian Amine Radi filmed himself as he was verbally and physically assaulted by a traffic police officer in Casablanca. The video was met with mixed reactions.Read Also: Moroccan Policeman Beats Humorist Amine Radi in CasablancaPrior to the attack, Radi was commenting on how the policeman called him a “donkey” while telling him to stop. “We are in 2019 in Morocco, and a policeman stops me saying ‘stop donkey.”The live video also shows the policeman assaulting him as he was trying to show his followers the police officer with a live stream. Al Ahdath Al Maghribia wrote today that Radi has violated traffic code. The newspaper said that the comedian was driving on the wrong side of the road and without a seat belt, which is against the traffic code.Radi filed a complaint against the policeman after the incident.The General Directorate of National Security (DGSN) has opened an investigation to determine the circumstances..The DGSN added that the General Inspectorate of National Security also launched an administrative investigation regarding the incident.“The prefectural police of Casablanca has conducted a judicial investigation under the supervision of a competent prosecutor,” said a spokesperson for the DGSN.Depending on the findings of the investigation, the officer may be charged for assault  and/or abuse of power. If prosecuted the officer may face losing his job, being fined, civic degradation, and/or a prison sentence. The judge has the power to fix and customize the sentence taking into account, first, the gravity the offense committed and, second, the personality of the offender (Article 141 of the penal code).The officer may also face charges under Article 231 which states that the use of undue violence by on-duty public official official is a punishable offense. read more

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UN human rights experts study more than 200 cases of forced disappearances

The United Nations human rights experts tasked with assisting families determine the fate or whereabouts of disappeared relatives examined over 200 cases during its recent session held in Mexico City, and is now conducting a mission to learn about Mexico’s efforts in dealing with the issue.During its 15-18 March session, the UN Working Group on Enforced or Involuntary Disappearances studied cases concerning Algeria, Bangladesh, China, Colombia, Republic of Congo, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK), Egypt, Georgia, India, Iraq, Lebanon, Mexico, Morocco, Pakistan, Spain, Sri Lanka, Syria, Thailand, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Venezuela and Yemen. The five independent human rights experts also reviewed responses from various governments to its letters and appeals, and held meetings with representatives of Japan and Guatemala, as well as consultations with family members of disappeared persons and non-governmental organizations (NGOs). In addition, it examined allegations submitted by NGOs regarding obstacles encountered in the implementation of the Declaration on the Protection of All Persons from Enforced Disappearance and decided to transmit general allegations to various concerned governments. Since its creation in 1980, the working group has dealt with more than 50,000 cases in 80 countries. By opening channels of communication between the families and governments concerned, it seeks to ensure that individual cases are investigated and to clarify the whereabouts of persons who have disappeared.The group continues to address cases of disappearances until they are resolved. Its five expert members serve in their individual capacities, and not as representatives of their governments.Immediately following its session, the group started an official visit to Mexico to learn about the country’s efforts in dealing with the issue of enforced disappearances. During the 18-31 March mission, the experts will collect information which may lead to the clarification of outstanding cases of enforced disappearances that occurred in the country. The UN expert body will examine the phenomenon of enforced disappearance, the status of the investigations of old and recent cases and the steps taken to prevent and eradicate enforced disappearances. It will also look at what is being done to combat impunity, as well as other issues concerning truth, justice and reparations for victims of enforced disappearances. The fact-finding mission will be carried out by three of the group’s experts – Jasminka Dzumhur, Osman El-Hajjé and Ariel Dulitzky – and a report on the visit will be presented to the Geneva-based Human Rights Council in 2012.The other experts are Jeremy Sarkin, who serves as Chair-Rapporteur, and Olivier de Frouville. 21 March 2011The United Nations human rights experts tasked with assisting families determine the fate or whereabouts of disappeared relatives examined over 200 cases during its recent session held in Mexico City, and is now conducting a mission to learn about Mexico’s efforts in dealing with the issue. read more

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Improved dialogue needed between UN and troop and policecontributors Security Council stresses

