30 Chinese workers under quarantine in N. Sulawesi after returning from China

first_imgThirty workers employed by Chinese cement company PT Conch in Lolak district, Bolaang Mongondow regency, North Sulawesi, are being quarantined under the supervision of immigration officials after arriving from China last week as a preventative measure in the wake of the novel coronavirus outbreak that originated in Wuhan, China.Kotamobagu immigration office head Joni Rumagit said the workers would be isolated and examined for 14 days after their arrival. “According to procedure, they are prohibited from exiting their room or meeting other employees. All PT Conch employees also have to wear a mask,” Joni told The Jakarta Post. The workers were also sprayed with disinfectants when they arrived at PT Conch, Fahwanto said. “The officers [that sprayed the workers] were given protective clothing,” he said, adding that Conch provided a protective mask for the company’s other employees to prevent the spread of the virus.“PT Conch’s headquarters also doesn’t want [a coronavirus outbreak]. PT Conch is free of coronavirus so far, so the public doesn’t have to worry,” he added.According to Wahyu, there are currently 121 Chinese citizens working for the company.As of Monday morning, Indonesia had no confirmed cases of the novel coronavirus. (mfp) Topics : He said the workers had returned to Indonesia after celebrating the Lunar New Year in China. “Even though [Conch] is a foreign company, it has to abide by the rules here,” he said, emphasizing that the isolation and examination rules applied to everyone without exception.Bolaang Mongondouw health agency head Erman Paputungan said the department had performed a physical scan of the workers. “Their condition is normal so far, but we will keep monitoring them for the next 14 days,” he said.Conch representative Fahwanto Wahyu said that any employee who did not follow the rules during the quarantine would be severely punished.After arriving at Sam Ratulangi airport in Manado, they were given a health card to help medical workers track their physical condition during the isolation period.last_img read more

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Possibility Of A Second Crown In 2011.

first_img Share LocalNews Possibility Of A Second Crown In 2011. by: – March 2, 2011 Tweet Share Share 66 Views   no discussions By Grace Henderson Sharing is caring! Tasha P will be given another opportunity to win her second crown when she vies for the title of Stardom Monarch of the Tent tonight at the Krazy Koconuts from 9pm.Tasha P who has already won the Calypso Queen Crown will be among eighteen Calypsonians competing with her song “Let our children be Children” which has become very popular.Checker was the winner of Last year’s Monarch of the tent.Meantime the Dominican Public are patiently waiting for the calypso finals which will be held on Saturday night when the ten Calypso Finalist will compete for the title of Calypso monarch 2011. A meeting was held Wednesday 3 March 2011 (today) to finalize performance positions on that night.The Ten Finalists will compete in the following order Leandra, Sye, Karresah, Explosion, Prosper, Checker, Might Lugars, Tasha P, Dice and Soul Puss.last_img read more

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East Central Trojans Football Techniques Camp

first_imgEast Central New Head Coach Justin Roden and the High School coaching staff would like to invite you to attend one the 2014 East Central Football Techniques Camp.Coach Roden mentions that ‘East Central Football has a long standing tradition of passionate and enthusiastic effort; in addition to winning multiple Championships. Our successes are due to young athletes committed to excel at the middle school and SDYAA levels. The football program under a new direction is looking to take the next step toward a state championship. Our goal has been and will continue to be a positive learning experience and to promote the great game of football.’2014 EC Trojan Middle School Football Technique Camp2014 EC Trojan Youth Football Technique CampPlan to become a part of the Trojan revolution.Courtesy of www.ectrojanfootball.com.last_img read more

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Arteta confirms ankle injury for David Luiz

first_img read also:Arteta ‘really pleased’ as Arsenal defeat Sheffield Utd to reach FA Cup semis And Arteta confirmed an ankle issue after the game. He told BBC Sport: “It was his ankle. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Arsenal manager, Mikel Arteta, has confirmed that central defender David Luiz has suffered an ankle injury. Luiz was back from suspension against Sheffield United at Bramall Lane in the FA Cup quarter-final. But he only managed 54 minutes of the game that Arsenal won, coming off due to an injury.Advertisementcenter_img Loading…last_img

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Guildford man charged with bribery and drug related crimes

first_imgGreendale, IN—Theodore J. Green, 25, of Guilford, was charged in Dearborn Superior Court II on Wednesday on allegations of one Count of Bribery, Obstruction of Justice, Possession of a Controlled Substance, and Possession of Paraphernalia  after he was observed giving $950 in cash to a Dearborn County Detective in an attempt to make a previously charged case “go away.”​On October 31, 2019, Green contacted Dearborn County Det. Carl Pieczonka via text message and offered Det. Pieczonka $3000 to make a case filed by another Dearborn County Sheriff’s Deputy go away. On November 4, 2019, Det. Pieczonka arranged a meeting with Green in Greendale, with other officers from the Dearborn County Special Crimes Unit observing the meeting.​At this meeting, Green gave $950 in cash to Det. Pieczonka, and was arrested by Deputies Adam Ziegler and Garret Rollins shortly thereafter. When arrested, he was also found to be in possession of a glass smoking pipe and had green plantlike material in his teeth. When questioned, Green informed officers that he had eaten a section of a Ziploc bag containing synthetic marijuana, or “spice”.​If convicted, Theodore Green faces a sentence of between 1 year and 6 years in the Indiana Department of Corrections on the Bribery Charge.​Prosecutor Lynn Deddens thanked Detective Pieczonka, Dep. Rollins, and Dep. Ziegler for their work investigating this case. “My office takes any attempt to skirt the law through bribery seriously, and we will always prosecute those who attempt to bribe officers or other public officials,” Deddens stated.last_img read more

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Kevon Wiggins is still lights out!

first_imgDESPITE MOVING to the United States of America with his family, 16-year-old Kevon Wiggins is still flying the Guyana flag as high as he did when he represented the country atKevon Wigginsthe Caribbean Basketball Confederation (CBC) U-16 Championships earlier this year.The six-foot combo guard is making a name for himself as a starter on the Evander High School basketball team based in the Bronx, New York. According to Kevon,the transition to playing in the U.S.A was a fairly smooth one.“When I went to school, the basketball coach asked if I played ball because he watched the CBC tournaments and he remembered me,” stated Kevon.From there it was just about making the team and solidifying himself as a premier player. So far the prolific player has done so. He is one of two sophomores on a team filled with seniors. Wiggins has played in seven games under Head Coach David Fonfa and has scored 99 total points with 24 two-pointers and 15 three pointers in the seven- game stretch. Wiggins is also averaging 14.14 points and 2.43 rebounds during that period.For Wiggins,the experience has been a good one to this point, despite his new surroundings. “It’s been good, but it’s harder than when I was back home. But that’s also good for me because when I return to Guyana next year I expect the games to be easier.”He also stated that in that short span of time since being a part of Evander his game has improved dramatically. “Everything has improved, especially my ability to jump. I can dunk now, my shooting is much better and my basketball IQ is still rising,” he stated.The ‘young gun’ was already as deadly as they come from behind the arc during the CBC Championships,being Guyana’s primary threat from behind the three-point line.He is currently doing computer studies at his high school and says the last thing on his mind right now is girls.“I’m not studying girls right now, I’m still a sophomore in school and I have to wait till my senior year to start being recruited by universities so that’s my focus,” he finished.With his laser-like focus, killer mentality on the court and drive, Wiggins is making Guyana proud and paving the way for more Guyanese basketball players.last_img read more