“The Security Council views consultations with troop- and police-contributing countries as an opportunity to set expectations for the required capabilities, performance standards, and timelines, as well as to understand the limitations of troop- and police-contributing countries,” the 15-member body said in a presidential statement. It noted the view of the Secretary-General and the High-Level Independent Panel on Peace Operations, which issued its report in June of this year, that the lack of effective dialogue through consultations between these stakeholders “has generated frustration on all sides and has undermined mandate implementation.”Recognizing that sustained consultations with the Secretariat and contributing countries are essential for a shared understanding of appropriate responses and their implications for the mandate and conduct of an operation, the Council recalled the many mechanisms that exist to facilitate the consultations between itself, these countries and the Secretariat. These include the Council’s Working Group of the Whole on UN Peacekeeping Operations; formal and informal consultations with troop- and police-contributing countries; the General Assembly’s Special Committee on Peacekeeping Operations; and the Military Staff Committee.The Council, went on to say that, “despite the existence of these mechanisms, current consultations among these three stakeholders do not meet their expectations and have yet to reach their full potential.”“The Security Council underscores that sustained consultations with potential troop- and police-contributing countries prior to the establishment and during the lifecycle of a mission, are important for a shared understanding of the mandates and a common commitment to their implementation, recognizing that such consultations should not delay the establishment of a mission.” read more

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Edinburgh Fringe labeled a plastic nightmare as Hugh FearnleyWhittingstall blasts events bar

Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall has labeled the Edinburgh Fringe festival a ‘plastic nightmare’ after seeing venues give out plastic cups instead of reusable glasses over health and safety fears.At the arts festival, which happens in pubs, bars and theatres across the city, attendees are given single-use plastic pint glasses to carry their drinks from venue to venue and eliminate the risk of broken glass underfoot.However, plastic waste campaigners have argued that there must be a more sustainable way to achieve this aim.The River Cottage chef said: “Having a great time at the #Edinburgh Festival, but it’s a #plastic nightmare, with most bars and venues insisting on plastic for all drinks (except cans).”I get the wish to avoid broken glass, but SO MUCH PLASTIC. Anyone here found a good solution? #WarOnPlastic #edfringe2019”.Comedian and actor Vicky Stone, who is also at the Fringe, said: “I completely agree. I took a plastic cup back to a bar to re-use, and they told me they WERE NOT ALLOWED TO. Insane.”Another attendee, Kate Taylor, said: “What’s with all the single use plastic cups and patio heaters when it’s literally t shirt weather? Where can I find out more about your environmental sustainability policies? “Also bar staff literally refusing to refill cups (of right size, from drinks from same bar) Entirely capable of being wrong but wonder what ‘health and safety’ issue this raises?”A Plastic Planet co-founder Sian Sutherland said: “The madness of our addiction to plastic is the saddest joke of this year’s Edinburgh festival fringe. “It’s such a shame to see that plastic cups and bottles are still used everywhere, littering this beautiful city. I thought this was meant to be an alternative festival – where are the alternatives to indestructible toxic plastic for all those Edinburgh fans?”Many attendees have suggested that the Fringe festival, like many others, should give out hard, reusable plastic cups for a deposit of a few pounds.Festivals including Glastonbury have stopped using plastic cups at their bars, while Reading Festival gives revelers 10p for every cup or bottle that is brought to a recycling point.Edinburgh Fringe Festival has been contacted for comment. read more

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Redpath leads from the front in recognising safety

first_imgThe Coal Division project team of Redpath, one of the key sponsors of the International Mining Technology Hall of Fame, has accomplished a milestone in safety performance by achieving one year Lost Time Injury Free (LTI) as of May 22, 2013. In addition to this, the team has also set a new mine development record by completing 1,216 m of one development panel throughout the month of June, more than double the usual monthly development. Redpath announced that in mid July it reached 90 days total recordable incident free, and Redpath’s General Manager of Coal, Gavin Ramage, says these great achievements are a reflection of the strong culture of safety and hard work. Redpath is the sponsor of the safety inductee www.im-halloffame.com“This is an excellent safety milestone by the team, both for Redpath and for the mining industry itself and, along with the new development record, highlights that a strong commitment to safety and productivity can achieve outstanding results,” says Ramage. “The project team also completed a very successful production month in May, with no injuries being sustained, and it is our goal to continually build upon our safe operations with productivity achievements that are industry leading.”The next goal for the project team is to achieve one year Total Recordable Injury Free, which seems ambitious, but Ramage says it is highly possible if all team members actively contribute to the ongoing reduction of unsafe conditions and unsafe behaviours.The Redpath Coal Division won its first coal mine contract in late 2011. Redpath provides contract mining and engineering services to the underground metalliferous, coal and civil sectors. For more information, please contact Kate Shuttleworth on 0418 723 841 or emaillast_img read more