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Hockey season far from over

first_imgWith the men’s and women’s hockey teams bringing a pair of those shiny championship trophies back to Madison, it’s safe to say that most students have had enough of hockey for a little while.In fact, most American sports fans would tell you that they’re done watching pucks fly until October, when college hockey resumes once again.Not for me, though. As cool as it was to witness two teams at my school earn national championships in a matter of a month — during my freshman year — the fun hasn’t even really begun yet. There’s still two more months of good hockey left.I’m talking about the NHL playoffs, the great race for Lord Stanley’s Cup.Editors’ note: Since Mr. Brenner declined to explain what the “NHL” is, we, the editors, feel inclined to inform the reader that it stands for the National Hockey League. It’s the professional version of college hockey, which we all have learned to love. You can learn more about said “NHL” on the Internet, or by calling up any Canadian person you know. — Respectfully, the EditorsThe NFL postseason is fantastic, the MLB playoffs have had their moments, and the NBA playoffs are great as well. But thinking back on my 19 years of experience watching sports, I must admit that my greatest postseason memories have definitely happened in the NHL playoffs.I’ll admit something else right off the bat … I’ve barely watched a game all year. I used to be a die-hard Colorado Avalanche fan and a die-harder Detroit Red Wings hater, but that part of my life as passed.That’s probably due to a combination of three things. First, there’s the lockout, which cancelled all NHL games for the 2004-05 season. There’s also the fact that I moved to Wisconsin, a state that lacks a pro team (something I’ll never be able to figure out why). As a result of the latter reason, Madison doesn’t seem to televise many regional NHL games at all.However, in the past, I would be able to rely on national broadcasts, but there’s your third reason why I haven’t been keeping up on the Avalanche. There is none, since ESPN decided to drop their contract with the NHL.Oh, sure, there’s OLN, putting games on the air on Monday and Tuesday nights. But I tried watching a few games, and it just wasn’t the same without Gary Thorne, Steve Levy and Barry Melrose. Besides, I just can’t take a network seriously when it prides itself upon nonstop coverage of a bicycle race once a year.However, it all changed last Saturday. NBC began televising games Jan. 14 and continued into mid-February with some weekend games. But last weekend, I had a few minutes and turned on the tube, and NBC was showing my Avs taking on the St. Louis Blues.Within two minutes, Joe Sakic — my childhood hero and former neighbor just down the street in Littleton, Colo., — ripped that beautiful wrister of his past the Blues netminder.At that point, I had a revelation. The NHL playoffs — for the first time in 24 months — are coming up, and I wouldn’t be Aaron Brenner if I missed ’em.I mean, the NHL playoffs have produced such great moments as the five-overtime thriller between Dallas and Anaheim in 2003, the New Jersey Devils clinching the championship with a Jason Arnott overtime goal and guys like Dave Andreychuk and Ray Bourque riding off into the sunset by winning the Stanley Cup in their final games (all right, I’m a little biased on that last one).But let’s talk about that Cup for a second, because that’s the best part of the whole playoffs. Beyond a shadow of a doubt, the Stanley Cup is the absolute coolest championship trophy in the world of sports. Hands down.I mean, like I said before, those NCAA plaques look nice, but how cool is it to watch the players parade around the ice with this massive silver Cup after clinching the title, pumping it up and down, kissing it, the whole bit? It’s an unbelievably time-honored tradition, something lacking from football, baseball and basketball, where the trophy itself means very little.Speaking of tradition, the Cup is full of that. It was purchased in 1892 by Lord Stanley, who thought the best hockey team in the world (or Canada at that time, to be more specific; hockey wasn’t exactly a worldwide sport in the 19th century) should be represented with a silver cup. It was first used in the NHL in 1918 and will be awarded for the 87th time to the winner of these upcoming Cup playoffs.Each player on the winning team will get to travel with the Cup wherever they want and do whatever they want for a day in the offseason, another super-cool tradition of the playoffs.So I guess that, while I’m not quite the Avs fan I used to be, I’m officially pumped for two more full months of hockey. I just hope I’m not the only one.Otherwise, it might just be a whole lot of Canadians and me tuning in.Yes, you just read a column on the NHL. No, Aaron did not write this on a dare. You can make fun of his love for professional hockey by e-mailing comments to abrenner@badgerherald.com.last_img read more

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Daddio, aggressive Syracuse wings earn Orange critical possessions at faceoff X

first_imgVILLANOVA, Pa. – Syracuse’s faceoff specialists didn’t have to dominate. They just had to compete.The Orange (13-3) battled to a respectable 11 of 26 on faceoffs, giving its well-oiled offense plenty of opportunities to dismantle Villanova’s (7-8) defense in SU’s 13-9 win in the Big East championship Saturday. An improved performance from Chris Daddio combined with unforgiving play from Syracuse’s wings provided a stark contrast from SU’s last visit against Villanova.After leaving Villanova Stadium on March 23 stunned by an 11-10 upset and Thomas Croonquist’s 22-of-24 performance at the faceoff X, Syracuse entered Saturday’s matchup knowing a repeat performance against an improved VU team would likely spell defeat.On Friday, captain Brian Megill said SU’s wings would have to play the game of their lives. In Saturday’s victory, he said they delivered just that.“They hustled for every ground ball, they weren’t letting ‘Nova pick it up easily,” Megill said. “We lost some faceoffs, we lost some GBs, but I thought we came up with the critical ones.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textCroonquist actually won five of the first six draws, prompting SU to send out Cal Paduda in place of Chris Daddio to start the second quarter. Paduda dragged Croonquist into an eight-second struggle for the ball that the Villanova specialist ultimately won, but he and Daddio had both already sent a clear message – the Wildcats would not run wild on SU again.Daddio re-entered for the next faceoff a minute later. He popped the ball back to Henry Schoonmaker, who dodged past Jack Rice and Jimmy Wyatt to set up a quick shot for Luke Cometti. Syracuse would have just as many chances off the draw as the Wildcats.Syracuse wings Schoonmaker, Matt Harris and Matt Pratt combined for nine ground balls, capably tangling with VU’s usually dominant John LoCascio, who took six of his own.Once Daddio came back in the game, SU won 10 of the remaining 19 faceoffs, cracking the 50-percent target it set Friday.“I mean, he’s good,” Croonquist said of Daddio. “… faceoffs are whoever gets hot and whoever’s not hot. And they did a good job on the ground balls today. Quite honestly I just didn’t play well enough to take over.” Comments Related Stories ONE MORE TIME: Behind pivotal 3-goal 3rd quarter, Syracuse beats Villanova 13-9 to win 2nd-straight Big East tournament championshipWith Marasco shut down, Rice tallies 5 points to lead Syracuse past VillanovaSyracuse defense limits Villanova’s top scorers, allows Orange to expand lead late Published on May 4, 2013 at 5:58 pm Contact Jacob: jmklinge@syr.edu | @Jacob_Klinger_center_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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Former Syracuse safety Darius Kelly to reportedly attend Buffalo Bills minicamp

first_imgFormer Syracuse safety Darius Kelly will report to the Buffalo Bills’ rookie minicamp beginning on Friday, Dan Tortora of Dan Tortora Broadcast Media reported on Monday afternoon.Kelly played in all of SU’s 25 games over the past two seasons and started all 12 of 2014. He recorded 61 tackles, two for a loss, an interception and five pass deflections last season. He spent the past two seasons with the Orange after transferring from Pima Community College, where he played in 2011 and 2012.Kelly wasn’t selected in this year’s NFL Draft, which ended on Saturday. For the first time since 2008 and second since 1975, no Syracuse players were picked.Kelly is the seventh former SU player to join an NFL team since the draft ended. Safety Durell Eskridge signed with the New York Jets, linebackers Cameron Lynch and Dyshawn Davis signed with the St. Louis Rams and Washington Redskins, respectively. Offensive tackle Sean Hickey signed with the New Orleans Saints and defensive tackle Eric Crume signed with the Jacksonville Jaguars. Cornerback Brandon Reddish will attend the Oakland Raiders’ minicamp. Comments AdvertisementThis is placeholder text Published on May 4, 2015 at 2:44 pm Contact Paul: pmschwed@syr.edu | @pschweds Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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Johnny Strange remembered for his love of adventure