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Over to you What do you want to ask Joan Burton and

first_imgSource: Sam Boal/Photocall IrelandONE OF THEM will be the next leader of the Labour Party and Tánaiste but before that Ministers Alex White and Joan Burton are going around the country appealing to party members for their support.In addition to lobbying Labour members and taking part in several hustings, the two candidates to replace Eamon Gilmore have also agreed to each do an interview with TheJournal.ie and answer your questions in the coming fortnight.As part of our coverage of the Labour leadership contest we’ll be speaking to Alex White early next week and Joan Burton the following week and they’ve both agreed to take some of your pre-submitted questions.They’ll also get to drink out of a TheJournal.ie mug – a privilege for any politician as the current Tánaiste can testify to: “Mmmm, delicious” Source: Michelle Hennessy/TheJournal.ieWhat do I need to do to ask a question?If there is something you want to ask the next leader of the Labour – be it their priorities in government or how they are going to arrest the party’s decline – then let us know in the comments section below or else drop an email to hugh@thejournal.ie.How will it work? TheJournal.ie will select the questions in advance of the interview and will endeavour to pick ones that cover a diverse range of topics.The questions will not be shown to the candidates in advance.NOTE: There will be a real, live person asking these questions, so please keep them constructive. Thanks. Read: 13 things we learned from the first Labour leadership hustingBurton v White: Nominations close, here’s what happens now in the Labour leadership racelast_img read more

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The Shield advertised for events through December YouTube views

first_img Now Playing Up Next Roman Reigns is in Remission Seth Rollins Defends WWE On Two Separate Occasions WhatsApp Pinterest Now Playing Up Next Seth Rollins MSG.com is currently advertising The Shield vs. WWE Intercontinental Champion The Miz, Sheamus and Cesaro for an upcoming live event at Madison Square Garden.The event, which takes place on December 26, seems to indicate the newly reformed group will be sticking around as a unit at least through the holiday season.WWE.com has posted a video following the group making their first entrance together through the crowd since 2014 on RAW this past Monday night in Portland.Clips of The Shield reuniting the last two weeks on RAW have also drawn solid numbers on YouTube for WWE, with videos reaching nearly 20 million views overall. The group reuniting on October 9 is approaching 9 million views alone on YouTube. WWE 205 Live Results – 9/10/19 (Kushida debuts, 6-man tag team main event match) Videos Articles Cesaro Videos Articles Recommended videosPowered by AnyClipSeth Rollins Defends WWE On Two Separate OccasionsVideo Player is loading.Play VideoPauseUnmuteDuration 0:30/Current Time 0:03Loaded: 100.00%0:03Remaining Time -0:27 FullscreenUp NextThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Replay the list Ronda Rousey On WWE: I Love This Job, But I Dont Need It Videos Articles Adam Martin RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Now Playing Up Next Ronda Rousey Highlighting WWEs Problems Now Playing Up Next New stipulation added to Roman Reigns vs. Erick Rowan this Sunday at Clash of Champions Twitter Joan Jett Set To Perform Ronda Rouseys Entrance At WrestleMania 35 Google+ Facebook Kurt Angle Now Playing Up Next Boston Celtics center Enes Kanter wins and loses WWE 24/7 Title before RAW startedlast_img read more