first_imgCarpe diem · Alumnus Johnny Strange passed away last Thursday, Oct. 1, while attempting a BASE jump in the Swiss Alps. He was 23. – Photo courtesy of Brett LinkletterAlumnus Johnny Strange, a well-known BASE jumper, mountain climber and surfer, died while attempting to BASE jump off of a mountain in the Swiss Alps last Thursday. He was 23.Strange crashed into the side of a mountain around noon, ending a life that was filled with daring risks and daredevil stunts.Strange lived a life dedicated to adventure and adrenaline. By the age of 17, he was the youngest person to climb the highest mountains on all seven continents. In his sophomore year at USC, Strange completed the final leg of the Explorers Grand Slam — climbing mountains on all seven continents and visiting both poles — by skydiving from 8,000 feet in the North Pole.Strange came from a family of adventurers. His parents, Brian and Dianette, trekked around the world to compete in adventure races that involved hiking, climbing, rappelling and kayaking. Strange and his two sisters, Brianna and MacKenna, followed their parents, and the family’s adventurous spirit rubbed off on Strange.The first activity that Strange became involved in was mountain climbing — something that used up the abundant energy that often drove his parents wild when he was younger. Soon, climbing became more than a hobby or an afternoon pastime for Strange, and he began to pick up other interests. He became a martial artist, a big-wave surfer, a scuba diver and a paraglider. It was the final activity that cost Strange his life, but his lifestyle was one that he cherished greatly.“If I can say anything about Johnny, it’s that he really did live every day to the fullest and not in some cliche way. He never did what he didn’t feel like doing unless it was for our family, and he was really the best in the world at his sport,” Brianna Strange said.Johnny Flying · Alumnus Johnny Strange passed away last Thursday, Oct. 1, while attempting a BASE jump in the Swiss Alps. He was 23. – Photo courtesy of Brett LinkletterStrange had always been one to take risks. His sister recalled a story of the day he decided to break the world record for speed on a skateboard. He held onto the back of a truck by one finger and reached 102 miles per hour on the highway, skateboard wobbling under his feet from the speed. When the board flew out from under him, Strange launched himself into the back of the truck to save himself from crashing.“That was Johnny,” Brianna Strange said.The day that Strange died, his plan was to BASE jump off of Mount Gitschen in Switzerland. Winds were powerful and choppy, something Strange noted before his jump. He had posted several videos of other jumps in Switzerland in the days leading up to his death. Besides poor conditions, it is uncertain what caused Strange to crash.Strange is one of 25 BASE jumpers to die while jumping this year. One of the other BASE jumpers was Dean Potter, a world-renowned climber and adventurer who Strange openly admired. After Potter’s death in May, Strange posted on Instagram, mourning the loss of his idol.“See you on the other side,” he wrote in the post.“I made the mistake of reading the first few comments on one of his articles, and what I realized people don’t understand is that Johnny and people like Johnny have a certain hunger for life that is actually unstoppable,” Brianna Strange said. “Even if we could’ve taken away his wings and stopped his plane to Switzerland, and even if we could’ve grounded him forever, he would’ve found another way to go fast and to push the limits of what anyone thought was physically possible.”While at USC, Strange majored in international relations and dedicated his free time to his two advocacy efforts — stopping genocide and curing Parkinson’s disease. He often used his status as a world-famous adventurer to raise awareness for both campaigns, holding signs that read “Stop genocide” while posing on top of mountains and then posting them on his Instagram. This effort reflected Strange’s approach to life: always attempting to make a difference in as many ways as possible. A passionate Oakland Raiders fan, Strange also commonly donned a Raiders helmet while skydiving.Strange was also a member of the Sigma Chi fraternity, where he met Brett Linkletter during rush sophomore year. Linkletter remembers that they were a little worried that Strange’s propensity for risk would cause him to hurt himself, but Strange quickly became one of his closest friends.“He was a puppy dog,” Linkletter said. “He constantly needed excitement, needed to infuse even the most boring things with energy and life and adventure. He was incredible to be around.”After college, Strange often stayed with Linkletter in between his trips. Linkletter took pictures for Strange and advised him on how to manage his digital presence properly. The night before he died, Strange texted Linkletter a picture, asking if it looked “epic” enough to post on Instagram. Linkletter told him yes, encouraged him to post it and then went to bed. Linkletter woke up to a phone call from a close family friend with the news. For an hour, he refused to believe it. It was only when a second friend, another fraternity brother, called him that it sunk in — Strange was gone. Linkletter admits that it’s still hard to think about.“It’s one of those things that your brain refuses to process,” Linkletter said. “He was always doing what he loved no matter what. He knew the dangers behind it, people encouraged him not to do it, but he never fell to traditional pressure from other people. He knew what he wanted to do, and he enjoyed it. That rubbed off on me a lot.”Carpe diem · Alumnus Johnny Strange passed away last Thursday, Oct. 1, while attempting a BASE jump in the Swiss Alps. He was 23. – Photo courtesy of Brett LinkletterLinkletter spoke to the Sigma Chi fraternity about Strange on Monday night. He told them about the legacy that Strange leaves behind, one that goes beyond world records and incredible stunts. He told them that what he remembers most of his friend is a young man who refused to let others define him, who stayed humble despite his accomplishments and  challenged the fraternity to live on in the same way, with that same pride and confidence. Strange inspired him to live an extraordinary life, to start his own marketing business and take risks. That passion and free-spirited nature is best summed up in a quote Strange gave earlier this year — a quote that Linkletter hopes to honor for the rest of his life.“The day I let my fear deter my ability to follow my dreams, I have already died,” Strange wrote in a blog post on his website. “I will, as well as everyone else die someday, but on this day, I was more alive than I had ever been before.”The Strange family will host a memorial service next Monday to honor Strange. The family will wear black and gray to support Strange’s favorite team, play a game of football and share stories from Strange’s life. Though he only lived to 23, family and friends agreed that Strange lived more in those years than most live in 80 or 90. His memorial will be a celebration — not a mourning — for a life well-lived and filled with purpose and adventure.Strange is survived by his mother, father and two sisters.last_img read more

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