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You Wont Believe What Upworthy Is Planning Next

first_imgClicks and shares aren’t mutually exclusive—more clicks lead to more Newsfeed slots on Facebook too—but virality clearly starts with the latter, he says pointing to site data.The Right Way(s) to Find Out What Your Readers WantUpworthy has gotten headlines of its own for its approach to analysis. The group has a rigorous A/B testing process for its article titles, and unveiled a new stat, attention minutes, in early February.Ironically, directly asking readers what they want is a new way for them to gather data.There are important distinctions between what readers do—measured by behavioral stats like unique visitors, page views and attention minutes—and what they want—tallied in audience surveys and polls—that aren’t being made, Pariser says.Just because a story doesn’t drive traffic doesn’t mean people aren’t interested in it—it could just mean the story wasn’t presented effectively. Too often, publishers fail to distinguish between cause and effect here.”You have to be collecting both of these signals and the key is to treat both equally,” he says. “I think a lot of folks in the data-driven world like to believe that the behavioral self is the only real self. That’s not true. You have to feed both. You have to read behavior within the context of aspirations…It’s ‘Am I doing this right? Am I telling this story in an interesting way?’; not ‘Are they interested in this general topic area?” Upworthy announced plans to expand its editorial scope Wednesday, turning to its readers for ideas about where to go next.Speaking at a Social Media Week event, founders Eli Pariser and Peter Koechley said they’ll be conducting a reader survey over the next few weeks to determine exactly what areas they’ll cater to as they build out. Upworthy has 19 verticals right now.While it’s gotten attention for its clicky headlines, shares matter a lot more in its viral model, Pariser says. Reaching out to its audience for suggestions on what they’d like to read about—and presumably, tell their friends about—makes sense.”Headlines can draw people into a piece of content, but they’re not actually going to get something to go viral,” Pariser says. “Sharing is a really high-bar ask. You’re asking people to go out in front of all of their friends and say: ‘This is something I believe in and care about and I want you to pay attention to it.’ People take that trust really seriously.”last_img read more

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Noorvik Man Faces Kidnapping Attempted Sexual Assault Charges for April Attack

first_imgA Noorvik man faces charges of burglary, kidnapping, and attempted sexual assault after allegedly breaking into a neighbors home, attacking a woman who was walking by, and dragging her inside the house.It all happened on the morning of April 4 in Noorvik—a community of fewer than 700 people about 43 miles east of Kotzebue.That’s when court documents allege 28-year-old Johnny Nazuruk broke into a home in the Kobuk River community. Court records show he waited there for the woman to walk by, and then attacked her—before dragging her inside the broken-into house against her will.A sworn statement from the woman Nazuruk allegedly attacked, as well as investigation from Noorvik village public safety officer John McCrary, say once Nazuruk pulled the woman inside, he threw her down and attacked her—punching and kicking her torso and head. Court documents say Nazuruk then tried to rip off the woman’s clothes. She continued to struggle—until he turned to take off her boots. That’s when the woman says Nazuruk “raised up slightly”—and she was able to “knee [him] in the groin” and run out of the house.She fell on the steps leaving the home—and court documents say Nazuruk caught her leg and tried to pull her back inside. She screamed for help—alerting a local man walking by on his way to work. As the man approached, investigators say Nazuruk ran back into the house and locked the door. The man then walked the woman home.Days later, she told her story to VPSO McCrary, who interviewed witnesses and sought to arrest Nuzurak—but by then he was already in custody in Nome’s Anvil Mountain Correctional Center, arrested for a separate incident on charges of resisting arrest.In all Nazuruk faces five felony charges for the alleged April attack, including burglary, assault, and attempted sexual assault. He also faces one felony charge for kidnapping and one for attempted kidnapping. Nazuruk’s criminal record includes multiple convictions for assault, as well as a felony burglary conviction in 2012.He formally heard the charges against him in the Nome court Sunday, and had a first appearance for the Kotzebue court Monday. He remains in custody at AMCC.last_img read more

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Evening wrap Rupee hits record low 6 more held over Baahubali clip

first_imgHere are some of the top stories from International Business Times, India, that have broken through the day so far:1. Indian rupee falls to new low since Narendra Modi came to power; Sensex ends with lossesThe Indian rupee hit a new low of 68.86 against the US dollar on Thursday, as foreign investors continue to sell their holdings in view of an imminent interest rate hike by the US Federal Reserve next month. The previous all-time low for the domestic currency was 68.85 on August 28, 2013. Read more…2. Green Party’s Jill Stein raises millions in push to recount US election votesGreen Party nominee Jill Stein appeared to have met her initial fundraising goal early Thursday for recounts of the vote in three key swing states that went to Donald Trump — Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin, according to NBC News. Read more…3. Baahubali-The Conclusion leaked videos: 6 students arrested for circulating war sceneThe police have arrested six more people in connection with the leaked videos from the sets of Baahubali: The Conclusion (Bahubali 2). Two videos of a war scene from the climax of Baahubali 2 were leaked online recently. Read more…4. Madonna stands by son Rocco following arrest, calls it a family matterSinger Madonna has released a statement extending her support to son Rocco Ritchie, who was arrested in September following a drug bust. Read more…5. Alert: This is how aliens could contact youAliens have been a fascinating subject and there’s a growing debate on when they will get in touch with human beings. But if aliens do get in touch with humans how would they do it? Here are some theories. Read more…last_img read more

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Trudeau vows to welcome refugees

first_imgCanada’s prime minister Justin Trudeau vowed during a visit to the White House on Monday that his country would continue to welcome refugees, even as president Donald Trump defended his efforts to bar refugees from US soil as “common sense.””Canada has always understood that keeping Canadians safe is one of the fundamental responsibilities of any government,” Trudeau told a joint news conference with the US president.”At the same time, we continue to pursue our policies of openness towards refugees without compromising security.”Trump meanwhile defended his controversial move to close US borders to refugees and citizens of seven mostly-Muslim nations, saying “we cannot let the wrong people in.””It is a stance of common sense. And we are going to pursue it vigorously,” Trump said.last_img read more

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Give Your Significant Other a Valentines to Remember With Chocolate Ramen

first_imgStay on target Thieves Stole $100,000 Worth of Ramen From a Parked Semi-TrailerI Ate Robot Ramen and Drank Robot Coffee in San Francisco Valentine’s Day is just around the corner, and that likely means you’re looking for something delicious to give your significant other regarding candies or chocolates. How about something different and decadent to celebrate your relationship? Just hop a plane to Japan for some limited time sweets, namely one that might seem a little bizarre: chocolate ramen.The Tokyo ramen chain Menya Musashi offers a special chocolate ramen menu for the first two weeks of February to give diners a special treat. RocketNews24 stopped by to give the ramen a taste and see if it’s all it’s cracked up to be. Chocolate and noodles and meat, though? It sounds disgusting, but who knows?This year’s chocolate ramen special is named Tsuke Ghana 2017, which is meant to be a nod to the brand of chocolate, Ghana, that the Japanese candy company Lotte uses for its own treats. The ramen itself is served in two bowls, or “tsukemen-style,” and one has the noodles and toppings and the other bowl has your dipping sauce. In this case, a hearty chocolate sauce was used. It’s about 1,080 yen, and it offers a triple shot of chocolate with a broth made from 1.3 bars of Ghana chocolate to boot.You also get another piece of chocolate with the toppings; Foie Gras coated in chocolate with a chocolate center and all the rest of the normal ramen toppings that come with the rest of the bunch.RocketNews24 ended up digging the ramen, but it doesn’t seem like it would taste all that good to me, personally. But if you’re in the neighborhood and want to jazz up your date a little, you can’t go wrong with making a pitstop at Menya Musashi. Just don’t expect everything there to taste like candy, or you’ll be sorely disappointed.last_img read more

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Research team devises a way to create pulses of gamma rays with

first_img(Phys.org) —A team of researchers based at Texas A&M University with affiliations with several Russian Universities has come up with a way to create pulses of gamma rays that have precise shapes and timing, all from a single photon source. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the team describes how they used cobalt to produce coherent single photon pulses. More information: Coherent control of the waveforms of recoilless γ-ray photons, Nature (2014) DOI: 10.1038/nature13018AbstractThe concepts and ideas of coherent, nonlinear and quantum optics have been extended to photon energies in the range of 10–100 kiloelectronvolts, corresponding to soft γ-ray radiation (the term used when the radiation is produced in nuclear transitions) or, equivalently, hard X-ray radiation (the term used when the radiation is produced by electron motion). The recent experimental achievements in this energy range include the demonstration of parametric down-conversion in the Langevin regime1, electromagnetically induced transparency in a cavity2, the collective Lamb shift3, vacuum-assisted generation of atomic coherences4 and single-photon revival in nuclear absorbing multilayer structures5. Also, realization of single-photon coherent storage6 and stimulated Raman adiabatic passage7 were recently proposed in this regime. More related work is discussed in a recent review8. However, the number of tools for the coherent manipulation of interactions between γ-ray photons and nuclear ensembles remains limited. Here we suggest and implement an efficient method to control the waveforms of γ-ray photons coherently. In particular, we demonstrate the conversion of individual recoilless γ-ray photons into a coherent, ultrashort pulse train and into a double pulse. Our method is based on the resonant interaction of γ-ray photons with an ensemble of nuclei with a resonant transition frequency that is periodically modulated in time. The frequency modulation, which is achieved by a uniform vibration of the resonant absorber, owing to the Doppler effect, renders resonant absorption and dispersion both time dependent, allowing us to shape the waveforms of the incident γ-ray photons. We expect that this technique will lead to advances in the emerging fields of coherent and quantum γ-ray photon optics, providing a basis for the realization of γ-ray-photon/nuclear-ensemble interfaces and quantum interference effects at nuclear γ-ray transitions. Gamma rays have quite a bit more energy than regular light, and their wavelength is a lot shorter too—both attributes that could make them an ideal candidate for better data communications and other physics applications. Unfortunately, they are not as easy to produce and harness as regular light. In this new effort, the researchers looked to radioactive Cobalt as a possible solution.Normally, cobalt-57 releases pairs of photons one after the other as it decays to iron-57—the waveforms of the photons spread across time and exponentially decay. As part of their experiment, the researchers instead caused a photon to be absorbed into the nucleus of an iron atom using a sheet of steel foil, which also allowed for detection of the photon as it was later released. By vibrating the foil, the researchers found they were able to cause the photons to be absorbed at different distances from the source. This meant the reemergence of the photon as it was released could be caused to take different amounts of time to strike the detector. By changing the vibration frequency, the team found they were able to adjust the amount of time it would take the photon to strike the detector.The result of the experiment was that the researchers discovered that they were able to use the vibrating motion of the foil to create a wave form as a series of fading, coherent pulses that were all evenly spaced apart. By adjusting the vibration characteristics, the researchers found they could fine tune the number, duration and shape of the pulses—they could even produce pairs if desired. Put another way, the researchers efforts have resulted in a method for both producing and harnessing the energy in gamma rays.Possible uses for such technology range from improving spectroscopy devices, to new quantum cryptography techniques to increased high-speed data communications. Explore further © 2014 Phys.org Journal information: Naturecenter_img Experimental set-up for γ-photon waveform control. Credit: Nature (2014) doi:10.1038/nature13018 Hi-fi single photons This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Research team devises a way to create pulses of gamma rays with precise shape and timing (2014, March 17) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-03-team-pulses-gamma-rays-precise.htmllast_img read more

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Recap One lane of A50 blocked for two hours after collision

first_imgPolice search for missing woman Driver named following fatal collision Punter found hiding in bushes One lane of the A50 has been blocked for more than two hours after a driver collided with a kerb. Police officers and Highways England were called to the eastbound carriageway between the A521 and A522 following the collision shortly after 6.30am. Motorists were being advised of 50 minute delays against the flow of traffic and congestion backed up to the Creda Roundabout. Traffic monitoring company INRIX said: “One lane closed, long delays and queueing traffic for five miles due to accident, a car involved on A50 Eastbound from A521 (Blythe Bridge Roundabout / Draycot, Blythe Bridge) to A522 (Uttoxeter / Upper Tean, Uttoxeter). Congestion to Creda Roundabout. Travel time is 40 minutes. Lane one (of two) is closed. Traffic officers and police are at the scene.” We will bring more as we get it. Read MoreTop stories on StokeonTrentLivecenter_img Dad slams ‘disgusting’ hospital window    Want to tell us about something going on where you live? Let us know – Tweet us @SOTLive or message us on our Facebook page. And if you have pictures to share, tag us on Instagram at StokeonTrentLive.09:14All lanes reopen and traffic easing08:37Staffordshire Police spokesmanWe received a report of a single vehicle colliding with the kerb on the A50 eastbound at Cresswell. The driver was not injured and we are awaiting recovery of the vehicle. 08:08Traffic England updateTraffic England says congestion is due to clear between 9.15am and 9.30am. 07:35Highways England07:32Travel timeQueues are now around give miles but congestion is 40 minutes against expected.06:55INRIX update One lane closed, long delays and queueing traffic for four miles due to accident, a car involved on A50 Eastbound from A521 (Blythe Bridge Roundabout / Draycot, Blythe Bridge) to A522 (Uttoxeter / Upper Tean, Beamhurst). Travel time is 35 minutes. Lane one (of two) is closed. Traffic officers are at the scene. 06:51Delays of 50 minutesTraffic England, a service run by Highways England, reports delays of up to 50 minutes with normal traffic conditions expected to resume by 7.15am.A spokesman said: “The A50 eastbound between the junctions with the A521 Blythe Bridge East and the A522. Normal traffic conditions are expected between 07:00 and 07:15 on 12 March 2019. There are currently delays of 50 minutes against expected traffic.” 06:50Staffordshire PoliceOfficer this morning declined to comment on the collision06:42Accident locationlast_img read more

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Intelerad Sets High Standard for Collaboration

first_imgRelated CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Find more news and videos from AAPM. 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CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Find more SCCT news and videos FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Recent Videos View all 606 items Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Find more SCCT news and videos Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Technology Reports View all 9 items Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Find more news and videos from AAPM. Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Find more SCCT news and videos Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Conference Coverage View all 396 items Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Sponsored Content | Videos | Remote Viewing Systems | January 09, 2012 Intelerad Sets High Standard for Collaboration Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floorcenter_img Find more news and videos from AAPM. Information Technology View all 220 items Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more SCCT news and videos New IntelePACS 4.4 enhances communication by improving cross-functional and remote collaboration between radiologists, referring physicians and technologists through expanded instant messaging, as well as internal notes that are linked to the patient record. IntelePACS 4.4 also features workflow improvements such as new InteleViewer layouts, timeline and thumbnail views, with greater flexibility to customize displays and filter for relevancy. With the new InteleConnect edition, referring physicians have access to secure chat sessions with radiologists, improving ad-hoc consultation and clarification of results, as well as multi-level critical result SMS and e-mail notifications. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio TrackFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Radiation Oncology View all 91 items AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Women’s Health View all 62 items Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicinelast_img read more

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Scoot and Virgin partner to extend connectivity to Tasmania

first_imgSource = ETB Travel News: Brittney Levinson Good news for Tasmanians: a new interline agreement between Scoot and Virgin Australia means you can now fly all the way home from Singapore (via Melbourne) on a single ticket.Through the partnership, confirmed yesterday by Tasmania Premier and Tourism Minister Will Hodgman, low-cost carrier Scoot will connect its Singapore-Melbourne service to Virgin Australia’s services between Melbourne, Hobart and Launceston.Scoot chief executive officer Campbell Wilson said the airline has received an extremely positive response to its Singapore-Melbourne service that launched last November.“Our fantastic value airfares, plentiful choices and service with Scootitude have clearly proved a hit, so we’re delighted to making them even more accessible to Tasmanians and overseas visitors through the extension of our partnership with Virgin Australia,” Mr Wilson said.Tasmanians and visitors leaving the state will now also be able to book flights departing Hobart or Launceston to Singapore via Melbourne on a single ticket.The interline agreement comes at a crucial time for the the Tasmanian Government, which has a goal of attracting 1.5 million visitors to the state every year by 2020.The Asia visitor market, enhanced by the new connections, will play a major role in achieving this goal as the government’s Access 2020 plan reveals air capacity will need to increase by around 140,000 extra seats a year to meet the target.The arrangement will be available in industry booking systems, providing greater exposure for Tasmania in the Singapore travel distribution network. Fly Virgin Australia Fly Scootlast_img read more

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